Persistent Gender Inequality in Iraq Calls for Coordinated Efforts in Developing 2nd National Action Plan on Implementing Resolution 1325

Gender inequality continues to prevail in Iraq with worrisome signals that it is deepening, requiring intensified efforts and coordination in developing a new action plan on implementing UN Security Council resolution 1325, UN Representative to Iraq Ján Kubiš said today at the high-level consultation meeting on the development of the 2nd National Action Plan.

Although he was encouraged to see progress in the protection pillar and dedicated efforts to strengthen the participation pillar in the National Action Plan, the legacy of the conflict with the terrorist Da’esh continues to hamper steps forward and there are other worrying signs of women being targeted.

Mr. Kubiš condemned the recent attacks against women, including the assassination of two women and the sudden death of two others in the past month, all of them active in political and social spheres. Other civil society activists including women are targeted by social media and political threat campaign, among others for their contacts with foreign embassies. This is unacceptable.

“Only once politically and socially active women are protected and safe, Iraq can claim to be making real progress towards women’s equality and empowerment,” he said.

The development of a new NAP with all the diversity and complexity of issues will require continuous coordination and collaboration across sectors, in particular involving civil society, and drawing from the lessons learned from the previous plan, the Special Representative said.

“By making your deliberations open to the society, by publicly broadcasting them you could mobilise even broader support for your objectives,” Mr. Kubiš said.

The Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General for Iraq noted with disappointment that political forces that negotiate the formation of the government do so, again without the participation of women. “

We all need to ask: “when the political leaders intend to deliver on their pledges to empower women and advance their rights as a part of the democratic entitlement of all Iraqis thus strengthening equal representation and inclusiveness? The time is now. Otherwise, all the exclamations about commitment to equality of women and values of democracy continue to sound hollow.”

Mr. Kubiš outlined UN efforts in support of women empowerment, noting that UNAMI supports women parliamentarians in their quest to establish a cross-political women’s parliamentary caucus. UNAMI will continue to impress on Political Parties who are key to advancing the participation of women in all processes to include women in their leadership structures, urging men advocates to assume a more prominent role, and parliamentarians to consider gender responsive budget in the next budget law to enhance the implementation of the NAP.

The UN will also continue to advocate for the establishment of a dedicated institution in the next government structure with budget and authority to coordinate the implementation of the NAP and national frameworks and policies on WPS.

The UN in Iraq will also mobilise support of the broader international community, including through the International Gender Group from among embassies here in Baghdad, Mr. Kubiš concluded.

(Source: UN)

Iraqi military and security forces have disappeared dozens of mostly Sunni Arab males since 2014, including children as young as 9, often in the context of counterterrorism operations, Human Rights Watch said in a report released today.

The 78-page report, “‘Life Without a Father is Meaningless’: Arbitrary Arrests and Enforced Disappearances in Iraq 2014-2017,” draws on research Human Rights Watch has published on enforced disappearances in Iraq since 2014, when Iraqi forces launched anti-ISIS operations, and documents an additional 74 cases of men and four cases of boys detained by Iraqi military and security forces between April 2014 and October 2017 and forcibly disappeared.

The enforced disappearances documented are part of a much wider continuing pattern in Iraq. Iraqi officials have failed to respond to inquiries from the families and Human Rights Watch for information about the disappeared.

“Families across Iraq whose fathers, husbands, and sons disappeared after Iraqi forces detained them are desperate to find their loved ones,” said Lama Fakih, deputy Middle East director at Human Rights Watch. “Despite years of searching, and requests to Iraqi authorities, the government has provided no answers about where they are or if they are even still alive.”

More here.

(Source: HRW)

Survivors of Gender-Based Violence (GBV) in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq (KRI) can now dial “119” to receive support, counselling, and referrals to community-based services and resources in the region.

On 26 September, UNFPA and the General Directorate for Combatting Violence Against Women (GDCVAW) in KRI launched the first helpline for gender-based violence survivors.

The Helpline is a 24-hour call centre established to provide confidential support and guidance to survivors of GBV. Callers will be connected with trained social workers as well as legal and psycho-social support counsellors, both female and male.

UNFPA also organised two trainings for GDCVAW social workers and phone operators on the helpline procedures and guidelines for answering, probing, supporting, and following up on calls received at the call centre.

“The Helpline initiative will enable GDCVAW trained operators to provide counselling, advice, and support to GBV survivors and vulnerable individuals in the Kurdistan region of Iraq”, said Mr Kareem Sinjari, Minister of Interior in KRI.

Mr Ramanathan Balakrishnan, UNFPA Representative to Iraq, emphasized the importance of this project:

“While remedial services require strengthening to ensure the best possible care for GBV survivors, the helpline is definitely a positive step forward in that direction. We are confident that the helpline 119 is a solid tool that will help the Government in its efforts to combat gender-based violence and support survivors.”

The project, supported by the Regional Development and Protection Programme (RDPP), is expected to reach more than 3,600 survivors in the first year of its operations.

(Source: UN)

By Saad Salloum for Al Monitor. Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

A number of Iraqi Jews are organizing to officially demand the restoration of their Iraqi citizenship and the annulment of Article 17/II of Iraqi Nationality Law no. 26 (2006), which expressly excludes Jews from pursuing the option. The law provides that Iraqi nationality be restored to those who lost it as a result of political, racial or sectarian decisions.

Edwin Shukar, vice president of the European Jewish Congress, called for the restoration of Iraqi citizenship for Jews in a speech delivered Aug. 15 at the First International Conference on the Yezidi Genocide in Erbil, the capital of Iraqi Kurdistan.

The first Mizrahi Jew to assume the vice presidency of the Board of Deputies of British Jews, Shukar wants to acquire Iraqi citizenship in part because he feels he needs it to better represent the community of Iraqi Jews, in the diaspora and in Iraq, where it lacks formal representation before the government.

Shukar, born in Baghdad in 1955, fled the Baath regime with his family in 1971. His mother tongue is Arabic, but he is equally fluent in Hebrew and English. Shukar told Al-Monitor that his ties to Iraq remain deeply rooted.

Click here to read the full story.

Two former detainees and the father of a man who died in detention have provided details of ill-treatment, torture, and death in facilities run by the Iraqi Interior Ministry in the Mosul area, Human Rights Watch said on Sunday.

A detainee held by the ministry’s Intelligence and Counter Terrorism Office in an east Mosul prison from January to May 2018 said he witnessed and experienced repeated torture during interrogations, and saw nine men die there, at least two from the abuse.

Another man from Mosul, arrested in March by local police, died during police interrogation in the Mosul police station, his father said. And a man who was held in the Intelligence and Counter Terrorism prison in Qayyarah said he saw other men returning from interrogations with signs of abuse on their bodies.

More here.

(Source: HRW)

From Al Jazeera. Any opinions expressed are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

The Iraqi National Security Service has admitted to holding hundreds of people suspected of terrorism for months.

According to Human Rights Watch, the agency has been keeping them at a facility east of Mosul – which was retaken from the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL, also known as ISIS) group just over a year ago.

Human rights groups say abuses of detainees are commonplace in the country.

Al Jazeera‘s Imran Khan has more from Baghdad:

By Human Rights Watch (HRW).

Iraq’s National Security Service (NSS), an Iraqi intelligence agency reporting to Iraq’s prime minister, has acknowledged for the first time that it is detaining individuals for prolonged periods of time, despite not having a clear mandate to do so, Human Rights Watch said on Sunday.

NSS is holding more than 400 detainees in a detention facility in east Mosul. As of July 4, 2018, 427 men were there, some of whom had been held for more than seven months.

One person held there briefly in April described horrendous conditions, and said that detainees had no access to lawyers, family visits, or medical care. He described one prisoner dying in April after being tortured for months. Human Rights Watch was granted access to the facility on July 4. The detention conditions appeared improved but remained overcrowded.

“National Security Service officials in Baghdad told us that the intelligence agency has no authority to hold prisoners, but changed their line once we were able to see the prisoners for ourselves,” said Lama Fakih, deputy Middle East director at Human Rights Watch. “Baghdad needs to publicly clarify which authorities have the right to hold and interrogate detainees.”

On April 17 a senior NSS official in Baghdad denied operating any detention facilities and claimed that the agency only holds small numbers of people for up to 48 hours before transferring them to places of formal detention. But researchers were granted access to the facility, where officials said 427 prisoners were being held at the time.

A subsequent written response from the Baghdad office confirmed the NSS is holding prisoners in one facility in Mosul, but then proceeded to speak about detention facilities in the plural form.

Given the serious contradiction in statements and facts on the ground, the NSS should clarify the number of prisoners it is detaining and the number and location of facilities it is using to detain them. Iraqi authorities should declare the number of detention facilities across Iraq. Judicial authorities should investigate the allegations presented in this report.

More here.

By John Lee.

An Iraqi government block on internet access is reportedly costing the country $40 million per day in lost business, sales and opportunities.

The estimate is from the COST tool, based on the Brookings Institution economic impact methodology for internet shutdowns, using data collected by the NetBlocks internet shutdown observatory in collaboration with volunteers across Iraq.

Internet restrictions that have been implemented in an attempt to suppress the recent protests across the country.

According to Amnesty International, the internet was cut to stop protesters posting images of security force attacks.

(Source: NetBlocks)

This article was originally published by Niqash. Any opinions expressed are those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

By Ahmad Waheed.

Women In Conservative Basra Seek – And Find – More Freedoms

An influx of investors, immigration, better security and more shopping malls is emboldening females in the southern city of Basra.

Shahid and Nour al-Rubaie sit on the third floor of one of the largest shopping malls in Basra, waiting for their lunch. The two women might look innocuous to some  but for many locals, they are still an interesting sight: Two women, on their own, without a male guardian, out shopping and eating in what is still a fairly conservative southern Iraqi city.

“Today Basra is a very safe place,” Shahid told NIQASH. “There are malls like this that we can walk around. We can wear what we want in here because it is closed and safe,” she added, before explaining that in the recent past she used to dress far more conservatively, for fear of provoking the armed militia members who patrolled the city’s streets.

In the 1970s and 1980s, Basra was a relatively cosmopolitan place. In the 1990s, it started to become more traditional and after 2003, and the US-led invasion of Iraq, Basra – one of Iraq’s biggest cities – became increasingly conservative again, partially due to the competing militias that tried to take control of parts of the city, ostensibly to maintain security.

But in recent years that fundamentalist feeling has faded somewhat. Since 2008, the Iraqi government has been disarming the militias and has arrested several of the most prominent leaders.

And as the city has attracted more investment, families who have lived elsewhere have returned to Basra or moved here, and often they have brought less conservative attitudes with them.

The militias who patrolled the cities once put up signs warning local females not wear make-up or go out without a veil on. At local universities, those women who chose not to wear a veil or who wore clothes that strict religious rules said were provocative, were often harassed.

But today there are more unveiled women, more women driving cars in Basra or going shopping without a male family member. There are even primary schools with mixed classes that have been so popular that other investors are founding similar private schools.

 

Basra women in the 1960s.

 

“We have issued many more driving licenses to women in the past three years,” says Riyad al-Eidani, a spokesperson for the provincial traffic department. “This is because women now go to work or drive their children to schools. They are also buying their own cars.”

The number of women drivers has increased so much that male drivers are no longer surprised to see a female in charge of a vehicle, al-Eidani adds. “And we have actually realised that women are more careful drivers. They cause fewer accidents and abide by the law.”

There are even female traffic officers now. Basra’s women have also started doing other jobs, without fear of recrimination.

“Today we have many females who can model for us in Basra,” says local fashion designer,  Ziad al-Athari, “Ten years ago we could never find anyone to model because of tribal and community restrictions. But today we have many candidates for our shows.”

Iraqi women in conservative areas are often criticised as loose if they do anything  – such as modelling, sinigang or acting – that puts them in front of an audience. In Basra, fashion shows could only be staged in well-guarded venues at first but now they’ve become more popular and are often open to the general public.

“As a result of far better security we now see many women in Basra taking up jobs; some even start businesses,” al-Athari explains. “They also benefit from what’s going on in other countries where they can see women working and independent but still respectable.”

The first union of local Iraqi businesswomen was established in Basra in 2011.

Today all of this means everything, and not much at all, to the al-Rubaie sisters in the mall. They’re more interested in relaxing and shopping. After lunch, they set off into the mall, to look at some clothes and trinkets and then afterwards, Shahid drives her sister home.

The United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI) Human Rights Office (HRO) organized a training course in Dohuk for human rights activists and staff members of NGOs working in the field of human rights in Dohuk Governorate.

The training course, entitled “Strengthening Human Rights Monitoring and Documentation Skills,” was part of a series of activities the HRO is running to support civil society organizations and regional institutions for protecting and promoting human rights in the Kurdistan Region.

The training course focused on deepening participants’ understanding on key principles, legal frameworks and core skills including fact-finding missions, interviewing, and report-writing. Sessions were provided by United Nations human rights professionals.

Representatives of 25 NGOs (10 women and 15 men) from Dohuk city and surrounding areas participated in the training.

Mr. Zito Siany, the Human Rights Officer of HRO, stated that the training is part of the HRO program aimed supporting the NGOs in Dohuk and other KR districts to build their staff members’ capacities in monitoring and documenting violations of human rights.

Participant Twana Othman, from the National Center for Human Rights (NCHR), noted that the training assisted him in acquiring knowledge about human rights monitoring principles along with his involvement in prison monitoring and holding interviews with detainees.

Mr. Othman further explained:

“Through this training I have learned the appropriate methods of preparing for and conducting interviews with the victims and have gained substantial knowledge regarding the state’s obligations towards the ratified international human rights treaties, and how to make the best use of United Nations Human Rights Conventional and Unconventional Mechanisms to protect and promote human rights.”

(Source: UN)

(Picture: Human rights, from igorstevanovic/Shutterstock)