The coalition continues to help forces in both Iraq and Syria establish security and stability in areas that have known nothing but oppression since the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria reared its head five years ago, the spokesman for Operation Inherent Resolve said on Tuesday.

Speaking to Pentagon reporters from Baghdad, Army Col. Sean Ryan noted that Iraqi forces are working together across the country to rid the nation of the last remnants of the terrorist group.

“The various security elements — to include the [Iraqi forces], the peshmerga, counterterrorism services and the federal police — are all working together to continue securing their country,” he said.

In Ninevah province, Iraqi forces continue to find and disarm improvised explosive devices and continue to root out ISIS holdouts. In the mountains of Kirkuk, the Iraqi federal police and the Kurdish peshmerga work together to secure remote villages.

Out west, in Anbar province, border security forces continue to prevent ISIS fighters from streaming into the country, the colonel said.

“For its part, the coalition is … enabling the [Iraqi] efforts to secure Iraq by advising strategic leaders, training thousands of Iraqi service members and divesting equipment they need to effectively secure their country,” he said.

Coalition members also continue to train Iraqi forces. Since the effort started in 2015, coalition forces have trained more than 175,000 Iraqis in basic soldier skills and specialized fields such as intelligence, law enforcement, medical support and aviation.

Syria

In Syria, the picture is more complex and dangerous. Ground operations for Phase 3 of Operation Roundup have begun, and Syrian partner forces continue clearance of the Middle Euphrates River Valley, Ryan said. “Hajin and the surrounding villages are the last remaining territory acquired by ISIS in the coalition’s area of responsibility, and the victory by the Syrian Democratic Forces there will mean that ISIS no longer holds territory,” he added.

ISIS fighters are trying desperately to hang onto the territory, and hard fighting lies ahead, the colonel told reporters. “Despite this, we are confident that the SDF will prevail,” he said.

In Tanf earlier this month, Marines conducted training to reinforce partner forces, he said. “The coalition has supported the SDF through air support, as well as training and equipment,” Ryan said. “Additionally, in liberated areas, the coalition trained internal security forces to maintain the peace and security in liberated cities, provide basic law enforcement support, as well as specialized services such as counter-[improvised explosive devices] and engineering.”

Ryan noted changes in Iraq as Army Lt. Gen. Paul J. LaCamera assumed command of Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve from Army Lt. Gen. Paul E. Funk II.

Ryan said the military stabilization efforts are going well, but are not enough. “Security creates the space for rebuilding,” he explained. “Residents only gain hope for the future when their children can go to school free from harm, women go buy basic necessities in local shops, and when they can go to their jobs that allow them to support their families. Ultimately, the military cannot fight its way to stability.”

The cost of reconstruction is high, with estimates of rebuilding Mosul — Iraq’s second-largest city — pegged at $100 billion. “We call on all nations to help those who have sacrificed tremendously fighting this global threat,” Ryan said.

(Source: US Dept of Defense)

The coalition continues to help forces in both Iraq and Syria establish security and stability in areas that have known nothing but oppression since the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria reared its head five years ago, the spokesman for Operation Inherent Resolve said on Tuesday.

Speaking to Pentagon reporters from Baghdad, Army Col. Sean Ryan noted that Iraqi forces are working together across the country to rid the nation of the last remnants of the terrorist group.

“The various security elements — to include the [Iraqi forces], the peshmerga, counterterrorism services and the federal police — are all working together to continue securing their country,” he said.

In Ninevah province, Iraqi forces continue to find and disarm improvised explosive devices and continue to root out ISIS holdouts. In the mountains of Kirkuk, the Iraqi federal police and the Kurdish peshmerga work together to secure remote villages.

Out west, in Anbar province, border security forces continue to prevent ISIS fighters from streaming into the country, the colonel said.

“For its part, the coalition is … enabling the [Iraqi] efforts to secure Iraq by advising strategic leaders, training thousands of Iraqi service members and divesting equipment they need to effectively secure their country,” he said.

Coalition members also continue to train Iraqi forces. Since the effort started in 2015, coalition forces have trained more than 175,000 Iraqis in basic soldier skills and specialized fields such as intelligence, law enforcement, medical support and aviation.

Syria

In Syria, the picture is more complex and dangerous. Ground operations for Phase 3 of Operation Roundup have begun, and Syrian partner forces continue clearance of the Middle Euphrates River Valley, Ryan said. “Hajin and the surrounding villages are the last remaining territory acquired by ISIS in the coalition’s area of responsibility, and the victory by the Syrian Democratic Forces there will mean that ISIS no longer holds territory,” he added.

ISIS fighters are trying desperately to hang onto the territory, and hard fighting lies ahead, the colonel told reporters. “Despite this, we are confident that the SDF will prevail,” he said.

In Tanf earlier this month, Marines conducted training to reinforce partner forces, he said. “The coalition has supported the SDF through air support, as well as training and equipment,” Ryan said. “Additionally, in liberated areas, the coalition trained internal security forces to maintain the peace and security in liberated cities, provide basic law enforcement support, as well as specialized services such as counter-[improvised explosive devices] and engineering.”

Ryan noted changes in Iraq as Army Lt. Gen. Paul J. LaCamera assumed command of Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve from Army Lt. Gen. Paul E. Funk II.

Ryan said the military stabilization efforts are going well, but are not enough. “Security creates the space for rebuilding,” he explained. “Residents only gain hope for the future when their children can go to school free from harm, women go buy basic necessities in local shops, and when they can go to their jobs that allow them to support their families. Ultimately, the military cannot fight its way to stability.”

The cost of reconstruction is high, with estimates of rebuilding Mosul — Iraq’s second-largest city — pegged at $100 billion. “We call on all nations to help those who have sacrificed tremendously fighting this global threat,” Ryan said.

(Source: US Dept of Defense)

Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve and its partners continue to pursue the lasting defeat of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria in designated parts of Syria and Iraq, Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve officials reported on Monday.

Operation Roundup, which began May 1 to accelerate the defeat of ISIS in the middle Euphrates River valley and Iraq-Syria border region, has continued to gain ground and remove terrorists from the battlefield through offensive operations coupled with precision coalition strike support.

Between Sept. 10-16, coalition military forces conducted 66 strikes, consisting of 102 engagements, in Iraq and Syria

Strikes in Syria

On Sept. 16, coalition military forces conducted six strikes consisting of 13 engagements against ISIS targets near Abu Kamal. The strikes engaged four ISIS tactical units and destroyed an ISIS command-and-control center, an ISIS vehicle bomb facility, a fighting position and an ISIS trench system and suppressed an ISIS mortar.

On Sept. 15, coalition military forces conducted seven strikes consisting of 10 engagements against ISIS targets near Abu Kamal. The strikes engaged four ISIS tactical units and destroyed an ISIS explosive hazard, an ISIS fighting position, an ISIS mortar tube, an ISIS weapons cache and an ISIS heavy machine gun and damaged five ISIS improvised explosive device belts.

On Sept. 14, coalition military forces conducted 14 strikes consisting of 23 engagements against ISIS targets near Abu Kamal. The strikes engaged six ISIS tactical units and destroyed an ISIS vehicle, three ISIS supply routes, an ISIS mortar tube, two ISIS defensive fighting structures, three ISIS fighting positions and an ISIS staging area and suppressed one mortar team.

On Sept. 13, coalition military forces conducted 12 strikes consisting of 15 engagements against ISIS targets near Abu Kamal. The strikes engaged three ISIS tactical units and destroyed nine ISIS supply routes, four ISIS fighting positions, an ISIS compound, an ISIS sentry location, an ISIS staging area and an ISIS counter battery fire, damaged an ISIS compound and suppressed two ISIS mortar firing points.

On Sept. 12, coalition military forces conducted 14 strikes consisting of 26 engagements against ISIS targets near Abu Kamal. The strikes engaged 11 ISIS tactical units and destroyed seven ISIS supply routes and an ISIS command-and-control center.

On Sept. 11, coalition military forces conducted 10 strikes consisting of 11 engagements against ISIS targets near Abu Kamal. The strikes engaged seven ISIS tactical units and destroyed an ISIS heavy weapon, an ISIS technical vehicle and an ISIS engineering equipment and suppressed an ISIS mortar team.

On Sept. 10, coalition military forces conducted a strike consisting of one engagement against ISIS targets near Abu Kamal. The strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed an ISIS crew-served weapon.

Strikes in Iraq

On Sept. 16, coalition military forces conducted a strike consisting of two engagements against ISIS targets near Asad. The strike destroyed an ISIS bunker and an ISIS vehicle shelter.

On Sept. 15, coalition military forces conducted a strike consisting of one engagement against ISIS targets near Kisik. The strike destroyed two ISIS tunnels.

There were no reported strikes conducted in Iraq on Sept. 10-14.

Part of Operation Inherent Resolve

These strikes were conducted as part of Operation Inherent Resolve, the operation to destroy ISIS in Iraq and Syria. The destruction of ISIS targets in Iraq and Syria also further limits the group’s ability to project terror and conduct external operations throughout the region and the rest of the world, task force officials said.

The list above contains all strikes conducted by fighter, attack, bomber, rotary-wing or remotely piloted aircraft; rocket-propelled artillery; and ground-based tactical artillery, officials noted.

A strike, as defined by the coalition, refers to one or more kinetic engagements that occur in roughly the same geographic location to produce a single or cumulative effect.

For example, task force officials explained, a single aircraft delivering a single weapon against a lone ISIS vehicle is one strike, but so is multiple aircraft delivering dozens of weapons against a group of ISIS-held buildings and weapon systems in a compound, having the cumulative effect of making that facility harder or impossible to use. Strike assessments are based on initial reports and may be refined, officials said.

The task force does not report the number or type of aircraft employed in a strike, the number of munitions dropped in each strike, or the number of individual munition impact points against a target.

(Source: US Dept of Defense)

Army Lt. Gen. Paul J. LaCamera, commanding general of the XVIII Airborne Corps, assumed command of Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve from Army Lt. Gen. Paul E. Funk II, the III Armored Corps commanding general, today during a ceremony in Baghdad.

Iraqi security forces partners and distinguished guests joined an audience including U.S. and coalition soldiers, sailors, airmen, Marines and law enforcement officials for the transfer of authority ceremony at the coalition headquarters.

Army Gen. Joseph L. Votel, commanding general for U.S. Central Command, presided over the ceremony. Votel said that he is confident the XVIII Airborne Corps team from Fort Bragg, North Carolina, is ready to continue the fight for the lasting defeat of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria and set conditions for follow-on operations to increase regional stability.

“Lt. Gen. Funk’s team has made tremendous progress,” Votel said. “[From] increasing the capabilities of the ISF, collapsing pockets of ISIS fighters throughout the region, [and] helping to clear Hawijah, Anbar and the Euphrates River valley throughout the past year.”

Votel further remarked on Funk’s leadership with the largest military coalition in history.

Coalition’s Commitment to Defeat ISIS

“CJTF-OIR’s success is a testament to your leadership,” Votel said. “Working by, with, and through brave Iraqi and Syrian partners, the coalition has remained committed to pursuing the lasting defeat of ISIS.”

The XVIII Airborne Corps previously led the CJTF-OIR coalition from Aug. 2016 to Sept. 2017.

Outgoing commanding general Funk took the opportunity to reflect on his command of CJTF-OIR.

“There are two words to describe what has changed in the last four years since the formation of this coalition — honor and hope. Working by, with, and through our Iraqi partners, our efforts helped the Iraqi security forces transform into a confident, professional organization and restore honor to their nation,” Funk said. “In northeast Syria, hope has replaced fear and oppression. While there is still a tough fight ahead, we are confident that XVIII Corps will lead the coalition to secure the lasting defeat of ISIS.”

LaCamera shared his vision for the CJTF-OIR mission ahead.

“As we look to the future,” he said, “we must and will be aggressive and resolute in everything we do to ensure ISIS and its ideology are completely eradicated.”

Since its establishment in June 2014, CJTF-OIR a global coalition consisting of 73 nations and five international organizations, has built and enhanced the capacities of partner forces and significantly degraded the ability of ISIS to recruit, train, plan, resource, inspire and execute attacks worldwide. The coalition’s collective accomplishments include training and equipping more than 170,000 Iraqi security forces and thousands of internal security forces in northeastern Syria; recapturing 99% of the territory previously held by ISIS in Iraq and Syria; and liberating nearly eight million Iraqis and Syrians from ISIS’s brutal rule.

(Source: US Dept of Defense)

 

The coalition and its partners continued to strike Islamic State of Iraq and Syria targets in designated parts of Syria and Iraq between Sept. 3-9, conducting 16 strikes consisting of 22 engagements, Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve officials reported on Monday.

Operation Roundup, which began May 1 to accelerate the defeat of ISIS in the Middle Euphrates River Valley and Iraq-Syria border region, has continued to gain ground and remove terrorists from the battlefield through offensive operations coupled with precision coalition strike support, officials said.

Strikes in Syria

On Sept. 9 near Abu Kamal, coalition military forces conducted three strikes against ISIS targets, destroying an ISIS staging area and an ISIS command-and-control center.

On Sept. 8 near Abu Kamal, coalition military forces conducted a strike consisting of an engagement against ISIS targets, destroying an ISIS weapons cache.

On Sept. 7 near Abu Kamal, coalition military forces conducted two strikes against ISIS targets, destroying an ISIS front-end loader and an ISIS mortar system.

On Sept. 6 near Abu Kamal, coalition military forces conducted one strike against ISIS targets, destroying an ISIS vehicle.

On Sept. 5 near Abu Kamal, coalition military forces conducted one strike against ISIS targets, destroying an ISIS logistics hub.

On Sept. 4 near Abu Kamal, coalition military forces conducted two strikes against ISIS targets, destroying an ISIS supply route and an ISIS logistics hub.

On Sept. 3 near Abu Kamal, coalition military forces conducted two strikes against ISIS targets, destroying two pieces of ISIS engineering equipment.

On Sept. 2 near Abu Kamal, coalition military forces conducted three strikes against ISIS targets, destroying an ISIS supply route, an ISIS vehicle and an ISIS-held building.

Strikes in Iraq

There were no reported strikes conducted in Iraq between Sept. 5-9.

On Sept. 4, coalition military forces conducted two strikes consisting of five engagements against ISIS targets:

  • Near Makhmur, a strike destroyed two ISIS-held buildings and damaged two ISIS-held buildings.
  • Near Kirkuk, a strike damaged three ISIS-held buildings.

On Sept. 3, coalition military forces conducted two strikes consisting of two engagements against ISIS targets:

  • Near Rawah, a strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit.
  • Near Baghdadi, a strike destroyed an ISIS cave.

Part of Operation Inherent Resolve

These strikes were conducted as part of Operation Inherent Resolve, the operation to destroy ISIS in Iraq and Syria. The destruction of ISIS targets in Iraq and Syria also further limits the group’s ability to project terror and conduct external operations throughout the region and the rest of the world, task force officials said.

The list above contains all strikes conducted by fighter, attack, bomber, rotary-wing or remotely piloted aircraft; rocket-propelled artillery; and ground-based tactical artillery, officials noted.

A strike, as defined by the coalition, refers to one or more kinetic engagements that occur in roughly the same geographic location to produce a single or cumulative effect.

For example, task force officials explained, a single aircraft delivering a single weapon against a lone ISIS vehicle is one strike, but so is multiple aircraft delivering dozens of weapons against a group of ISIS-held buildings and weapon systems in a compound, having the cumulative effect of making that facility harder or impossible to use. Strike assessments are based on initial reports and may be refined, officials said.

The task force does not report the number or type of aircraft employed in a strike, the number of munitions dropped in each strike, or the number of individual munition impact points against a target.

(Source: US Dept of Defense)

Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve and its partners continue to pursue the lasting defeat of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria in designated parts of Syria and Iraq, Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve officials reported today.

Operation Roundup, which began May 1 to accelerate the defeat of ISIS in the Middle Euphrates River Valley and Iraq-Syria border region, has continued to gain ground and remove terrorists from the battlefield through offensive operations coupled with precision coalition strike support.

Between Aug. 27-Sept. 2, coalition military forces conducted 30 strikes, consisting of 35 engagements, in Iraq and Syria

Strikes in Syria

There were no reported strikes conducted in Syria yesterday.

On Sept. 1, coalition military forces conducted eight strikes consisting of 11 engagements against ISIS targets near Abu Kamal. The strikes engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed six ISIS supply routes, an ISIS command-and-control center and an ISIS logistics hub.

On Aug. 31, coalition military forces conducted 11 strikes consisting of 11 engagements against ISIS targets near Abu Kamal. The strikes engaged three ISIS tactical units and destroyed two ISIS vehicles, seven ISIS supply routes, an ISIS mortar system and an ISIS heavy machine gun.

On Aug. 30, coalition military forces conducted two strikes consisting of two engagements against ISIS targets near Abu Kamal. The strikes engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed 31 ISIS vehicles.

There were no reported strikes conducted in Syria on Aug. 29.

On Aug. 28, coalition military forces conducted three strikes consisting of three engagements against ISIS targets near Abu Kamal. The strikes engaged two ISIS tactical units and destroyed an ISIS supply route.

On Aug. 27, coalition military forces conducted two strikes consisting of two engagements against ISIS targets near Abu Kamal. The strikes destroyed three ISIS supply routes.

Strikes in Iraq

On Sept. 2, coalition military forces conducted two strikes consisting of four engagements against ISIS targets:

— Near Beiji, a strike destroyed four ISIS caves.

— Near Qayyarah, a strike destroyed an ISIS-held building.

On Sept. 1, coalition military forces conducted a strike consisting of one engagement against ISIS targets near Makhmur.

There were no reported strikes conducted in Iraq on Aug. 31.

On Aug. 30, coalition military forces conducted a strike consisting of one engagement against ISIS targets near Rutbah. The strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed an ISIS vehicle.

There were no reported strikes conducted in Iraq Aug. 27-29.

Additional Strikes

The following strikes in Iraq and Syria were not reported in the previous release:

On Aug. 26 in Iraq, coalition military forces conducted two strikes consisting of two engagements against ISIS targets near Makhmur. The strikes destroyed five ISIS caves and an ISIS-held building.

On Aug. 25 in Syria, coalition military forces conducted a strike consisting of one engagement against ISIS targets near Abu Kamal. The strike destroyed an ISIS supply route.

On Aug. 22 in Iraq, coalition military forces conducted a strike consisting of five engagements against ISIS targets near Tuz. The strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed three ISIS vehicles.

Part of Operation Inherent Resolve

These strikes were conducted as part of Operation Inherent Resolve, the operation to destroy ISIS in Iraq and Syria. The destruction of ISIS targets in Iraq and Syria also further limits the group’s ability to project terror and conduct external operations throughout the region and the rest of the world, task force officials said.

The list above contains all strikes conducted by fighter, attack, bomber, rotary-wing or remotely piloted aircraft; rocket-propelled artillery; and ground-based tactical artillery, officials noted.

A strike, as defined by the coalition, refers to one or more kinetic engagements that occur in roughly the same geographic location to produce a single or cumulative effect.

For example, task force officials explained, a single aircraft delivering a single weapon against a lone ISIS vehicle is one strike, but so is multiple aircraft delivering dozens of weapons against a group of ISIS-held buildings and weapon systems in a compound, having the cumulative effect of making that facility harder or impossible to use. Strike assessments are based on initial reports and may be refined, officials said.

The task force does not report the number or type of aircraft employed in a strike, the number of munitions dropped in each strike, or the number of individual munition impact points against a target.

(Source: US Dept of Defense)

Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve and its partners continue to pursue the lasting defeat of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria in designated parts of Syria and Iraq, Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve officials reported today.

Operation Roundup, which began May 1 to accelerate the defeat of ISIS in the Middle Euphrates River Valley and Iraq-Syria border region, has continued to gain ground and remove terrorists from the battlefield through offensive operations coupled with precision coalition strike support.

Between Aug. 20-26, coalition military forces conducted 18 strikes, consisting of 26 engagements, in Iraq and Syria

Strikes in Syria

There were no reported strikes conducted Syria yesterday.

On Aug. 25, coalition military forces conducted three strikes consisting of three engagements against ISIS targets near Abu Kamal. The strikes engaged an ISIS tactical unit, and destroyed an ISIS supply route, an ISIS-held building and an ISIS vehicle.

On Aug. 24, coalition military forces conducted a strike consisting of one engagement against ISIS targets near Abu Kamal. The strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed an ISIS vehicle.

On Aug. 23, coalition military forces conducted a strike consisting of one engagement against ISIS targets near Abu Kamal.

On Aug. 22, coalition military forces conducted three strikes consisting of three engagements against ISIS targets near Abu Kamal. The strikes destroyed three ISIS supply routes.

On Aug. 21, coalition military forces conducted four strikes consisting of four engagements against ISIS targets near Abu Kamal. The strikes destroyed three ISIS supply routes and an ISIS headquarters.

There were no reported strikes conducted in Syria on Aug. 20.

Strikes in Iraq

Yesterday in Iraq, coalition military forces conducted a strike consisting of two engagements against ISIS targets near Mahkmur. The strike destroyed an ISIS-held building.

There were no reported strikes conducted in Iraq on Aug. 25.

On Aug. 24, coalition military forces conducted two strikes consisting of five engagements against ISIS targets:

  • Near Rutbah, a strike destroyed two ISIS-held buildings.
  • Near Mosul, a strike destroyed seven ISIS-held buildings.

There were no reported strikes conducted in Iraq on Aug. 23.

On Aug. 22, coalition military forces conducted a strike consisting of five engagements against ISIS targets near Wadi Ashai. The strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed an ISIS-held building and three ISIS vehicles.

There were no reported strikes conducted in Iraq on Aug. 21.

On Aug. 20, coalition military forces conducted two strikes consisting of two engagements against ISIS targets:

  • Near Rawah, a strike destroyed an ISIS supply route.
  • Near Jazeera Desert, a strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed three ISIS logistics hubs and an ISIS vehicle.

Additional Strikes

Coalition military forces conducted two strikes in Syria that were not reported in the previous release:

On Aug. 19, coalition military forces conducted a strike consisting of one engagement against ISIS targets near Abu Kamal. The strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed an ISIS vehicle.

On Aug. 18, coalition military forces conducted a strike consisting of one engagement against ISIS targets near Abu Kamal. The strike destroyed an ISIS supply route.

Part of Operation Inherent Resolve

These strikes were conducted as part of Operation Inherent Resolve, the operation to destroy ISIS in Iraq and Syria. The destruction of ISIS targets in Iraq and Syria also further limits the group’s ability to project terror and conduct external operations throughout the region and the rest of the world, task force officials said.

The list above contains all strikes conducted by fighter, attack, bomber, rotary-wing or remotely piloted aircraft; rocket-propelled artillery; and ground-based tactical artillery, officials noted.

A strike, as defined by the coalition, refers to one or more kinetic engagements that occur in roughly the same geographic location to produce a single or cumulative effect.

For example, task force officials explained, a single aircraft delivering a single weapon against a lone ISIS vehicle is one strike, but so is multiple aircraft delivering dozens of weapons against a group of ISIS-held buildings and weapon systems in a compound, having the cumulative effect of making that facility harder or impossible to use. Strike assessments are based on initial reports and may be refined, officials said.

The task force does not report the number or type of aircraft employed in a strike, the number of munitions dropped in each strike, or the number of individual munition impact points against a target.

(Source: US Dept of Defense)

Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve and its partners continue to pursue the lasting defeat of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria in designated parts of Syria and Iraq, task force officials reported on Monday.

Operation Roundup, which began May 1 to accelerate the defeat of ISIS in the Middle Euphrates River Valley and Iraq-Syria border region, has continued to gain ground and remove terrorists from the battlefield through offensive operations coupled with precision coalition strike support, officials said.

Between Aug. 13-19, coalition military forces conducted 15 strikes, consisting of 25 engagements, in Iraq and Syria.

Strikes in Syria

There were no reported strikes conducted in Syria yesterday.

On Aug. 18 near Abu Kamal, coalition military forces conducted a strike, destroying two ISIS supply routes.

On Aug. 17 near Abu Kamal, coalition military forces conducted a strike, destroying an ISIS logistics hub.

On Aug. 16 near Abu Kamal, coalition military forces conducted a strike, destroying an ISIS vehicle.

On Aug. 15 near Abu Kamal, coalition military forces conducted two strikes, destroying two ISIS supply routes.

On Aug. 14 near Abu Kamal, coalition military forces conducted three strikes, destroying two ISIS command-and-control centers, an ISIS command-and-control support facility and an ISIS supply route.

On Aug. 13 near Abu Kamal, coalition military forces conducted three strikes consisting of three engagements against ISIS targets, destroying an ISIS vehicle and two ISIS lines of communication.

Strikes in Iraq

There were no reported strikes conducted in Iraq yesterday.

On Aug. 18 near Rutbah, coalition military forces conducted two strikes consisting of seven engagements against ISIS targets.

— Near Rutbah, a strike destroyed an ISIS vehicle.

— Near Samarra, a strike destroyed two ISIS-held buildings and an ISIS supply cache.

On Aug. 17 near the Hamrin Mountains, coalition military forces conducted a strike consisting of six engagements against ISIS targets, destroying an ISIS-held building and an ISIS vehicle.

There were no reported strikes conducted in Iraq Aug. 14-16.

On Aug. 13 near the Atshana Mountains, coalition military forces conducted a strike consisting of one engagement against ISIS targets.

Additional Strikes

On Aug. 12, coalition military forces conducted three strikes consisting of four engagements in Iraq and Syria that were not reported in the previous release:

— In Syria near Abu Kamal, coalition military forces conducted a strike, destroying two ISIS lines of communication.

— In Iraq near the Hamrin Mountains, coalition military forces conducted a strike, destroying an ISIS supply route.

— In Iraq near Tuz, coalition military forces conducted a strike, destroying five ISIS-held buildings.

Part of Operation Inherent Resolve

These strikes were conducted as part of Operation Inherent Resolve, the operation to destroy ISIS in Iraq and Syria. The destruction of ISIS targets in Iraq and Syria also further limits the group’s ability to project terror and conduct external operations throughout the region and the rest of the world, task force officials said.

The list above contains all strikes conducted by fighter, attack, bomber, rotary-wing or remotely piloted aircraft; rocket-propelled artillery; and ground-based tactical artillery, officials noted.

A strike, as defined by the coalition, refers to one or more kinetic engagements that occur in roughly the same geographic location to produce a single or cumulative effect.

For example, task force officials explained, a single aircraft delivering a single weapon against a lone ISIS vehicle is one strike, but so is multiple aircraft delivering dozens of weapons against a group of ISIS-held buildings and weapon systems in a compound, having the cumulative effect of making that facility harder or impossible to use. Strike assessments are based on initial reports and may be refined, officials said.

The task force does not report the number or type of aircraft employed in a strike, the number of munitions dropped in each strike, or the number of individual munition impact points against a target.

(Source: US Dept of Defense)

Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve and its partners have continued to attack Islamic State of Iraq and Syria targets in designated parts of Syria and Iraq, Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve officials reported today.

Between June 25-July 1, coalition military forces conducted 29 strikes, consisting of 39 engagements, in Iraq and Syria

Strikes in Syria

There were no reported strikes in Syria yesterday.

On June 30, coalition military forces conducted two strikes consisting of four engagements against ISIS targets.

  • Near Abu Kamal, a strike destroyed an ISIS vehicle.
  • Near Shadaddi, a strike destroyed an ISIS vehicle-borne bomb.

On June 29, coalition military forces conducted three strikes consisting of three engagements against ISIS targets.

  • Near Abu Kamal, two strikes engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed an ISIS vehicle.
  • Near Shadaddi, a strike destroyed four ISIS improvised explosive devices.

On June 28, coalition military forces conducted a strike consisting of one engagement against ISIS targets near Abu Kamal. The strike destroyed two ISIS IED belts.

On June 27, coalition military forces conducted six strikes consisting of six engagements against ISIS targets.

  • Near Abu Kamal, five strikes engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed two ISIS vehicles and two ISIS supply routes.
  • Near Shadaddi, one strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed two ISIS vehicles, an ISIS logistics hub and an ISIS-held building.

On June 26, coalition military forces conducted eight strikes consisting of eight engagements against ISIS targets.

  • Near Abu Kamal, five strikes engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed two ISIS supply routes, an ISIS-held building and two ISIS vehicles.
  • Near Shadaddi, three strikes engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed three ISIS vehicles and an ISIS logistics hub.

There were no reported strikes conducted in Syria on June 25.

Strikes in Iraq

On July 1, coalition military forces conducted a strike consisting of three engagements against ISIS targets near Asad. The strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed three ISIS caves.

On June 30, coalition military forces conducted three strikes consisting of three engagements against ISIS targets.

  • Near Makhmur, a strike engaged one ISIS tactical unit and destroyed an ISIS-held building.
  • Near Qaim, two strikes destroyed two ISIS supply routes.

There were no reported strikes conducted in Iraq on June 28-29.

On June 27, coalition military forces conducted three strikes consisting of three engagements against ISIS targets.

  • Near Rutbah, two strikes engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed two ISIS vehicles.
  • Near Jalawla, a strike destroyed an ISIS-held building and three ISIS caves.

On June 26 in Iraq, coalition military forces conducted two strikes consisting of eight engagements against ISIS targets.

  • Near Asad, a strike destroyed 15 ISIS caves.
  • Near Hawijah, a strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed an ISIS-held building.

There were no reported strikes conducted in Iraq on June 25.

Part of Operation Inherent Resolve

These strikes were conducted as part of Operation Inherent Resolve, the operation to destroy ISIS in Iraq and Syria. The destruction of ISIS targets in Iraq and Syria also further limits the group’s ability to project terror and conduct external operations throughout the region and the rest of the world, task force officials said.

The list above contains all strikes conducted by fighter, attack, bomber, rotary-wing or remotely piloted aircraft; rocket-propelled artillery; and ground-based tactical artillery, officials noted.

A strike, as defined by the coalition, refers to one or more kinetic engagements that occur in roughly the same geographic location to produce a single or cumulative effect.

For example, task force officials explained, a single aircraft delivering a single weapon against a lone ISIS vehicle is one strike, but so is multiple aircraft delivering dozens of weapons against a group of ISIS-held buildings and weapon systems in a compound, having the cumulative effect of making that facility harder or impossible to use. Strike assessments are based on initial reports and may be refined, officials said.

The task force does not report the number or type of aircraft employed in a strike, the number of munitions dropped in each strike, or the number of individual munition impact points against a target.

(Source: US Dept of Defense)

Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve and its partners have increased offensive activity against Islamic State of Iraq and Syria targets in designated parts of Iraq and Syria throughout the months of May and June.

Since the May 1 start of Operation Roundup, Syrian Democratic Forces resumed major offensive operations in the Middle Euphrates River Valley. Since then, the SDF has continued to gain ground through offensive operations coupled with precision coalition strike support.

Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve and its partner forces continue to exert pressure on ISIS senior leaders and associates in order to degrade, disrupt and dismantle ISIS structures and remove terrorists throughout Iraq and Syria. ISIS morale is sinking on the frontlines as privileged ISIS leaders increasingly abandon their own fighters on the battlefield, taking resources with them as they flee.

Over the coming weeks, Operation Roundup will continue to build momentum against ISIS remnants remaining in the Iraq-Syria border region and the middle Euphrates River Valley. The coalition remains committed to the lasting defeat of ISIS here, increasing peace and stability in the region and protecting all our homelands from the ISIS threat.

Coalition military forces conducted 26 strikes June 11-17, consisting of 36 engagements in Iraq and Syria.

Strikes in Syria

On June 17 near Shadaddi, coalition military forces conducted a strike consisting of two engagements against ISIS targets, destroying two ISIS fighting positions.

On June 16 near Abu Kamal, coalition military forces conducted three strikes consisting of three engagements against ISIS targets, destroying two ISIS supply routes.

On June 15, coalition military forces conducted three strikes consisting of three engagements against ISIS targets. Near Abu Kamal, a strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed an ISIS vehicle. Near Shadaddi, two strikes engaged an ISIS tactical unit, destroying an ISIS vehicle and an ISIS anti-air artillery system.

On June 14, coalition military forces conducted two strikes consisting of two engagements against ISIS targets. Near Abu Kamal, a strike destroyed an ISIS-held building. Near Shadaddi, a strike destroyed an ISIS logistics hub and an ISIS fighting position.

On June 13, coalition military forces conducted seven strikes consisting of seven engagements against ISIS targets. Near Abu Kamal, four strikes destroyed two ISIS vehicles, an ISIS supply route and damaged an ISIS vehicle. Near Shadaddi, three strikes engaged an ISIS tactical unit, destroying an ISIS tactical vehicle, an ISIS line of communication and an ISIS headquarters.

On June 12, coalition military forces conducted four strikes consisting of 10 engagements against ISIS targets. Near Abu Kamal, a strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit. Near Shadaddi, three strikes engaged an ISIS tactical unit, destroying two ISIS fighting positions and three ISIS lines of communication.

On June 11 near Abu Kamal, coalition military forces conducted three strikes consisting of three engagements against ISIS targets, destroying three ISIS supply routes.

Strikes in Iraq

There were no reported strikes conducted in Iraq on June 15-17.

On June 14, coalition military forces conducted two strikes consisting of four engagements against ISIS targets. Near Basheer, a strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed seven ISIS-held buildings. Near Rutbah, a strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit.

There were no reported strikes conducted in Iraq on June 13.

On June 12 near Basheer, coalition military forces conducted a strike consisting of two engagements against ISIS targets, destroying two ISIS tunnels and an ISIS supply cache.

There were no reported strikes conducted in Iraq on June 11.

Definition of Strikes

This coalition strike release contains all strikes conducted by fighter, attack, bomber, rotary-wing or remotely piloted aircraft, rocket-propelled artillery and ground-based tactical artillery.

A strike, as defined by coalition officials, refers to one or more kinetic engagements that occur in roughly the same geographic location to produce a single, sometimes cumulative effect in that location. For example, a single aircraft delivering a single weapon against a lone ISIS vehicle is one strike, but so is multiple aircraft delivering dozens of weapons against a group of ISIS-held buildings and weapon systems in a compound, having the cumulative effect of making that facility harder or impossible to use. Strike assessments are based on initial reports and may be refined.

Task force officials do not report the number or type of aircraft employed in a strike, the number of munitions dropped in each strike, or the number of individual munition impact points against a target.

(Source: US Dept of Defense)