By John Lee.

General Electric (GE) is reportedly expected to win a large share of the multibillion-dollar contracts to rebuild Iraq’s electricity system.

According to a report from Reuters, “under U.S. prodding, Iraq is asking both Siemens and GE to bid on contracts and expects to make awards to each of the companies“.

Following a hotly-contested competition last year, it was agreed that Siemens and GE would share the work to upgrade they system, with GE supplying 14 gigawatts (GW), and Siemens 11 GW.

The Financial Times subsequently reported that the deals were not certain to be approved.

(Source: Reuters)

By John Lee.

The US Ambassador to Iraq, Matthew H. Tueller, joined Minister of Water Resources Jamal al-Adili and Italian Ambassador Pasquino to celebrate the successful completion of emergency efforts to stabilize Mosul Dam.

The United States provided $124 million for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to serve as the “Engineer” for the project, working side by side on the $408 million contract between the Government of Iraq and the Italian company Trevi.

(Source: US Embassy in Baghdad)

By John Lee.

The Trump administration has reportedly granted Iraq a 120-day waiver from its sanctions against Iran, to allow it to continue importing electricity from the country during the hottest of the summer weather.

The decision followed a phone call on Friday between Secretary of State Michael Pompeo (pictured) and Iraqi Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi.

The State Dept said it is continuing to work with Iraq to end its dependence on Iranian natural gas and electricity.

(Sources: Bloomberg, The National)

By John Lee.

The United States has imposed sanctions on an Iraqi company, South Wealth Resources Company (SWRC), which it is says is an Iraq-based affiliate of Iran‘s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC).

The full text of the Treasury Department’s statement is shown below:

Today [Wednesday 13th June], the U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) imposed sanctions on an Iraq-based Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps-Qods Force (IRGC-QF) financial conduit, South Wealth Resources Company (SWRC), which has trafficked hundreds of millions of dollars’ worth of weapons to IRGC-QF-backed Iraqi militias.

SWRC and its two Iraqi associates, who are also being designated today, have covertly facilitated the IRGC-QF’s access to the Iraqi financial system to evade sanctions.  This scheme also served to enrich previously sanctioned Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis, an Iraqi advisor to IRGC-QF Commander Qasem Soleimani, who has run weapons smuggling networks and participated in bombings of Western embassies and attempted assassinations in the region.

SWRC and its two associates are being designated as Specially Designated Global Terrorists (SDGTs) pursuant to Executive Order (E.O.) 13224, which targets terrorists and those providing support to terrorists or acts of terrorism.

“Treasury is taking action to shut down Iranian weapons smuggling networks that have been used to arm regional proxies of the IRGC Qods Force in Iraq, while personally enriching regime insiders,” said Treasury Secretary Steven T. Mnuchin. “The Iraqi financial sector and the broader international financial system must harden their defenses against the continued deceptive tactics emanating from Tehran in order to avoid complicity in the IRGC’s ongoing sanctions evasion schemes and other malign activities.”

The IRGC-QF, designated pursuant to E.O. 13224 on October 25, 2007, is a branch of the IRGC responsible for external operations and has provided material support to numerous terrorist groups, including the Taliban, Lebanese Hizballah, HAMAS, and Palestinian Islamic Jihad, making it a key component of Iran’s destabilizing regional activities.  The IRGC-QF’s parent organization, the IRGC, was designated pursuant to E.O. 13224 on October 13, 2017, and on April 15, 2019 was designated as a Foreign Terrorist Organization by the Secretary of State.

South Wealth Resources Company

The IRGC-QF has used Iraq-based SWRC, also known as Manabea Tharwat al-Janoob General Trading Company, as a front to smuggle hundreds of millions of dollars’ worth of weapons to its proxies inside Iraq, while also generating profit in the form of commission payments for Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis, an OFAC-sanctioned advisor to IRGC-QF commander Qasem Soleimani, and two associates of SWRC who are also being designated today.  In addition to facilitating the IRGC-QF’s weapons smuggling into Iraq, SWRC has moved millions of dollars to Iraq for illicit financial activity benefitting the IRGC-QF and its Iraq-based militia groups.

SWRC is being designated today pursuant to E.O. 13224 for assisting in, sponsoring, or providing financial, material, or technological support for, or financial or other services to or in support of, the IRGC-QF.

Makki Kazim ‘Abd Al Hamid Al Asadi and Muhammed Hussein Salih Al Hasani

OFAC also is designating Makki Kazim ‘Abd Al Hamid Al Asadi (Makki Kazim Al Asadi) and Muhammed Husayn Salih al-Hasani (al-Hasani), two Iraq-based individuals who helped facilitate IRGC-QF shipments and financial operations via SWRC.  Both individuals and Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis received commission payments for contracts with SWRC.

Makki Kazim Al Asadi has acted as an intermediary to facilitate IRGC-QF shipments destined for Iraq, and has helped the IRGC-QF access the Iraqi financial system to evade sanctions.  Makki Kazim Al Asadi is being designated pursuant to E.O. 13224 for assisting in, sponsoring, or providing financial, material, or technological support for, or financial or other services to or in support of, the IRGC-QF.

Muhammed Hussein Salih Al Hasani is the authorized agent and representative of SWRC, which he registered in Iraq in 2013.  He has signed weapons contracts for SWRC.

Al Hasani is being designated pursuant to E.O. 13224 for acting for or on behalf of SWRC.

Sanctions Implications

As a result of today’s action, all property and interests in property of these targets that are in the United States or in the possession or control of U.S. persons must be blocked and reported to OFAC.  OFAC’s regulations generally prohibit all dealings by U.S. persons or within the United States (including transactions transiting the United States) that involve any property or interests in property of blocked or designated persons.

In addition, persons that engage in certain transactions with the individuals and entities designated today may themselves be exposed to sanctions or subject to an enforcement action.  Furthermore, unless an exception applies, any foreign financial institution that knowingly facilitates a significant transactions for any of the individuals or entities designated today could be subject to U.S. sanctions.

View identifying information related to today’s action.

(Source: US Treasury Dept)

Actress Alia Shawkat Designs Exclusive Tee for 5K to Benefit Iraqi Children

Iraqi-American performer and producer, Alia Shawkat, is best known for her acting work in TV shows like Arrested Development and films like Whip It and The Runaways.

She is also a talented artist, with her contemporary works featuring in high profile gallery shows including at the Known Gallery and Dilettante Gallery in LA.

This year, Ms Shawkat joins the Iraqi Children Foundation (ICF) to design a custom t-shirt for their upcoming “In Their Shoes” 5K race in Alexandria VA, on June 22nd.

Ms Shawkat’s artistic style is a playful and contemporary mix of colors and textures, often taking the form of abstract cartoons.

I’ve grown more and more curious as I’ve gotten older about my father’s heritage”, says Ms Shawkat.

I’ve travelled to the Middle East and feel such a strong connection to the people and the environment.

The more misunderstood Arabs and the Muslim culture are in America, the deeper my urge is to share the beauty of our culture with Americans and in my art”.

Ms Shawkat’s father came to America from Baghdad in the 1970s with only $200 in his pocket, and eventually started his own business.

Her father has been an active participant in charitable giving for children in Iraq, and this commitment clearly runs in the family.

I’m open to every opportunity that allows me to help children in need”, says Ms Shawkat.

Iraqi Children Foundation invests in education, legal protection, and medical on-the-ground support for Iraq’s most vulnerable orphans and street children.

An investment in these children is an investment in the future of Iraq.

In 2018, ICF provided 14,200 meals for children enrolled in their education programs, and handled 675 legal cases for children, including the victims of sex trafficking.

Without these critical services, these children are vulnerable to abuse, neglect, and exploitation by criminals, traffickers, and extremists.

The Alia Shawkat t-shirts are available exclusively through registration in the 5K in Alexandria this week.

The event, now in its 7th year, promises to be a fun family-friendly morning, with an after party including Iraqi music, snacks, and entertainment.

For those who can’t make it to Alexandria, donations can be made via the same link, or registrants can sign up and note and note their location as a “remote runner” in the comments (ICF will send remote runner’s shirts with free shipping in continental US).

Race details:

ICF’s “In Their Shoes” 5K will be held at the US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) at 0800 on June 22, 2019 (registration opens at 0700).

Registration link: https://runsignup.com/Race/VA/OldTownAlexandria/InTheirShoes5KIraq

For more information please contact Liz McRae: liz@iraqichildren.org, +1.202.790.1109

On June 9, 2019, Ambassador Matthew H. Tueller presented his credentials to serve as U.S. Ambassador to Iraq to President Barham Salih and Foreign Minister Mohamed Alhakim.

Ambassador Tueller thanked President Salih and Minister Alhakim for their warm reception and commented:

The United States is committed to our Strategic Framework Agreement which defines our bilateral relationship with Iraq as one of America’s most important and strategic partners in the region.

“I am honored to serve as the U.S. Ambassador to Iraq and I look forward to engaging with our Iraqi partners and the Iraqi people to support a united, democratic, and prosperous Iraq.”

Ambassador Tueller replaces former Ambassador Douglas Silliman.

He previously served most recently as U.S. Ambassador to Yemen, U.S. Ambassador to Kuwait, Deputy Chief of Mission at Embassy Cairo, Political Minister Counselor at Embassy Baghdad, and Deputy Chief of Mission at Embassy Kuwait.  His Washington assignments have included serving as the Deputy Director in the Office of Northern Gulf Affairs and as the Egypt Desk Officer.

Ambassador Tueller holds a B.A. from Brigham Young University and a M.P.P. from Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government.

(Source: U.S. Embassy in Iraq)

By Hamdi Malik for Al Monitor. Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

ExxonMobil evacuated dozens of its non-Iraqi employees from Iraq on May 18. The evacuation follows a US State Department decision to withdraw its non-essential staff from the US Embassy in Baghdad and its consulate in Erbil, the capital of Iraqi Kurdistan.

The US oil company relocated its employees to Dubai, where they will continue their work related to the West Qurna-1 oil field in Basra. The company announced May 31 that it will begin returning its employees from June 2 after the Iraqi government promised to increase the security measures in the site.

Click here to read the full story.

The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) hosted a workshop in Erbil, in the Iraqi Kurdistan region, on May 14, 2019, to discuss USAID’s New Partnership Initiative (NPI) with 30 local and faith-based Iraqi organizations.

USAID will co-create with successful applicants to award $3 million dollars by the end of this U.S. Government’s Fiscal Year to local and faith-based organizations.

The Iraq NPI Addendum will allow USAID to work directly with a more diverse range of partners in its continuing efforts to help religious and ethnic minority communities in Northern Iraq recover from the genocide perpetrated by the so-call Islamic State in Iraq and Syria.

The principles behind NPI appear in the Agency’s first-ever Acquisition and Assistance (A&A) Strategy.

The overall Agency NPI seeks to support governments, civil society, and the private sector in our partner countries’ as they make progress on the Journey to Self-Reliance, achieve sustainable and resilient results, and generate measurable impact.

(Source: USAID)

By John Lee.

Amnesty International has challenged a statement from the US-led Coalition in which it acknowledges at least 1,302 unintended civilian deaths during Operation Inherent Resolve.

The organisation’s Senior Crisis Response Adviser, Donatella Rovera, said:

While all admissions of responsibility by the US-led Coalition for civilian casualties are welcome, the Coalition remains deeply in denial about the devastating scale of the civilian casualties caused by their operations in both Iraq and Syria.

“A comprehensive investigation by Amnesty International in partnership with Airwars, launched last month, revealed that more than 1,600 civilians were killed in the Raqqa offensive alone in 2017 – meaning the acknowledged deaths are just a fraction of the total numbers killed.

“Today’s acknowledgement of further civilian deaths underscores the urgent need for thorough, independent investigations that can uncover the true scale of civilian casualties caused by Coalition strikes, examine whether each attack complied with international humanitarian law and provide full reparation to victims.

“Even in cases where the Coalition has admitted responsibility this has only happened after civilian deaths were investigated and brought to its attention by organizations such as Amnesty International and Airwars. The Coalition has so far failed to carry out investigations on the ground or provide reasons for the civilian casualties. Without a clear examination of what went wrong in each case lessons can never be learned.

The full statement from Operation Inherent Resolve is shown below:

Since the beginning of operations in 2014, the Coalition and partner forces have liberated nearly 110,000 square kilometers (42,471 square miles) from Daesh, eliminating their self-proclaimed territorial caliphate and freeing 7.7 million people from Daesh oppression. The Coalition will continue to work with partner forces to deny Daesh any physical space and influence in the region as well as deny Daesh the resources they need to resurge.

The Coalition continues to employ thorough and deliberate targeting and strike processes to minimize the impact of operations on civilian populations and infrastructure. This process includes thorough review and vetting of each target package prior to a strike and another review after that strike. Regular strike reports make Coalition activities publicly accessible, and monthly publication of civilian casualty reports makes civilian casualty assessments similarly accessible to the public.

As demonstrated, the Coalition is willing to consider new civilian casualty allegations as well as new or  compelling evidence on past allegations to establish accountability based on the best available evidence.

The Coalition conducted 34,502 strikes between August 2014 and the end of April 2019. During this period, based on information available, CJTF-OIR assesses at least 1,302* civilians have been unintentionally killed by Coalition strikes since the beginning of Operation Inherent Resolve. This report includes three credible reports that had not been previously reported in monthly CIVCAS releases.

In the month of April, CJTF-OIR carried over 122 open reports from previous months and received seven new reports. CJTF-OIR completed 18 civilian-casualty allegation assessment reports. Out of the 18 completed casualty allegation reports, three reports were determined to be credible and resulted in five unintentional civilian deaths. The remaining 15 reports were assessed to be non-credible. One hundred and eleven reports are still open, including three that had been previously closed but were reopened due to the availability of new information.

Credible Reports–In the three incidents assessed in April and the three previously unreported incidents, the investigations assessed that the Coalition took all feasible precautions, and the decision to strike complied with the law of armed conflict. Coalition forces work diligently to be precise during the planning and execution of strikes to reduce the risk of harm to civilians.

Apr. 9, 2016, near Mosul, Iraq, via Airwars report. Coalition aircraft conducted an airstrike on a Daesh communication center in Mosul, Iraq. Regrettably, five civilians were unintentionally killed and nine others unintentionally wounded due to their proximity to the strike. (Not previously reported)
Jan. 17, 2017, near Idlib, Syria, via self-report. Coalition aircraft conducted a strike against a Daesh vehicle. Regrettably, three civilians were unintentionally wounded due to their proximity to the strike. (Not previously reported)
Mar. 27, 2017, near Idlib, Syria, via self-report. Coalition aircraft conducted a strike against a Daesh vehicle. Regrettably, three civilians were unintentionally killed and one civilian was injured due to their proximity to the strike. (Not previously reported)
Dec. 24, 2017, near Kharayij, Syria, via self-report. Coalition aircraft conducted strikes on a Daesh weapons storage facility and Daesh terrorists. Regrettably, three civilians were unintentionally killed due to the proximity of the strikes.
Aug. 1, 2018, near Ash Shajlah, Syria, via self-report. Coalition aircraft conducted a strike against a Daesh staging area. Regrettably, two civilians were unintentionally killed due to the proximity of the strike.
Mar. 10, 2019, near Qayyarah-West Airfield, Iraq, via media-report. Regrettably, one civilian was unintentionally injured by Coalition small arms fire.    Non Credible Reports– After a thorough review of the facts and circumstances of each civilian casualty report, CJTF-OIR assessed the following 15 reports as non-credible. At this time there is insufficient information to assess that, more likely than not, a Coalition strike resulted in civilian casualties.
Aug. 20, 2017, near al-Bado neighborhood, Raqqah, Syria, via Airwars report. After a review of all available strike records it was determined that, more likely than not, civilian casualties did not occur as a result of a Coalition strike.
Aug. 20, 2017, near al-Sakhani neighborhood, Raqqah, Syria, via Airwars report. After a review of all available strike records it was determined that, more likely than not, civilian casualties did not occur as a result of a Coalition strike.
Sept. 18, 2017, near al-Kahraba neighborhood, Raqqah, Syria, via Airwars report. After a review of all available strike records it was determined that, more likely than not, civilian casualties did not occur as a result of a Coalition strike.
Feb. 2, 2018, near al-Bahra, Syria, via Airwars report. After a review of all available strike records it was determined that, more likely than not, civilian casualties did not occur as a result of a Coalition strike.
May 31, 2018, near al-Susah, Syria, via Airwars report. After a review of all available strike records it was determined that, more likely than not, civilian casualties did not occur as a result of a Coalition strike.
July 22, 2018, near al-Susah, Syria, via social media report. After a review of all available strike records it was determined that, more likely than not, civilian casualties did not occur as a result of a Coalition strike.
Aug. 23, 2018, near Abu Kamal, Syria, via self-report. After a review of available information it was assessed that no Coalition strikes were conducted in the geographical area that corresponds to the report of civilian casualties.
Oct. 20, 2018, near al-Susah, Syria, via social media report. After a review of all available strike records it was determined that, more likely than not, civilian casualties did not occur as a result of a Coalition strike.
Mar. 11, 2019, near al-Baghouz, Syria, via social media report. The report contains insufficient information of the time, location and details to assess its credibility.
Mar. 13, 2019, near al-Baghouz, Syria, via Airwars report. The report contains insufficient information of the time, location and details to assess its credibility.
Mar. 14, 2019, near al-Baghouz, Syria, via social media report. The report contains insufficient information of the time, location and details to assess its credibility.
Mar. 16, 2019, near al-Baghouz, Syria, via Airwars report. The report contains insufficient information of the time, location and details to assess its credibility.
Mar. 17, 2019, near al-Baghouz, Syria, via social media report. The report contains insufficient information of the time, location and details to assess its credibility.
Mar. 18, 2019, near al-Baghouz, Syria, via Airwars report. The report contains insufficient information of the time, location and details to assess its credibility.
Mar. 24, 2019, near al-Rutba, Syria, via Airwars report. The report contains insufficient information of the time, location and details to assess its credibility.
Open Reports– CJTF-OIR is still assessing 111 reports of civilian casualties:

Nov. 7, 2014, near Al-Tanak Oilfield, Syria, via Syrian Human Rights Network report.
Dec. 28, 2014, near Jarabulus, Syria, via Airwars report.
Aug. 24, 2015, near Mosul, Iraq, via Airwars report.
Oct. 30, 2015, near Qayyarah, Iraq, via media report.
Nov. 7, 2015, near Qayyarah, Iraq, via media report.
Dec. 24, 2015, near Manbij, Syria, via self-report.
June 1, 2016, near Mosul, Iraq, via Airwars report.
Sept. 22, 2016, near Qayyarah, Iraq, via media report.
Oct. 13, 2016, near Qayyarah, Iraq, via media report.
Jan. 3, 2017, near Sarmada, Syria, via social media report (previously closed, but reopened due to new information).
Jan. 6, 2017, near Taftanaz, Idlib, Syria, via Airwars report.
Jan. 11, 2017, near Saraqib, Idlib, Syria, via Airwars report.
Jan. 14, 2017, near Al Mayadin, Syria, via Airwars report.
Jan. 17, 2017, near Baysan neighborhood, Mosul, Iraq, via social media report (previously closed, but reopened due to new information).
Jan. 26, 2017, near Mosul, Iraq, via Airwars report.
Feb. 3, 2017, near Sarmin, Idlib, Syria, via Airwars report.
Feb. 10, 2017, near Hatra, Iraq, via Airwars report.
Mar. 8, 2017, near Al Karamah, Syria via Airwars report.
Mar. 11, 2017, near Al Karamah, Syria, via Airwars report.
Mar. 23, 2017, near al-Yarmouk neighborhood, Mosul, Iraq, via self-report.
Mar. 25, 2017, near Al Mayadin, Syria, via Airwars report.
Mar. 27, 2017, near Sarmada, Idlib, via Airwars report.
Apr. 5, 2017, near al-Shafa neighborhood, Mosul, Iraq, via Airwars report.
Apr. 7, 2017, near Hamra Ghanim, Syria, via Airwars report.
Apr. 11, 2017, near al-Yarmouk neighborhood, Mosul, Iraq, via Airwars report.
Apr. 11, 2017, near al-Sahab neighborhood, Mosul, Iraq, via Airwars report.
Apr. 19, 2017, near al-Thawra neighborhood, Mosul, Iraq, via Airwars report.
Apr. 28, 2017, near al-Tabaqah, Syria, via Airwars report.
May 6, 2017, near Mayadin, Syria, via Airwars report.
May 9, 2017, near Abu Kamal, Syria, via Airwars report.
May 13, 2017, near Between two Bridges, Raqqah, Syria, via Airwars report.
May 28, 2017, near Al Mansoura, Syria, via Airwars report.
June 3, 2017, near Hawi al Hawa, Syria, via Airwars report.
June 3, 2017, near al Jisr al Qadim, Raqqah, Syria, via Airwars report.
June 4, 2017, near Abu al Naital, Syria, via Airwars report.
June 10, 2017 near Euphrates River, Syria via Amnesty International report.
June 12, 2017, near al-Tib al-Hadeeth area, Raqqah, Syria via Airwars report.
June 13, 2017 near Kasrat Sheikh Jum’ah Syria, via Airwars report.
June 17, 2017, near Hawijah al-Swafi, Raqqah, Syria via Airwars report.
June 18, 2017, near al-Firdous neighborhood, Raqqah, Syria, via Airwars report.
June 18, 2017, near al-Meshahda neighborhood, Mosul, Iraq, via Airwars report.
June 21, 2017, near Amn al-Dawlah neighborhood, Raqqah, Syria, via Airwars report.
June 23, 2017, near al-Saa’a neighborhood, Mosul, Iraq via Airwars report.
June 23, 2017, near Abu Kamal, Syria via Airwars report (previously closed, but reopened due to new information).
June 24, 2017, near Adnan al-Maliki school, Raqqah, Syria via Airwars report.
June 26, 2017, near Al Mayadin, Syria via Airwars report.
June 26, 2017, near Euphrates River, Raqqah, Syria, via Airwars report.
June 27, 2017, near Euphrates River, Raqqah, Syria, via Airwars report.
June 30, 2017, near Al Dashaisha, Syria via Airwars report.
July 2, 2017, near Al Soor, Syria via Airwars report.
July 13, 2017, near Raqqah, Syria via Airwars report.
July 23, 2017, near Nazlet Shahata, Syria via Airwars report.
Aug. 5, 2017, near Raqqah, Syria via Airwars report.
Aug. 11, 2017, near Raqqah, Syria, via Airwars report.
Aug. 23, 2017, near Karabla, al Qaiem, Iraq via Airwars report.
Aug. 23, 2017, near Raqqah, Syria via Airwars report.
Sept. 4, 2017, near Raqqah, Syria via Airwars report.
Sept. 5, 2017, near Raqqah, Syria, via media report.
Sept. 17, 2017, near Abu Kamal, Syria, via Airwars report.
Sept. 18, 2017, near al Mrashdah village, Albu Kamal, Syria, via Airwars report.
Sept. 19, 2017, near Raqqah, Syria, via Airwars report.
Oct. 10, 2017, near Deir Ez Zor, Syria via self-report.
Oct. 13, 2017, near Husaybah, al Qaiem, Iraq via Airwars report.
Oct. 17, 2017, near Abu Kamal, Syria via self-report.
Nov. 14, 2017, near al-Hawaij village, Syria, via Airwars report.
Nov. 26, 2017, near Daranj, Syria, via Airwars report.
Nov. 28, 2017, near El Qata, Syria, via self-report.
Dec. 1, 2017, near Granij, Syria, via Airwars report.
Dec. 5, 2017, near al-Jarthi, Syria, via Airwars report.
Dec. 10, 2017, near Abu Hamam, Syria, via Airwars report.
Dec. 22, 2017, near Hajin, Syria, via Airwars report.
Dec. 29, 2017, near al-Bahra, Syria, via Airwars report.
Feb. 6, 2018, near al-Shafaa, Syria, via self-report.
Feb. 28, 2018, near al-Sha’fah village, Syria, via Airwars report.
Mar. 2, 2018, near al-Bajari, Syria, via Airwars report.
May 10, 2018, near al Khatuniyah, Syria, via self-report.
May 27, 2018, near al-Soussa, Syria, via Airwars report.
June 12, 2018, near Hassoun al-Basha village, Syria, via Airwars report.
June 13, 2018, near al-Sousa, Syria, via Airwars report.
June 21, 2018, near al-Sha’fah, Syria, via Airwars report.
July 16, 2018, near Deir Ezzor, Syria, via self-report.
Nov. 12, 2018, near Hajin, via social media report
Nov. 14, 2018, near Abu Kamal and Al Baghouz, via social media report.
Nov. 17, 2018, near Abu al-Hasan, Syria, via Syrian Observatory for Human Rights report.
Nov. 25, 2018, near Al- Sha’fa, Syria, via social media report.
Nov.29, 2018, near Al-Sha’fa, Syria, via social media report.
Nov. 29, 2018, near Al-Kashma, Syria, via social media report.
Dec. 10, 2018, near al-Kashmah, Syria, via social media report.
Dec. 12, 2018, near Hajin, Syria, via self-report.
Dec. 12, 2018, near Abu Kamal, Syria, via self-report.
Dec. 20, 2018, near al-Shafaa, Syria, via social media report.
Jan. 04, 2019, near al-Shafaa, Syria, via self-report.
Jan. 05, 2019, near al-Mrashdah, Syria, via self-report.
Jan. 10, 2019, near al-Shajlah, Syria, via self-report.
Jan. 10, 2019, near al-Susah, Syria, via self-report.
Jan. 18, 2019, near al-Baghouz, Abu Kamal, Syria, via social media report.
Jan. 20, 2019, near al-Shajlah, Syria, via self-report.
Jan. 22, 2019, near al-Shajlah, Syria, via social media report.
Jan. 23, 2019, near al-Baghouz, Syria, via social media report.
Jan. 25, 2019, near al-Baghouz Fawqani, Syria, via self-report.
Jan. 25, 2019, near al-Mrashdah, Syria, via self-report.
Feb. 6, 2019, near al-Busayrah, Syria, via self-report.
Feb. 10, 2019, near Omer Oil fields, Syria, via media report and Airwars report.
Feb. 11, 2019, near al-Baghouz, Syria, via social media report.
Feb. 12, 2019, near al-Baghouz, Syria, via social media report.
Mar. 2, 2019, near al-Baghouz Fawqani, Syria, via self-report.
Mar. 7, 2019, near al-Baghouz camp, Syria, via Airwars report.
Mar. 13, 2019, near al-Baghouz, Syria, via Airwars report.
Mar. 18, 2019, near al-Baghouz Fawqani, Syria, via self-report.
Mar. 20, 2019, near Anbar province, Iraq, via self-report.
Apr. 15, 2019, near al-Sha’afa, Syria, via social media report.

*During a recent internal database audit, the CJTF-OIR CIVCAS Cell discovered an administrative error involving a 2017 allegation – Feb. 22, 2017, near Mosul, Iraq, via self-report: During a strike on ISIS fighters in a moving vehicle, it was assessed that one civilian was unintentionally killed when he entered the target area after the munition was released (Reported Apr. 30, 2017). The Public Affairs release was correct; however, the affected civilian was not recorded in the database correctly.

(Sources: US Dept of Defense, Amnesty International)

GE Power (NYSE: GE) has installed and commissioned a new advanced 9E gas turbine at the Iraqi Ministry of Electricity’s (MoE) Al Qudus Power Plant.

The site was previously capable of generating up to 1,125 megawatts (MW) of power. With the addition of the new turbine, it can generate an additional 125 MW, which will contribute to meeting the higher demand for power during the summer months. GE is also providing maintenance services, parts and rehabilitation works at the site, helping to enhance the reliability of operations at the plant and maintain a stable supply of electricity over the course of the year.

Musaab al-Mudarris, Director of the Media Department of the Iraqi Ministry of Electricity said:

Delivering additional power for the hot summer months is a priority for the Ministry of Electricity. One of the quickest and most cost-effective means of adding efficient, reliable power to the national grid is to enhance the productivity of existing power generation facilities.

“GE can help us meet this objective with its industry-leading solutions, large installed base of power generation equipment across Iraq and local team of experts. The successful delivery, installation and commissioning of a new gas turbine at Al Qudus Power Plant just 5 months after the contract was awarded is a testament to the Ministry and GE’s joint commitment to powering Iraq.”

GE’s 9E technology is capable of running on more than 50 different kinds of fuel. This provides the MOE with the flexibility to operate the unit on the most economical source available and to keep generating power using liquid fuels when gas is unavailable.

Joseph Anis, President and CEO of GE’s Gas Power Systems and Power Services businesses in the Middle East and South Asia, said:

“GE is committed to delivering reliable, efficient and affordable power to help the Iraqi people strengthen their economy, re-build conflict-affected areas and support progress for present and future generations. Our teams were among the first to enter Mosul after its liberation, helping to rehabilitate the Al Qayara power plant; we are supporting the development of the country’s largest power plant in Baghdad province; and we have facilitated the Ministry of Finance to unlock over $2 billion of funding for the power sector.

“We have a strong, successful track record of delivering results under the toughest of conditions across Iraq and remain committed to building upon this legacy.”

GE employs up to 300 people in Iraq, more than 90 percent of whom are Iraqi nationals, and has supported the development of Iraq’s energy sector for more than 50 years. From Zakho to Basra, GE-built solutions are helping to enable growth, health, connection and safety in communities across Iraq.

Today, GE-built technologies contribute up to 55 percent of Iraq’s current electricity production, GE and its partners power more than 90 percent of the aircrafts operated by Iraqi Airways and nearly 4,000 GE Healthcare products are deployed in hospitals and clinics across Iraq.

(Source: GE)