The number of cases of COVID-19-infected persons is also rapidly increasing in Iraq. The peak of the disease is expected in autumn. At least four new hospitals are to be built in the country’s largest cities by then.

KfW is financing the construction on behalf of the German government with an initial amount of EUR 15 million. The contract was signed 23 July 2020.

At the end of April lockdown and corona restrictions were lifted in Iraq. Since then the number of cases has risen sharply. A peak in infections is expected in autumn, which will overburden the infrastructure of the health care facilities.

By then, almost 50,000 beds in hospitals, including 12,000 intensive care beds, will be needed for the treatment of COVID-19 patients alone. In Iraq, however, there are only just under 50,000 hospital beds at all, including about 700 intensive care beds.

To support the Iraqi health system KfW is financing the construction of at least four hospitals on behalf of the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) with an initial EUR 15 million. It is being examined whether further hospitals can be financed in a further phase.

A simulation of the course of infection according to a WHO model showed that the conurbations will suffer the highest case numbers. Therefore, four hospitals are planned in the major cities of Baghdad, Basra, Niniveh and Süleymaniye.

They will initially be built as temporary hospitals in modular prefabricated construction, but in the long term they can serve as regular hospitals. Each hospital will have 100 beds, including 40 intensive care beds. In the short term, more than 7,000 patients will benefit directly. But the separate treatment of COVID-19 patients in separate facilities is beneficial for all patients in the country, because otherwise isolation could not be guaranteed.

“This is a quick and lean response to the pandemic in Iraq, but we have to win the race against time and build the hospitals before case numbers continue to escalate,” stresses KfW portfolio manager Moritz Remé. After many years of armed conflict the need for reconstruction in Iraq is particularly high. Income from the oil business has fallen due to the sharp drop in prices in recent months. Help from Germany is therefore urgently needed in Iraq.

(Source: KfW)

By John Lee.

Dar Al-Shifa Hospital has been opened in Al-Zubair district in Basra Province.

The hospital, a private-sector investment project which created 100 new jobs and cost $24 million, has a capacity of 60 beds, five operating theatres, an ophthalmology centre, a dental clinic, a maternity ward, an emergency department, laboratories and a pharmacy.

The Iraqi Government said it encourages private investment in Iraq’s health infrastructure as part of its strategy to build a modern and accessible healthcare system.

(Source: Iraqi Government)

By John Lee.

IFC, a member of the World Bank Group, is investing over $26 million in a new 161-bed hospital in Erbil in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq.

The facility will increase the availability of quality healthcare services and help address gaps in the country’s healthcare infrastructure. The $92 million Seema Hospital project is expected to open its doors in 2021. In addition to providing core health services, it will be one of the city’s first private hospitals with oncology, radiotherapy, and burn units.

Treatment capacity in existing public and private healthcare facilities in Iraq is limited, with damages to the system estimated at $2.3 billion because of the conflict, according to a World Bank report. The hospital is owned by the Macrom Company for General Trading.

Yaseen Al Bazzaz, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Macrom Company for General Trading, said

“Since opening our first hospital in 2006, we have grown into a leading provider of specialized health care services … Hundreds of patients are traveling desperately to neighboring countries for their medical needs. This will change once Seema Hospital opens and provides top-notch healthcare solutions.”

IFC is also contributing technical expertise, advising on environmental and social best practices, and providing guidance on corporate governance. The project is part of the World Bank Group’s strategy in Iraq to develop social infrastructure. Seema Hospital also will be one of the first buildings in Iraq to be certified by IFC EDGE, a platform that helps to determine the most cost-effective options for designing green buildings.

Tomasz Telma, IFC’s Senior Director for Manufacturing, Agribusiness, and Services, said:

“Iraq is a priority country for IFC, and we are committed to supporting its economic growth and health infrastructure … Investing in quality hospitals helps improve care, especially where there is often limited access to effective secondary and tertiary facilities, and introduce expertise, technology, and best practices to these markets.”  

IFC has increased its investments in Iraq during the last decade. Its committed portfolio stands at about $254 million, up from $20 million in 2010.

As Iraq and other countries battle COVID-19, the World Bank Group, in response to the crisis, has announced $14 billion package of financing to help support  countries to strengthen health systems and improve disease surveillance worldwide.

(Source: IFC)

Even after the military defeat of ISIS, the Netherlands will continue working to ensure security and stability in Iraq and the wider region. Foreign minister Stef Blok made this point during his trip to Jordan and Iraq. ‘We have to do this to prevent ISIS from regaining strength,’ he said.

Since the Netherlands joined the international fight against ISIS in 2014, the campaign has enjoyed great success. Almost all the territory once controlled by the group has been retaken. More than 7 million people have been freed from ISIS’s rule, and displaced people are returning to their homes and resuming their lives.

‘Now that ISIS has been defeated militarily, the focus is shifting to post-war reconstruction,’ Mr Blok said. ‘Putting ISIS combatants on trial is also crucial. Security and stability are preconditions for proceeding with the next phase. The Netherlands is working to strengthen its ties with Iraq and Jordan. That’s why I think it’s important for me to be here, so that we can set to work together on enhancing security.’

The Dutch partnership with Iraq and Jordan has already taken off. For example, last month in The Hague Mr Blok and Jordanian King Abdullah II both took part in the international ‘Aqaba meetings’ on counterterrorism.

Stability

A year ago Iraq was declared liberated from ISIS. In 2019 Dutch efforts will focus on capacity building in Iraq’s security sector. About 70 Dutch military personnel are currently training Iraqi security forces, including Kurdish Peshmerga. ‘The work of these Dutch trainers has great added value,’ said the Dutch foreign minister. ‘Their labours will equip Iraq to meet its own future security needs.’

Stability in Iraq is in the Netherlands’ interests. It will reduce the threat of terrorism, lower the risk of new refugee flows, and increase the likelihood of return for displaced people. ‘I’m seeing here with my own eyes how much devastation ISIS’s terror caused,’ said Mr Blok. ‘It’s in this phase above all, as Iraq rebuilds, that the Netherlands can help the country ensure that its victory over ISIS is a lasting one. That will allow the displaced and the refugees to return home.’

Construction and recovery

During his visit to the Iraqi city of Fallujah, the Dutch minister reopened a hospital that had been damaged in the fighting. ‘There was a huge battle against ISIS in Fallujah,’ he said. ‘This is the furthest point the group reached in its advance towards Baghdad, which is only a few dozen kilometres from here. Until recently, following ISIS’s devastating attack, Fallujah was cut off from the world. The fact that this hospital can now once more open its doors speaks volumes about how far Iraq has come.’

With support from a development cooperation fund, the Netherlands financed the rebuilding of the Fallujah Teaching Hospital and repairs to the city’s iconic bridge over the Euphrates, which Mr Blok also visited while he was in Fallujah. Alongside this support, additional Dutch aid to the region is helping restabilise it.

Refugees

Over the past few years, the fighting with ISIS turned millions of people into refugees. The consequences have been felt not only in the region but also in Europe, including the Netherlands. Mr Blok visited a refugee camp in Jordan: ‘The countries around Syria are bearing a heavy burden,’ he said. ‘Bear in mind that almost one person in ten in Jordan today is a Syrian refugee.’ The Netherlands is helping by funding jobs and education for these refugees and supporting Jordanian communities that are hosting them.

Dutch F-16s

The Netherlands, Jordan and Iraq are all members of the anti-ISIS coalition. Over the past few years Jordan has hosted the F16s that the Netherlands has committed to the fight. Now that their deployment has reached its end, the F16s are about to return to the Netherlands. Mr Blok paid a visit to the 150 Dutch military personnel in Jordan who will be heading home in a few weeks. ‘These men and women have made an essential contribution to the often fierce battle against ISIS, and I want to thank them for everything they’ve done,’ he said.

(Source: Govt of the Netherlands)

The Ministry of Health/Environment and the National Investment Commission (NIC) in coordination with Babil Governorate and Najaf Governorate are pleased to announce the investment opportunity of {Operating, managing and sustaining} of Imam Sadiq Hospital in Babil  and Najaf Hospital in Najaf according to investment law no. (13) for the year 2006, as amended.

Investors, companies and specialized sides are invited to submit their offers (commercial and technical offers providing that they include their vision of improving the medical services and scaling up performance on servicing and training the staff according to the standards approved by the Ministry of health with attaching the feasibility study knowing that all the above mentioned points shall be taken into consideration in evaluating the submitted offers) to the Contracts Section in the Ministry of Health and the National Investment Commission within (60) days from the date of publishing the announcement.

For any further information or fixing a date to visit the hospitals, please contact the following numbers:

  • 07822668818/ Dr. Nawras – DG – Ministry of health
  • 07823527029/ Dr. Adel –Manager of Imam Sadiq hospital
  • Or to send email to : healthit.2017@gmail.com
  • Please visit the Contracts section in the Ministry of Health to receive the investment profile

(Source: National Investment Commission)

The Ministry of Health (MOH) and the National Investment Commission (NIC) have announced an investment opportunity in Ibn Sina (Avicenna) hospital (rehabilitation, operation and management) in accordance with the investment law no. (13) for the year 2006, as amended.

Willing investors, companies or organizations are to present their (Commercial and Technical) offers to the Contracts departments of (MOH) and (NIC) according to the conditions stated below within a period of (45 days) from the date of publishing this announcement.

Provisions:

  • Investor shall undertake rehabilitating and developing the hospital (buildings, equipment and medical supplies) under the supervision of the Ministry of Health.
  • Medical and health care provided to patients shall be according to international standards adopted by World Health Organization. The company or the investor is required to prove applying ISO standards.
  • Investor is to submit work progress plan for developing the hospital, modernizing medical equipment and establishing quite new medical departments.
  • Submitting economic and technical feasibility study for the project by the investor (including cost and time required).
  • Providing a list of the similar projects implemented by the investor in or outside Iraq.
  • The hospital is to be managed by the investing company in cooperation with the current management team. Technically the hospital is to be run by the investing company which shall be allowed to employ non- Iraqi workers.
  • The applying companies or investors must have an establishment certificate issued by one of the European countries, USA, Japan or in partnership with a company of one of these countries and work according to its standards (prove by applying a certificate).
  • The investing company is to provide what prove the scientific and technical qualification of all work appliers in order to be reviewed by a specialized committee assigned by (MOH).
  • Allocating a royalty rate for (MOH) out of the achieved revenues, priority is to be given to the highest rate.
  • Investment term shall not be less than 5 years; renewable provided the approval of both parties.
  • Project is covered by the provisions of the investment law no. (13) for the year 2006, as amended.

For further enquiry please contact:

07901908668, 07812281221

Or send email to:

Yaserhm2003@yahoo.com

Ibnsinahospital2016@gmail.com

(Source: National Investment Commission)

Australian company Aspen Medical has been contracted by the World Health Organization (WHO) to provide healthcare professionals and hospital management at a 48-bed field hospital south of Mosul in northern Iraq.

The field hospital was established by WHO at the urgent request of the Ministry of Health in Iraq. WHO is coordinating a number of organisations providing trauma care in the conflict zone.

Aspen Medical will initially be providing a team of over 80 personnel to the facility including emergency physicians, surgeons, anaesthetists, nurses, midwives, neonatal specialists, obstetricians and paramedics.

In addition to the clinical team, Aspen Medical will be providing management, logistics, security, administration and operations specialists to the field hospital.  The Aspen Medical team will work alongside 48 national health personnel of different cadres already recruited to support trauma care at the hospital.

Glenn Keys, Co-Executive Chairman and co-founder of Aspen Medical, said:

“ISIL completely destroyed the healthcare infrastructure and now the world has an opportunity to help the long-suffering civilians of Mosul.  Working in partnership with other national and international organisations in the region, our collective challenge is to ensure access and availability of a high quality of medical care for those fleeing Western Mosul.”

Dr Andrew Walker, Co-Executive Chairman and co-founder of Aspen Medical, said;

“This won’t be a job for the faint-hearted.  We are honoured to be a critical part of this international humanitarian response and we look forward to working closely with WHO and the Ninewa Directorate of Health in Iraq.”

With the commencement of the offensive in Mosul, there is likely to be a significant increase in trauma casualties.  Mosul is a city of about 1.2 million people and casualties have been high.  Nearly half the casualties are civilians and this includes a high proportion of children.

(Source: Aspen Medical)

Statement by the Co-Hosts Canada, Germany, Japan, Kuwait, The Netherlands, and the United States at the July 20 Pledging Conference in Support of Iraq

Over $2 billion in new money has been pledged for the people of Iraq in response to Da’esh’s campaign of tyranny that has resulted in enormous suffering, deprivation, and devastation for the Iraqi people.

To help address the grave conditions faced by those displaced in Iraq, the international community has surged forward to provide desperately needed humanitarian support such as food, water, and shelter for those in need, and to help create the conditions that will allow the safe and voluntary return of displaced families to liberated areas as quickly as possible.

The foundations for long-term stability can be achieved if Iraq’s humanitarian crisis is alleviated and its citizens are able to return to their homes safely, with access to basic services, healthcare, and education, and hope for economic prosperity.

As a result of the conference, led by the co-hosts Canada, Germany, Japan, Kuwait, The Netherlands, and the United States, the international community mobilized to meet near-term funding requirements for Iraq in four critical-need areas:

  • humanitarian assistance;
  • demining;
  • UNDP’s Funding Facility for Immediate Stabilization;
  • UNDP’s new Funding Facility for Expanded Stabilization (FFES), endorsed by Prime Minister Abadi to provide pivotal, medium-term stabilization initiatives to foster resiliency and recovery in Da’esh liberated areas.

The humanitarian assistance raised yesterday primarily supports United Nations agencies operating in Iraq, as well as other international organizations and non-governmental organizations.

Through these organizations, the international community has provided resources for assistance to every governorate in Iraq, helping people who need it most—ultimately saving lives and alleviating human suffering amid daily threats of violence from Da’esh.

Statement by the Co-Hosts Canada, Germany, Japan, Kuwait, The Netherlands, and the United States at the July 20 Pledging Conference in Support of Iraq

Over $2 billion in new money has been pledged for the people of Iraq in response to Da’esh’s campaign of tyranny that has resulted in enormous suffering, deprivation, and devastation for the Iraqi people.

To help address the grave conditions faced by those displaced in Iraq, the international community has surged forward to provide desperately needed humanitarian support such as food, water, and shelter for those in need, and to help create the conditions that will allow the safe and voluntary return of displaced families to liberated areas as quickly as possible.

The foundations for long-term stability can be achieved if Iraq’s humanitarian crisis is alleviated and its citizens are able to return to their homes safely, with access to basic services, healthcare, and education, and hope for economic prosperity.

As a result of the conference, led by the co-hosts Canada, Germany, Japan, Kuwait, The Netherlands, and the United States, the international community mobilized to meet near-term funding requirements for Iraq in four critical-need areas:

  • humanitarian assistance;
  • demining;
  • UNDP’s Funding Facility for Immediate Stabilization;
  • UNDP’s new Funding Facility for Expanded Stabilization (FFES), endorsed by Prime Minister Abadi to provide pivotal, medium-term stabilization initiatives to foster resiliency and recovery in Da’esh liberated areas.

The humanitarian assistance raised yesterday primarily supports United Nations agencies operating in Iraq, as well as other international organizations and non-governmental organizations.

Through these organizations, the international community has provided resources for assistance to every governorate in Iraq, helping people who need it most—ultimately saving lives and alleviating human suffering amid daily threats of violence from Da’esh.

By John Lee.

The UAE government is set to start work on two new hospital projects to serve Syrian refugees and displaced Iraqis in Kurdistan.

The projects, which will include an eye treatment centre, are being carried out with the help of Emirates Red Crescent (ERC).

The ERC has already opened a number of new projects for refugees in the region, including the 58-bed Ataya Hospital for Childhood and Motherhood in Erbil, and a camp with 632 serviced residential units.

It also laid the foundation stone for a new fever hospital.

(Source:Trade Arabia)