From Al Jazeera. Any opinions expressed are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Iraq is hoping for more concrete pledges from international donors on the second day of a conference on rebuilding cities and infrastructure shattered by the conflict with ISIL (the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, also known as ISIS).

On Monday, non-governmental organisations pledged more than $300 million to the reconstruction effort, far short of the $100 billion the government says it needs.

Al Jazeera‘s Sami Zeidan reports from Kuwait:

From Al Jazeera. Any opinions expressed are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Iraq is hoping to raise billions of dollars at a donor conference starting on Monday in Kuwait – to finance the reconstruction after its campaign against ISIL (the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, also known as ISIS).

It is estimated that $100bn is needed for the reconstruction.

Large parts of Iraq’s second-largest city, Mosul, are still in ruins, more than six months after it was retaken by the government.

Al Jazeera’s Sami Zeidan reports from Kuwait:

From AFP. Any opinions expressed are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Literary cafes, poetry readings and pavement bookstalls — Mosul’s cultural scene is back in business, months after Iraqi forces ousted the Islamic State group from the city following three years of jihadist rule.

View on YouTube

From Al Jazeera. Any opinions expressed are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

In 2014, ISIL announced it was taking over nearly all of Iraq and Syria.

But three years later and billions lost, Iraq’s Prime Minister Haider Al Abadi says his military has defeated the armed group.

It’s been a long road to get to this point. The battle for Mosul alone took months. Almost a million people had to flee, and thousands left behind were killed.

More than eight thousand homes were reportedly destroyed. And that was just one of several Iraqi cities once controlled by ISIL.

What does this mean for Iraq’s future?

Presenter:

  • Sami Zeidan

Guests:

  • Ali Al Dabbagh – Former Spokesman for the Iraqi Government
  • Tallha Abdulrazaq – Researcher at the University of Exeter’s Strategy and Security Institute
  • Ahmed Rushdi – Adviser to the Speaker of the Iraqi Parliament

From Al Jazeera. Any opinions expressed are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Engineers in northern Iraq are carrying out repairs on a vital dam damaged by the earthquake that also devastated areas in neighbouring Iran.

The dam, which provides water and electricity to about two million people, risks breaking and unleashing disastrous flooding.

More than 500 people were killed and about 70,000 were displaced after the deadliest earthquake of the year struck a border region between Iran and Iraq.

Al Jazeera‘s Sinem Koseoglu reports from Darbandikhan:

From AFP. Any opinions expressed are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

The Islamic State group’s occupation of northern Iraq and the battle to defeat it has caused more than $100 billion worth of damage, Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi said on Saturday: