Iraq’s National Investment Commission (NIC) in coordination with the Ministry of Migration and Dislocated are pleased to announce the investment opportunity of the construction of new housing compounds on the land lots which areas and ownership are shown in the table below:

No. Province Area Ownership of land Type Type of Investment
1 Diwanyah 20 Donum Ministry of Migration and Dislocated Araba Housing compound
2 Kut 11 Donum and 15 Olk Ministry of Migration and Dislocated Araba Housing compound

For any further information please visit the Ministry of Migration and Dislocated located in Karat Miriam district in Baghdad or apply the request to the NIC through the email address : pfoc@investpromo.gov.iq

(Source: NIC)

By John Lee.

The Ministry of Oil has extended the closing date for tenders for the new 100,000-bpd refinery in Kut.

Companies interested in investing must submit their documents by the end of working hours on Tuesday, 4th October 2018.

More information here.

For further information please contact studies@oil.gov.iq or studies.oil@gmail.com.

(Source: Iraqi Ministry of Oil)

By John Lee.

Iraq’s Ministry of Oil has invited international companies to bid for three new oil refineries, to be build on BOOT or BOO bases:

  1. Kut, in Wasit governorate, with a capacity of 100,000 bpd;
  2. Hadeetha, in Anbar governorate, with a capacity of 70,000 bpd;
  3. Diwaniya governorate, with a capacity of 70,000 bpd.

(Source: Ministry of Oil)

By John Lee.

The Ministry of Oil has extended the closing date for supplying information packs relating to the tenders for the new refineries in Kut and Samawa.

The packs will be available until the close of business on 16th March 2017 (instead of Tuesday the 28th February), while the last date for receipt of documents from interested companies is extended to the end of the working hours of Sunday 30th April.

(Source: Iraqi Ministry of Oil)

By Ammar Alsawad for Al Monitor. Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News. 

On Feb. 28, hundreds of pro-Sadrist university students in Kut attacked Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi’s procession with stones and water bottles. Abadi’s security forces fired tear gas and live bullets at the protesters, injuring three.

Subsequently, Sadrist leader Muqtada al-Sadr (pictured) apologized to Abadi for the breaches. Though he called on his followers to stop the protests in Kut until further notice, he accused former Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki of being behind the breaches to try to distort the Sadrist movement’s image.

The incident reflects the intense competition among Iraq’s Shiite leaders. There are currently three main Shiite figures competing for power: head of the Islamic Supreme Council Ammar al-Hakim, head of the State of Law Coalition Maliki, and Sadr himself. Each has his own plan to remain in power and remove the others or limit their influence.

On Feb. 20, Sadr announced a 29-point initiativeInitial Solutions — his vision for the future of Iraq once the Islamic State (IS) is forced out. Holding local primary elections was among the points. Sadr’s keenness on holding elections is likely to further deepen the Shiite split as the leaders fight for a majority position.

About a month ago, the Sadrist movement started calling for electoral reforms, seeking to reduce Maliki’s strong chances of winning the election as long as no radical changes are made to the electoral law and commission.

This article was originally published by Niqash. Any opinions expressed are those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Sajad Saadi has dreams of becoming the next Mark Zuckerberg, the now-seriously wealthy American who helped found Facebook while he was at university.

And to get that particular party started, the 19-year-old from Diwaniyah, has launched his own social media and networking website. It’s called Neproo and, if you look closely, it seems that Saadi’s dream is not as much of a fantasy as one might initially think.

“I planned it very carefully so we would attract the maximum number of users,” says the young man, who has worked on many different digital projects in Iraq.

And, he boasts, he looked carefully at Facebook’s business model so he could avoid any of the pitfalls the now-giant social media site encountered when it first launched.

Neproo, which already has around 100,000 users, also boasts features that Facebook doesn’t have.  “For example, on Facebook you cannot tell how many people have visited your page,” Saadi says.

“There is also a counter on each person’s page that gives the most active users added benefits. They can get free gifts from Neproo, things like advertising and logos for their pages. It strengthens their personal brand,” Saadi explains.

The website allows users to post pictures, videos, music and it has a video chat feature, another thing that Facebook doesn’t offer. Perhaps reflecting the fact that Iraqis use Facebook like a giant emporium to buy and sell all manner of goods and services, Neproo also has a feature called “My Shop” where subscribers can trade or promote their goods.

By John Lee.

Iraq’s new oil minister, Jabbar al-Luaibi, has invited international oil companies to invest in four new oil refineries across the country:

  • Kirkuk: 150,000 bpd;
  • Kut: 100,000 bpd;
  • Samawa: 70,000 bpd; and,
  • Basra: 100-150,000 bpd.

Contracts will be considered on both BOT (Build–Operate–Transfer) and BOO (Build–Own–Operate) bases.

The Minister made the announcement during a visit to the Iraqi Drilling Company (IDC), and said the Ministry will announce other projects in the near future.

According to a report from Platts, the ministry also plans to double Iraq’s crude oil storage capacity to 24 million barrels over the next few years through international investment.

(Sources: Ministry of Oil, Platts)

This article was originally published by Niqash. Any opinions expressed are those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Abu Al Hawa market in Kut has been selling alternative remedies for around two centuries now. But as one historian points out, the place is about more than just self-medication.

The stores in this market, in the centre of the southern Iraqi city of Kut, are tiny. There’s barely room for the owners to sit alongside their wares. But business is thriving here in the city’s “medicine market”, as it has done for almost two centuries now.

There are around 3,000 kinds of natural medicines available here, says Zaher Abu al-Hawa, the eldest son of the al-Hawa family whose ancestor is credited with creating this market around 200 years ago. “Its proof that comfort comes from the earth,” al-Hawa says poetically. “The healing power of the many different kinds of medicines sold here has given alternative medicine credibility.”

Al-Hawa says the market was first started during the Ottoman Empire and the Turkish occupation of Iraq. “It was named the Abu Al Hawa market because it was built by al-Haj Rashid Abu al-Hawa, the eldest son in the family at the time. He became famous for his knowledge of alternative medicines and he healed diseases that medicine at the time could not.”

Al-Hawa’s family, who started out selling herbs and vegetable fat, has grown prosperous thanks to the market, and their sons still work here in Kut today.

This article was originally published by Niqash. Any opinions expressed are those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Abu Al Hawa market in Kut has been selling alternative remedies for around two centuries now. But as one historian points out, the place is about more than just self-medication.

The stores in this market, in the centre of the southern Iraqi city of Kut, are tiny. There’s barely room for the owners to sit alongside their wares. But business is thriving here in the city’s “medicine market”, as it has done for almost two centuries now.

There are around 3,000 kinds of natural medicines available here, says Zaher Abu al-Hawa, the eldest son of the al-Hawa family whose ancestor is credited with creating this market around 200 years ago. “Its proof that comfort comes from the earth,” al-Hawa says poetically. “The healing power of the many different kinds of medicines sold here has given alternative medicine credibility.”

Al-Hawa says the market was first started during the Ottoman Empire and the Turkish occupation of Iraq. “It was named the Abu Al Hawa market because it was built by al-Haj Rashid Abu al-Hawa, the eldest son in the family at the time. He became famous for his knowledge of alternative medicines and he healed diseases that medicine at the time could not.”

Al-Hawa’s family, who started out selling herbs and vegetable fat, has grown prosperous thanks to the market, and their sons still work here in Kut today.

By John Lee.

A Malaysian firm has won a 71-billion Iraqi dinar ($61-million) contract to develop the southern area of Kut in Wasit [Wassit] province, according to a report from Al-Shorfa.

Wasit governor Mahmoud Talal said:

The contract includes developing and rehabilitating the southern neighbourhoods of town by developing and paving streets and implementing water, sanitation and electricity networks.

The contract also includes developing various public service buildings, rehabilitating gardens and hotels in the area, and building market

The project is expected to be completed within three years.

(Source: Al-Shorfa)

(Flag image via Shutterstock)