Iraq Britain Business Council and Iraq’s Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research sign Memorandum of Understanding

The Iraq Britain Business Council (IBBC) signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with Iraq’s Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research at the IBBC Cumberland Lodge Retreat on 7 July.

The memorandum was signed by Baroness Nicholson of Winterbourne, President of IBBC and H.E. Dr Abdul Razzaq Al-Issa, Iraqi Minister of Higher Education and Scientific Research. The singing was supported and witnessed by Ambassador Jon Wilks CMG, Her Majesty’s A mbassador to the Republic of Iraq and Dr Nahi Al-Rikabi, the Iraqi Cultural Attaché to London.

The memorandum details the commitment of both parties to work together in a constructive and progressive way to further enhance links between Iraqi and UK institutions of higher education.

The partnership is a further boost to the IBBC’s efforts to support initiatives between UK universities and Iraqi institutions of higher education.

IBBC has three British Universities within the council; Bath Spa University, University of Northampton and University of Leicester, who are all active within Iraq and aiming to increase their activities in the country. Mosul University has also recently joined the Council as IBBC continue to expand its Education & Heritage Sector Table.

(Source: IBBC)

From AFP. Any opinions expressed are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

A group of Mosul residents celebrates, as the Iraqi city marks one year since pro-government forces recaptured it from the Islamic State group.

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One year after the events of Mosul ended in July 2017, the Iraqi Red Crescent teams continue to provide humanitarian assistance to the residents inside the city or to the displaced who face some challenges to return to their homes after their homes have been damaged.

After thousands of houses were destroyed, roads and bridges were damaged, and water station, as well as sanitation facilities, were destroyed by heavy fighting, the Iraqi Red Crescent Society (IRCS) in cooperation with its partners in the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement installs water purification stations and installs (65) water tanks with a capacity of 5000 liters distributed in the old neighborhoods of Mosul.

Relief official for the Iraqi Red Crescent Society, Haidar Kassem, says:

“The IRCS teams distribute more than (350,000) liters of water per day covering Mosul’s old city and this is done by transporting water from the water station in the Ghazalani area by IRCS water truck and then all tanks which were distributed in the old city neighborhoods will be filled”.

The IRCS teams continue to provide the needs of the families in their residential areas and the displaced in the camps such as the distribution of food parcels for families in their residential areas as well as provide hot food meals for the families in the displacement camps not to mention provide some special needs of children and women.

“IRCS Health teams continue to receive and treat more 130 cases per day and specialist medical staff give medicine to the patient in the Health center and mobile clinic of the IRCS.

(Source: IRCS)

Reconstruction and recovery in Iraq: Reviving the Spirit of Mosul

The ‘Revive the Spirit of Mosul’ Initiative was presented on 30 June 2018 during the 42nd session of the World Heritage Committee.

Launched by UNESCO Director-General Audrey Azoulay in February 2018, the Mosul Initiative is conceived in partnership with the Iraqi Government to integrate the human dimension in the reconstruction and recovery of the city, particularly through culture and education, after years of painful destruction. Between 2014 and 2017, historic monuments and sites were systematically destroyed in Iraq.

Ernesto Ottone-Ramirez, UNESCO Assistant Director-General for Culture, pointed out that the international community has the responsibility to support the Iraqi people in the reconstruction and recovery of Iraq, and that the first signs are already positive.

“Last April in Baghdad, UNESCO and the United Arab Emirates signed a historic partnership for the reconstruction of Mosul, which includes rebuilding the iconic Great Mosque of Al Nuri and its leaning Al-Hadba minaret. This pioneering partnership is a message of hope that Iraq’s future will be shaped with its young women and men as agents of reconstruction and change in a prosperous, inclusive, reconciled and open society.” The United Arab Emirates have committed USD 50.4 million to rebuild and restore the Al Nuri Mosque over a five-year period.

H.E Fryad Rawandouzi, Minister of Culture, Tourism and Antiquities of Iraq, expressed his gratitude to the countries standing alongside Iraq to protect its culture. “Iraq, which has stood up in the face of terrorism and triumphed, is fully aware of the power of culture to bring back hope and peace, and restore the archaeological sites, museums, buildings and intangible heritage that terrorism has destroyed. Culture contributes to peaceful coexistence.”

He also took the occasion to hand to Mr Ottone-Ramirez the submission of Mosul to be included on the Tentative List of sites of Iraq, for potential future inscription on the World Heritage List.

H.E Ruba Al Hassan, Undersecretary of the Ministry of Culture and Knowledge Development, United Arab Emirates, said, “We have a collective responsibility, not only in the Arab region, but in the wider international community towards Iraq and other nations that have endured conflict to work towards protecting our shared heritage, not only as Muslims or as Arabs but as human beings who value the wealth and weight that heritage and culture brings to enriching our common humanity.”

Mosul is a living symbol of the multifaceted identity of Iraq, and one of the oldest cities in the world; it is at the crossroads of the Middle East and bears witness to the wealth of civilizations that crossed the region over centuries. The archaeological site of Nimrud, the Museum of Mosul, the Nabi Younes Shrine and many other sites there have been targeted for intentional destruction.

The ‘Revive the Spirit of Mosul’ initiative is a UNESCO priority and one of its most ambitious reconstruction and recovery campaigns.

A conference organized in conjunction with the Iraqi Government will take place at UNESCO Headquarters in Paris on 10 September 2018, to mobilize the support of the international community.

(Source: UNESCO)

A total of 76 Iraqi civilians were killed and another 129 injured in acts of terrorism, violence and armed conflict in Iraq in June 2018*, according to casualty figures recorded by the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI).

The figures include ordinary citizens and others considered civilian at the time of death or injury, such as police in non-combat functions, civil defence, personal security teams, facilities protection police and fire department personnel.

Of the overall figures recorded by UNAMI for the month of June, the number of civilians killed (not including police) was 68, while the number of injured (not including police) was 118.

Diyala was the worst affected Governorate, with 52 civilian casualties (16 killed, 36 injured), followed by Kirkuk (10 killed, 36 injured) and Baghdad (19 killed and 18 injured).

According to information obtained by UNAMI from the Health Directorate in Anbar, the Governorate suffered a total of 7 civilian casualties (none killed, 7 injured). Figures are updated until 30 June 2018, inclusive.

*CAVEAT: UNAMI has been hindered in effectively verifying casualties in certain areas; in some cases, UNAMI could only partially verify certain incidents. Figures for casualties from Anbar Governorate are provided by the Health Directorate and might not fully reflect the number of casualties due to the increased volatility of the situation on the ground in Anbar and the disruption of services. For these reasons, the figures reported have to be considered as the absolute minimum.

(Source: United Nations)

From AFP. Any opinions expressed are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

UNHCR Special Envoy Angelina Jolie visits West Mosul, less than a year after the city’s liberation.

The visit marks Jolie’s 61st mission – and her fifth visit to Iraq – with the UN Refugee Agency since 2001.

She arrives in the city on the second day of the Eid al-Fitr, the Muslim holiday marking the end of Ramadan.

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From Al Jazeera. Any opinions expressed are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Entire cities, including western Mosul and Ramadi, have been destroyed in the war against the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL, also known as ISIS) group in Iraq.

The Iraqi government says large-scale reconstruction across the country hasn’t started yet because it doesn’t have the money.

About $90 billion is needed to rebuild the country after 15 years of war since the fall of Saddam Hussein in 2003, but Iraq’s allies pledged only $30bn At a donor conference in February.

Al Jazeera‘s Charles Stratford reports from Iraq’s capital Baghdad:

A total of 95 Iraqi civilians were killed and another 163 injured in acts of terrorism, violence and armed conflict in Iraq in May 2018*, according to casualty figures recorded by the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI).

The figures include ordinary citizens and others considered civilian at the time of death or injury, such as police in non-combat functions, civil defence, personal security teams, facilities protection police and fire department personnel.

Of the overall figures recorded by UNAMI for the month of May, the number of civilians killed (not including police) was 86, while the number of injured (not including police) was 148.

Baghdad was the worst affected Governorate, with 117 civilian casualties (45 killed, 72 injured), followed by Diyala with 9 killed and 35 injured, and Kirkuk with 20 killed and 16 injured.

According to information obtained by UNAMI from the Health Directorate in Anbar, the Governorate suffered a total of 21 civilian casualties (6 killed and 15 injured). Figures are updated until 31 May, inclusive.

*CAVEATS: The figures reported have to be considered as the absolute minimum. UNAMI has been hindered in effectively verifying casualties in certain areas due to volatility of the situation on the ground and the disruption of services. In some cases, UNAMI could only partially verify certain incidents. Figures for casualties from Anbar Governorate were provided by the Health Directorate and might not fully reflect the real number of casualties in the Governorate.

(Source: United Nations)

A total of 95 Iraqi civilians were killed and another 163 injured in acts of terrorism, violence and armed conflict in Iraq in May 2018*, according to casualty figures recorded by the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI).

The figures include ordinary citizens and others considered civilian at the time of death or injury, such as police in non-combat functions, civil defence, personal security teams, facilities protection police and fire department personnel.

Of the overall figures recorded by UNAMI for the month of May, the number of civilians killed (not including police) was 86, while the number of injured (not including police) was 148.

Baghdad was the worst affected Governorate, with 117 civilian casualties (45 killed, 72 injured), followed by Diyala with 9 killed and 35 injured, and Kirkuk with 20 killed and 16 injured.

According to information obtained by UNAMI from the Health Directorate in Anbar, the Governorate suffered a total of 21 civilian casualties (6 killed and 15 injured). Figures are updated until 31 May, inclusive.

*CAVEATS: The figures reported have to be considered as the absolute minimum. UNAMI has been hindered in effectively verifying casualties in certain areas due to volatility of the situation on the ground and the disruption of services. In some cases, UNAMI could only partially verify certain incidents. Figures for casualties from Anbar Governorate were provided by the Health Directorate and might not fully reflect the real number of casualties in the Governorate.

(Source: United Nations)