From Al Jazeera. Any opinions expressed are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Iraq is planning to build a new oil pipeline to Jordan which it is banking on to revive revenue sources, after years of war and instability.

In addition to expanding refineries and oil fields, Iraq is also planning to rehabilitate a pipeline via Turkey.

But it is not the first time Iraqis have heard plans like these and many say they will believe it when they see some change in their lives.

Al Jazeera’s Osama Bin Javaid visited Basra refinery in the third part of his series on Iraq’s energy sector:

From Al Jazeera. Any opinions expressed are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Iraq’s government wants to see a big increase in oil production.

Oil and natural gas make up 90 percent of the country’s revenue.

But years of war and new environmental challenges are making it difficult to attract vital international investment.

Al Jazeera’s Osama Bin Javaid reports from the Majnoon oil field near the Iranian border:

From Al Jazeera. Any opinions expressed are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

It has been five years since the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL or ISIS) was defeated in the Kurdish region of northern Iraq.

The area has been stable since then, but it has struggled economically.

There are 1.4 million people working in the government and public sector in the semi-autonomous region. They watched their paychecks shrink or disappear, beginning in 2014.

That was when the war with ISIL began, the price of oil plummeted and the federal government of Iraq cut budget payments to the Kurdistan Regional Government.

Austerity measures were implemented and workers paid the price with reduced salaries.

However, following the formation of a new government this year, many people are hoping that this is starting to change.

Al Jazeera’s Natasha Ghoneim reports from Erbil:

From Al Jazeera. Any opinions expressed are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Years of war and instability have damaged Iraq’s gas and oil infrastructure, leaving it dependent on energy imports, despite having huge reserves.

Now it wants to turn that around, with help from overseas investment.

Al Jazeera’s Osama Bin Javaid reports from Zubayr:

From Al Jazeera. Any opinions expressed are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Iraq and Iran are neighbours: Around $25m worth of Iranian goods enter Iraq every day.

But a US deadline that allows Iraq to trade with Iran is set to expire in three months, and Tehran and Baghdad are trying to find a way around it.

Iraqi traders are worried, as Iranian goods are much cheaper.

Al Jazeera’s Osama Bin Javaid has this report from Baghdad:

From Al Jazeera. Any opinions expressed are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Slow progress is being made to rebuild the ruined city of Mosul in northern Iraq.

It is two years since the Iraqi army, with a United States-led coalition and Iran-backed Shia militias, drove ISIL fighters from the capital of their self-declared caliphate.

Reconstruction efforts are not being helped by the sanctions imposed by the US on Iraq’s ally Iran.

UN agencies estimate it may take tens of millions of dollars and 10 years just to remove mines and explosives.

Al Jazeera‘s Osama Bin Javaid reports:

From Al Jazeera. Any opinions expressed are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Iraq’s vast oil wealth once paid for some of the best health services in the Middle East.

But decades of conflict and political unrest have led to, what the government admits, a crisis in hospitals.

Things are particularly bad in Basra province where people have long complained of government neglect.

Around 70 children are being treated for cancer in Basra Children’s Hospital.

Experts say pollution from surrounding oilfields is one of the reasons why Basra has the highest rate of cancer in Iraq.

Al Jazeera‘s Charles Stratford reports:

From Al Jazeera. Any opinions expressed are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Mheibes: Iraq’s Ramadan ring game returns after ISIL’s defeat

A traditional Arab game is making a welcome return for players in northern Iraq.

Known as the ring game or Mheibes, it has been played by Iraqis for decades during Ramadan.

However, the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) banned the popular pastime in Mosul when it took over the city five years ago.

Now, with the ISIL gone, it’s game on again.

Al Jazeera‘s Rob Matheson reports from Baghdad:

From Al Jazeera. Any opinions expressed are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Could Iraq be pulled into a conflict between the United States and Iran?

The United States is raising the stakes against what it calls threats from Iran.

President Donald Trump is sending an extra 1,500 troops to the Middle East.

He’s also bypassing Congress to sell billions of dollars’ of weapons to Iran’s rivals, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates.

Iran’s neighbour, Iraq, is vowing support and offering to mediate.

At the same time, Iraq is wary of straining relations with the Americans.

How should leaders in Baghdad handle this balancing act?

Presenter:

  • Hashem Ahelbarra

Guests:

  • Andreas Kreig – Assistant Professor, Defence Studies Department, King’s College London
  • Sami Nader – Director, The Levant Institute for Strategic Affairs
  • Robert Gutsche – Associate Professor, Lancaster University