The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) is rehabilitating 15,000 houses in West Mosul, bringing the total number of houses in its stabilization portfolio to more than 30,000 – the largest of its kind in Iraq.

The project in West Mosul covers 29 neighbourhoods that were hardest hit during the fight to liberate the city from the Islamic State, including the Old City where the militants declared their caliphate. It will enable 90,000 people to return home.

“This rehabilitation project is a critical step for families wanting to settle back into their homes in Mosul after three years of turmoil and hardship,” says Head of UNDP’s Stabilization programme, Dr. Mohammed siddig Mudawi.

“We know it works. Through our successful projects in Ramadi and Fallujah, as well as Bartella and Bashiqa in the Ninewa Plains, we’ve witnessed first-hand the transformative impact that our housing rehabilitation work has had on communities,” he adds.

Priority for housing is given to the most vulnerable – female-headed households, households run by a minor, people living with a disability, and households where the breadwinner has not had employment in the last three years.

Essential elements such as rebuilding and plastering walls, securing windows and doors, undertaking electrical work and restoring sanitation are incorporated into the rehabilitation, plus additional items for people living with a disability, such as ramps and seated toilets.

Neighbourhoods were selected in consultation with the provincial government and Mayor’s office based on numbers of returnees and level of damage sustained. All housing repairs are agreed to by the homeowner and the local Muktar prior to commencement, and work is monitored by government-appointed committees.

Rehabilitation of the first group of houses will be complete by end of March. The entire project is scheduled to be completed by November 2019.

Approximately 800 stabilization projects have been completed or are underway by UNDP in Mosul, including restoring water and electricity networks, rebuilding educational institutions and healthcare facilities, and providing employment for locals to clear rubble from streets.

Photos of the West Mosul housing project are available here to download. Contact Fay Daoud on the details below if you would like to use any photos.

(Source: UNDP)

The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) is rehabilitating 15,000 houses in West Mosul, bringing the total number of houses in its stabilization portfolio to more than 30,000 – the largest of its kind in Iraq.

The project in West Mosul covers 29 neighbourhoods that were hardest hit during the fight to liberate the city from the Islamic State, including the Old City where the militants declared their caliphate. It will enable 90,000 people to return home.

“This rehabilitation project is a critical step for families wanting to settle back into their homes in Mosul after three years of turmoil and hardship,” says Head of UNDP’s Stabilization programme, Dr. Mohammed siddig Mudawi.

“We know it works. Through our successful projects in Ramadi and Fallujah, as well as Bartella and Bashiqa in the Ninewa Plains, we’ve witnessed first-hand the transformative impact that our housing rehabilitation work has had on communities,” he adds.

Priority for housing is given to the most vulnerable – female-headed households, households run by a minor, people living with a disability, and households where the breadwinner has not had employment in the last three years.

Essential elements such as rebuilding and plastering walls, securing windows and doors, undertaking electrical work and restoring sanitation are incorporated into the rehabilitation, plus additional items for people living with a disability, such as ramps and seated toilets.

Neighbourhoods were selected in consultation with the provincial government and Mayor’s office based on numbers of returnees and level of damage sustained. All housing repairs are agreed to by the homeowner and the local Muktar prior to commencement, and work is monitored by government-appointed committees.

Rehabilitation of the first group of houses will be complete by end of March. The entire project is scheduled to be completed by November 2019.

Approximately 800 stabilization projects have been completed or are underway by UNDP in Mosul, including restoring water and electricity networks, rebuilding educational institutions and healthcare facilities, and providing employment for locals to clear rubble from streets.

Photos of the West Mosul housing project are available here to download. Contact Fay Daoud on the details below if you would like to use any photos.

(Source: UNDP)

By John Lee.

The United Nations has advertised new positions in Iraqi Kurdistan:

(Source: UN)

(Picture: Success, growth, career, development signpost from 3D_Creation/Shutterstock)

Denmark provides an additional $4 million to Security Sector Reform in Iraq

The Government of Denmark will contribute an additional 27 million Danish Kroner (approx. USD 4 million) to advance Security and Justice Sector Reform in Iraq in the coming years.

This support will be managed and facilitated by United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).

UNDP Security Sector Reform/ Rule of Law Programme provides advice to Government of Iraq’s Security Sector Reform Programme through partnerships with the Office of the National Security Advisor, Ministry of Interior, Higher Judicial Council, Ministry of Justice, Parliamentary Security and Defense Committee, Iraqi civil society organizations and, other international donors.

The Danish grant will, among others, be used to support implementation of the Local Police Road Map, for development of quick impact projects to improve police – public partnerships, and for mid-level management and, related specialized trainings to Iraqi police officers in close collaboration between Danish National Police, UNDP and the Ministry of Interior. Denmark has supported Iraq’s security and justice sector reform efforts since 2015.

Danish Ambassador Gert Meinecke said “Denmark maintains its commitment to supporting Iraq’s transition to stability, security and recovery”.

While visiting a mid-level management training course at the Ministry of Interior, the Danish Ambassador expressed hope that the trained Iraqi Police Officers will provide a safer and more secure day-to-day environment for the people of Iraq. “The strengthening of local police is important in the transition from ‘green to blue’ security”. added Ambassador Meinecke.

Mr. Vakhtang Svanidze, Officer in Charge of UNDP Iraq said “I would like to thank the Government of Denmark for its generous contribution of 27 Million Danish Kroner which comes in addition to the in- kind support of the Danish police advisor and, expert trainers”. “Improving key public security services such as policing and justice services in the liberated and, other areas will be a key determiner to Iraq’s transition to stability and, maintain safe returns” added Mr. Svanidze.

UNDP is very grateful to the Government of Denmark’s committed and generous contributions to UNDP Security Sector Reform/ Rule of Law Programme in Iraq.

(Source: UNDP)

By John Lee.

The United Nations has advertised new positions in Iraqi Kurdistan:

(Source: UN)

(Picture: Success, growth, career, development signpost from 3D_Creation/Shutterstock)

The United Nations Mine Action Service (UNMAS) welcomes the contribution of SEK 75 million (approximately USD 8.3 million) from the Government of Sweden on mitigating the threat from explosive hazards in support of enhanced provision, facilitation and enablement of humanitarian and stabilization support.

Approximately 1.8 million people are estimated to be internally displaced persons (IDPs) in Iraq, equating to 18 percent of the Iraqis who live in conflict-affected areas, and more than 5 percent of the overall population. According to an assessment carried out in 2018, on average and across affected areas, 22% of IDPs in camps cite explosive hazards as a main reason for not intending to return to their areas of origin, rising up to 52% in some governorates.

In addition, 12% of out-of-camp IDPs cite the same. As for those who do choose to return, do so in potentially unsafe environments contaminated by explosive hazards (Multi-Cluster Needs Assessment VI led by the Assessment Working Group and facilitated by REACH, September 2018).

UNMAS Iraq, working in tandem with its implementing partners, continues to maintain a weighted presence in Iraq, especially in the areas liberated from the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL). Through strategic partnerships and engagement of both internal and external stakeholders, and in support of the Government of Iraq and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), UNMAS has so far cleared over 1,100 sites of critical infrastructure. These include bridges, water plants, power plants, hospitals, schools, etc. that were once the strongholds of ISIL and which were littered with explosive hazards after their defeat.

With this contribution from Sweden, UNMAS will be able to better support communities with explosive hazard management, risk education, and capacity enhancement initiatives in support of the Iraqi government.

The contribution comes in concert with a recent field visit organized for representatives of the Government of Sweden, including the Swedish Ambassador to Iraq Mr. Pontus Melander, to Sinjar and Kocho in the Sinjar District of the Ninewa governorate. During the visit, the delegation gained a first-hand insight on UNMAS planned clearance activities inside the district’s most damaged area, with its scale of destruction and contamination continuing to be prime inhibitors for the safe, dignified and voluntary return of IDPs to their homes.

His Excellency Mr. Pontus Melander said:

“As we have seen firsthand, it is painfully clear how explosive hazards prevent humanitarian assistance, reconstruction and the safe return of internally displaced persons. Sweden proudly supports UNMAS’ critical work, as well as the efforts of the Government of Iraq, with explosive hazards management and demining. These efforts are crucial for both the delivery of humanitarian assistance and protection of civilians, as well as being a precondition for safe reconstruction and returns.”

Pehr Lodhammar, Senior Programme Manager of UNMAS in Iraq, added:

The severity of explosive hazard contamination in ISIL-affected areas in Iraq cannot be understated. The methods and explosive devices used by ISIL are unlike any we have seen previously. They planted, sometimes very complex improvised explosive devices, across all areas previously under their control. These devices are constituting a threat to returning populations and humanitarian actors, still, and long after ISIL were defeated.

“This new funding from Sweden will go a long way in ensuring that UNMAS can provide the support needed to ensure the safe return of IDPs to their communities.

(Source: UN)

In order to strengthen the bidders knowledge of UNDP tendering process/e-tendering and procurement rules and regulations, , UNDP Country Office Iraq is planning to conduct two training workshops  for all interested  firms/companies as per the following details:

  1. Training session – 12 February 2019 – Erbil
  2. Training session – 21 February 2019 – Baghdad

All interested firms/companies are kindly requested to send the following information to the UNDP focal point:

  1. Name of the company;
  2. Name of Representative/s (Maximum of two person allowed to take part in the training session).

1. Firms/Companies in Erbil: Sana Jalal: sana.jalal@undp.org
2. Firms/Companies in Baghdad: Sura Aljuboori: sura.aljuboori@undp.org

Nota Bene: The training venue will only be communicated to the firms/companies which will show their interest to participate in the workshops by sending an email to the above focal points.

(Source: UNDP)

By John Lee.

The United Nations has advertised new positions in Iraq:

(Source: UN)

(Picture: Finger pressing a new career start button, from Olivier Le Moal/Shutterstock)

A new UK aid package is to help the Government of Iraq to reinvigorate its economy and rebuild hospitals, schools and other vital infrastructure, allowing Iraqis displaced by conflict to return home and restart their lives, UK Minister for the Middle East Alistair Burt announced during a four-day visit to Iraq.

The UK is the first donor to the newly formed Iraq Reform and Reconstruction Fund (IRRF), following close cooperation between the Department for International Development (DFID), the Government of Iraq, the World Bank, Germany and other international partners to develop the fund.

The fund will:

  • encourage innovative approaches and provide technical assistance to the Government of Iraq as it reconstructs areas affected by conflict, including the rebuilding of houses, schools, hospitals, factories and roads.
  • provide opportunities to utilise UK and international expertise to help the Government of Iraq to carry out vital reforms that will make the country more business friendly.
  • help unlock Iraq’s economic potential, generate jobs, boost potential for enhanced future trade with the UK and other international partners and lay the ground-work for long-term peace and stability following the conflict with Daesh.

In addition to tackling Iraq’s long-term recovery and reconstruction, Mr. Burt also announced further support to help meet the immediate humanitarian needs of the 1.8 million people still displaced from their homes within Iraq, and a boost for stabilisation efforts to ensure vital services such as healthcare and electricity are reinstated quickly in places such as Mosul.

During the visit in which Iraq and the UK agreed to a joint communique to further strengthen bilateral relations, Mr Burt held wide ranging discussions on UK-Iraqi cooperation, trade, development and regional security issues with the Iraqi President Barham Salih, the Prime Minister Adil Abdul Mehdi, Foreign Minister, Deputy Foreign Minister and the Trade and Planning ministers.

He also met Prime Minister of the Kurdistan Regional Government, Nechirvan Barzani, and the Prime-Minister designate, Masrour Barzani. Whilst in the Kurdistan Region, the minister also met Minister for the Interior, and for Peshmerga Affairs Karim Sinjari, as well as Deputy Prime Minister Qubad Talabani.

In support of the Foreign Secretary’s commitment to tackle the persecution of Christians across the globe, the minister also engaged with the Archbishop of Erbil, Bashar Warda and grassroots faith organisations to gain their perspectives on freedom of religion and beliefs in the region.

Speaking from Baghdad the Minister for the Middle East Alistair Burt said:

The UK is a strong partner and friend of Iraq. We share a range of mutual and growing priorities which include security, development, foreign policy and trade.

“There is much to be celebrated about Iraq’s progress since the territorial defeat of Daesh in 2017. But there is more to be done to help Iraq develop the strong, stable future, decided on by all Iraqis, that its people deserve. The UK remains committed to supporting Iraq to develop along non-sectarian lines, and we are particularly concerned about the rights and freedoms afforded to Christians and other minority faith groups.

“I am proud that we will be the first donor to the Iraq Reform and Reconstruction Fund. UK aid will provide vital support to the people of Iraq as they rebuild their lives, their businesses and their economic independence.

UK aid announced today for the humanitarian response will support vulnerable people displaced by conflict, providing clean water, medicine and shelter. Since 2014, UK aid in Iraq has provided 4.1 million people with life-saving healthcare, 2 million people with safe water and sanitation, 836,500 people with shelter and more than 408,000 people with food.

£16 million will be allocated to the Iraq Reform and Reconstruction Fund (IRRF), run by the World Bank, from DFID’s budget. The IRRF will support Government of Iraq-led reconstruction efforts following the destruction caused by the conflict with Daesh, and support the implementation of longer term economic reform.

£6.9 million will be allocated to UNDP’s Funding Facility for Stabilisation (FFS) in Iraq from the UK Government’s Conflict, Security and Stability Fund (CSSF). It will directly support the rehabilitation of critical infrastructure in areas of Iraq liberated from Daesh. This will include hospitals, school, power plants and roads destroyed in the fighting.

£10 million will be allocated to UN OCHA’s Iraq Humanitarian Pooled Fund from DFID’s budget. It will support the ongoing humanitarian response, providing for the immediate needs of vulnerable people in Iraq displaced by conflict. It will help deliver clean water, medicine, shelter and a wide range of additional services to people living within temporary camps. Since 2014, UK aid in Iraq has provided 4.1 million people with life-saving healthcare, 2 million people with safe water and sanitation, 836,500 people with shelter and more than 408,000 people with food.

(Source: UK Govt)

By Sundus Abass, SDGs Focal point – UNDP Iraq:

Iraq is one of the developing countries which has a lack of data availability for several Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) indicators. The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), in partnership with local Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs), organized two workshops on how NGOs can have effective role in gathering selected SDGs indicators data.

This initiative came after series of meetings with NGOs and the Iraqi Government representatives towards enabling the social inclusion environment, as Iraq will present its first Voluntary National Reviews (VNR) report at the UN High-Level Political Forum HLPF) in 2019, to share its success and challenges in localization of the 2030 Agenda goals and targets.

The workshops aimed to raise the awareness level of NGOs in the field of SDGs, in particular, SDG 5, as well as emphasize the importance of the partnership between NGOs and the Government on the preparing process of the first Iraq VNR report, and on leaving no one behind.

Although the local NGOs have a distinguish role in drafting shadow reports, such as (Universal Periodic Review (UPR), Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women CEDAW and   Security Council resolution (1325), they faced a huge gap on tackling different issues from SDGs perspective.

The six-day workshops (November 20-22, and December 6-8, 2018) organized in Baghdad engaged about 34 representatives from different national and international NGOs across Iraq, with multi working backgrounds. The workshop assessed and discussed the roles of NGOs in the SDGs localizations, in order to meet the country’s challenges of the transition from a crisis context to sustainable development.

After a brief presentation of SDGs, with a significant focus on SDG5 and SDG16 targets and indicators, the participants were divided into three working groups to discuss the applicability, needs, gender equality, peace, justice and good governance. These working groups allowed the participant to deepen their knowledge of the SDGs, raising awareness about SDGs implementation and help them to connect their own activities as non-governmental players with Agenda 2030.

Based on deep discussions on the role of civil society in peace building and in drafting the national framework for recovery and development, Participants set the priorities and mechanisms which are related to the economic empowerment of women, gender equality, and promote the establishment of peaceful societies.

They agreed to establish NGOs Alliance under the tittle “Sustainable Development Network 2030” which will be working on promoting sustainable development goals in different governmental and non-governmental sectors. This initiative emphasized the importance of involving NGOs with the government, particularly, with Ministry of Planning to participate in the preparation process of the development plans and strategies, as NGOs can provide support and technical assistance through communication and coordination.

The Chief of Hawa Organization for Relief and Development, one of the main local NGOs partner with UNDP, Buthinaa Mahomuad said: “we commend the usual effort of UNDP to support the NGOs on launching a roadmap for SDGs localization in Iraq, to be integrated with the Government as NGOs were unaware of the importance of Agenda 2030”. In addition, SDGs focal point in UNDP –Iraq, Ms. Sundus Abass mentioned that: “our prioritized target is to domesticate SDGs successfully in Iraq, which should be done through leaving no one behind and especially the NGOs”.

The first activity that had been launched by the Sustainable Development Network 2030, on January 2019, was the informal data collection for SDG 16 indicators. As Facebook is one of the most used social media platforms in Iraq, it had been used by the network to gather data related to SDG 16 indicators, through a questionnaire form that had been prepared via the national VNR committee.

The Sustainable Development Network 2030 developed the questionnaire form and published it to various local NGOs, youth, and academia pages on Facebook with an encouragement for the audience to share their experience. more than 1000 people respond to the questionnaire within the first three weeks of January 2019. The collected data was sent to the Central Statistics Bureau to analyze it and send it back to the VNR committee, to be used for first Iraq VNR, which is considered as the first action towards the establishment of the principles of leaving no one behind in the country.

(Source: UNDP)