From Al Jazeera. Any opinions expressed are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Iraq has been engulfed in violent protests in the past few weeks as soldiers fired live rounds into crowds.

But this has only entrenched the protesters’ position as they demand a complete overhaul of the political system.

The government has cut off access to the internet, as it says that its youth are being influenced by what they read.

But the protesters have found other means to get around the online silence.

Al Jazeera‘s Natasha Ghoneim reports from Baghdad:

From Al Jazeera. Any opinions expressed are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Iraqis are defying a curfew in a new wave of protests.

They are back on the streets of the capital, calling for political change.

There is widespread anger over corruption, the lack of jobs and poor public services.

Al Jazeera’s Natasha Ghoneim reports from Baghdad:

From Al Jazeera. Any opinions expressed are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Iraqis are defying a curfew in a new wave of protests.

They are back on the streets of the capital, calling for political change.

There is widespread anger over corruption, the lack of jobs and poor public services.

Al Jazeera’s Natasha Ghoneim reports from Baghdad:

From Al Jazeera. Any opinions expressed are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

More than 60 people have been killed in two days of demonstrations against Iraq’s government.

Influential Shia cleric Muqtada al-Sadr is calling for the prime minister to resign. And MPs linked to him are staging a sit-in at parliament.

Al Jazeera’s Natasha Ghoneim reports from Baghdad.

From Al Jazeera. Any opinions expressed are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

At least 21 people have been killed in Iraq, with protesters back on the streets sceptical about a government promise to introduce sweeping economic reforms.

Demonstrators are calling for Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi to resign.

They say he is not doing enough to tackle high levels of unemployment and corruption.

Al Jazeera’s Natasha reports from Baghdad.

From Al Jazeera. Any opinions expressed are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Fed up with years of corruption, unemployment and a lack of basic services, tens of thousands of Iraqis are taking to the streets to protest for a better future.

Security forces have responded to the crowds of mostly young men with astonishing brutality, firing live ammunition, water cannons and tear gas.

More than 100 people have been killed and thousands injured in this latest round of protests, some of the biggest Iraq has seen in years.

Many demonstrators want a complete overhaul of the government. Others believe the best way forward is for the current government to make good on a new reform plan to tackle poverty and corruption.

But with the PM warning that there are “no magic solutions,” many are skeptical that things will actually change.

During Monday’s episode we ask, will protesters in Iraq get what they want?

From Al Jazeera. Any opinions expressed are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Iraqi protesters have lost their patience with what they say is decades of corruption and lack of services.

They’re demanding Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi resign – and the whole political system be overhauled.

Mahdi says there is ‘no magic solution’ and any progress will take time.

The government has announced a list of reforms to address some of the grievances.

But protesters are back on the streets and have attacked the headquarters of political parties and TV stations in Baghdad.

Police responded by using live rounds and tear gas.

At least 100 people have been killed in five days of protests.

Parliament had planned to hold an emergency session on Saturday – but it never happened.

But the Speaker of Parliament did make some promises…

Presenter:

  • Peter Dobbie

Guests:

  • Dlawer Ala-Aldeen President, Middle East Research Institute (MERI)
  • Renad Mansour Director, Iraq Initiative, Chatham University
  • Zeidon Alkinani Contributour, Open Democracy

From AFP. Any opinions expressed are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Baghdad curfew lifted but Iraq on alert for new protests

A curfew is lifted in Baghdad following days of protests which have left nearly 100 dead, but tensions remain after firebrand cleric Moqtada Sadr demanded the government quit.

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From Al Jazeera. Any opinions expressed are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

The death toll from three days of mass anti-government protests in Iraq has risen to 20, with hundreds more wounded as authorities imposed curfew in several cities and cut internet access across much of the country to quell unrest.

The protests, which began in capital Baghdad on Tuesday, are mostly spontaneous and without political leadership, staged by disenchanted youth demanding jobs, improved services, such as electricity and water, and an end to Iraq’s endemic corruption.

The demonstrations have since spread to cities across the mainly Shia south, making it the most serious challenge to Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi’s year-old government.

Al Jazeera’s Osama Bin Javaid has the latest: