MAN Energy Solutions has successfully commissioned six MAN 18V32/40 engines in a cement factory in Samawa, Iraq, and delivered five more engines of the same type to a freshwater-treatment plant in Basra.

“The country’s infrastructure has suffered greatly from armed conflict in the past and the re-electrification of Iraq is pivotal for further growth and new prosperity. We are very happy that our engines will bring such tangible, positive benefits to the Iraqi people,” said Waldemar Wiesner, Head of Region MEA (Middle-East Africa), Power Plant Sales, MAN Energy Solutions.

Defying the desert

The six engines in Samawa form the backbone of a power plant that will generate around 54 MW of electrical energy for a new cement plant owned by Iraqi producer, Kairat Al Abar Iraqi Co. (KAAI).

Samawa has a population of around 150,000 and is located on the River Euphrates, half way between Baghdad and the Persian Gulf. Conditions locally are testing with a rainfall of just 100 mm over the course of a year, while temperatures peak at over 40°C from June to September. “The heat and dry desert climate create demanding conditions for industrial processes,” said Wiesner. “However, our MAN 32/40 engines are particularly robust and well capale of delivering a reliable power supply under such extreme climatic conditions.”

Fresh water in Basra

Five MAN 18V32/40 engines with a total capacity of 45 MW will guarantee the energy supply of a freshwater-treatment plant in Basra, a city with 2.5 million people located on the Persian Gulf. Normally, the plant operates with electricity from the public grid. However, since Iraq’s energy supply still fluctuates strongly, the MAN engines will serve as an important backup to ensure the reliable operation of the plant.

“In Iraq, more than five million people have only limited access to drinking water or sanitary facilities. With this new freshwater plant, the quality of life for the people of Basra will increase significantly,” said Wiesner. “In the event of power failures, which unfortunately still occur frequently, our engines will ensure a stable energy supply so that Basra’s population has access to fresh water at all times.”

(Source: MAN Energy Solutions)

This week the German Federal Foreign Office bolstered IOM’s Community Policing (CP) programme in Iraq by providing an additional 1.7 million Euros, raising Germany’s total contributions to this important effort to 5.7 million Euros.

IOM’s CP programme aims to contribute to enhanced security and stability in Iraq, by facilitating dialogue between communities and law enforcement actors, through Community Policing Forums (CPF) in communities affected by conflict and displacement.

In the last three years 101 Community Policing Forums (CPFs) have been established across Iraq with the support of IOM. CPFs aim to resolve a variety of security concerns at the community level, including those related to housing, land and property (HLP) disputes, access to water and electricity, civil unrest, documentation for internally displaced persons (IDPs) and returnees, child protection, human trafficking, sexual harassment and domestic violence.

The German Ambassador to Iraq, Dr. Cyrill Nunn, said:

“Community Policing is an important strategy to bring together socially fragmented communities in Iraq to peacefully resolve security related problems. Germany supports Community Policing to build and strengthen mutual trust between citizens and law enforcement agencies, contributing to safe and stable communities – the building blocks of a stable Iraq.”

CPFs are facilitated by a CP officer from the local police department and by elected community members. IOM guides CPFs in the development of community safety plans which identify the most critical security and safety issues that can be addressed and tackled by the community and the police.

Gerard Waite, IOM Chief of Mission in Iraq commented:

Issues are resolved mainly through identifying the correct entity to refer to, either law enforcement, public institutions, civil society organizations, or the community themselves.”

“The success of these forums can be seen through a variety of indicators, such as a decrease in crime, an increase in the level of cooperation from the community in solving security problems, and less use of force by police towards members of the community.

Brigadier Khalid Falah Kadhim, head of Iraq CP Directorate within the Government of Iraq’s Ministry of Interior, testifies to the positive impact the CP model has had on local police structures at the community level:

“The logistical and technical support provided by IOM to rebuild infrastructure and strengthen the capacity of community policing has played a fundamental role in peace building in communities, and we are thankful to the Government of Germany for providing this support.”

(Source: IOM)

The German Ministry of Foreign Affairs has contributed an additional EUR 22 million to the UNDP Funding Facility for Stabilization (FFS), which finances fast-track initiatives in areas of Iraq liberated from the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL). This brings the Ministry’s contribution to EUR 80.2 million and the total support from the Government of Germany to EUR 209.9 million.

Acting UNDP Resident Representative for Iraq, Mr. Gerardo Noto, said:

“Enormous progress continues to be made across the liberated areas of Iraq, with seventy percent of those who were displaced during the conflict now returned home. UNDP deeply appreciates the timely funding provided by the German Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and while there remains a great deal of work to do, this generous contribution will help re-establish public services and rebuild social cohesion in the most vulnerable areas.”

The German Ambassador to Iraq, H.E. Dr. Cyrill Nunn, said:

“Germany continues to support Iraq’s stabilization efforts to shore up the progress made to date. As we look to the new Government to step forward to take increasing ownership of stabilisation and more long term development efforts, we will remain a committed partner for the people of Iraq and a strong supporter of the efforts of the United Nations.”

In addition to its Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Germany also contributes to FFS through its Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development implemented by KfW, the German development bank.

At the request of the Government of Iraq, UNDP established the FFS in June 2015 to facilitate the return of displaced Iraqis, lay the groundwork for reconstruction and recovery, and safeguard against the resurgence of violence and extremism.

The Facility has a portfolio of over 3,000 projects – half of which are already completed – in the provinces of Ninewah, Anbar, Salah Al-Din, Diyala and Kirkuk.

The FFS repairs essential public infrastructure such as electricity, water and sewage system grids. It rebuilds schools, health centres and homes, and provides people with short-term employment through public works schemes in areas directly impacted by ISIL.

This investment in critical services sets the stage for recovery and resilience work, as well as longer-term reconstruction and development activities. Over 95 percent of all stabilization projects are carried out by local private sector companies, providing a key source of employment for local people.

(Source: UN)

Cash-for-Work project in Halabja paves a safer and easier road to school for local children

42 host community members, IDPs and refugees employed to restore roads and walkways that will enable safe access to schools and markets for families in Halabja.

To neighbours in the communities of Azadi and Sirwan, in northern Iraq, paved roads mean much more than improved accessibility for cars. Once loose dust and rock, the road network connecting homes and markets posed a hazard for children during the regions season of heavy rainfall.

“They had to put those plastic bags and boots which was especially difficult for the kids to go to school,” described 15-year-old Shahad, an IDP from Baghdad.

“Especially in this area in winter we have a high rate of rainfall. And the land here was agricultural land before – so when it rains, it becomes mud, also posing health-hazards for pedestrians,” added Mr. Omed Noori Hama-Salih, Supervising Engineer, Municipality of Sirwan Subdistrict.

UNDP’s Iraq Crisis Response and Resilience Programme (ICRRP) recently supported a project that would enable the Governorate of Halabja to restore this essential basic service.

Following the launch in September, 42 individuals (host community members, internally displaced people (IDPs) and refugees) received temporary employment opportunities to work on the project as engineers, labourers and administrative support.

This project is one of 28 that were made possible with generous funding from the Federal Government of Germany, supporting the construction and restoration of critical services such as sewerage, electricity, water and roads for some 680,000 people across the Sulaimaniyah & Halabja Governorates and Raparin & Garmiyan Administrations, in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq.

In Azadi and Sirwan, IDPs, refugees and host community members are working together to improve the road and walkway networks for the benefit of all 1,500 community members. “In the past years, this was muddy and all children could not go to school easily and people could not go to do their services and visit market, but now when it will be paved of course it will ease our lives,” said Mr. Othman Aziz, a resident since 1978. “We consider that we will be having a new life because then our kids can go to school easily and our families will have an easy and nice access road to go and run their daily lives.”

Since 2014, Halabja Governorate has become host to more than 653 refugees and 7,177 IDPs, leaving their homes to find safety and security. Today, the pressure to ensure the provision of basic infrastructure and services is intensified by severe financial crisis, ultimately affecting the quality of life in the region for the host communities, as well as the IDPs and refugees they host.

In Azadi and Sirwan, IDPs, refugees and host community members are working together to improve the road and walkway networks for the benefit of all 1,500 community members. “In the past years, this was muddy and all children could not go to school easily and people could not go to do their services and visit market, but now when it will be paved of course it will ease our lives,” said Mr. Othman Aziz, a resident since 1978.

“We consider that we will be having a new life because then our kids can go to school easily and our families will have an easy and nice access road to go and run their daily lives.”

Since 2014, Halabja Governorate has become host to more than 653 refugees and 7,177 IDPs, leaving their homes to find safety and security. Today, the pressure to ensure the provision of basic infrastructure and services is intensified by severe financial crisis, ultimately affecting the quality of life in the region for the host communities, as well as the IDPs and refugees they host.

(Source: UNDP)

Ministry of Interior officially inaugurates the Local Police Service Road Map

On 12 November 2018 Lt. Gen. Moafaq Abdulhadi Tawfik, Deputy Minister for Police Affairs Agency officially inaugurated the Local Police Service Road Map of Iraq at the Ministry of Interior, in a ceremony held in the Agency headquarters in Baghdad.

The overall objectives of the Road Map are firstly to put in place transition security arrangements from Iraqi Security Forces to Local Police in post – ISIL Iraq and, to develop a framework with specific emphasis on maintaining trust between Iraqi Local Police Service and the public, as well as to foster collaborative partnerships between the police and other agencies of the Criminal Justice System.

The Local Police Service Road Map therefore, provides a strategy to transition the country from a military oriented focus on security to one of civil security authority in local security matters and, it prioritizes the following Police Core -Functions:

  1. Security and Protection Management
  2. Crime Management
  3. Traffic Enforcement Management
  4. Improving Effectiveness of Local Police Service (IELP), and
  5. Community Policing.

Furthermore, the Road Map also highlights six crosscutting supporting functions:

  1. Finance
  2. Human Resources (HR)
  3. Training
  4. Equipment
  5. Infrastructure, and
  6. Information and Communication Technology (ICT).

Ministry of Interior appointed Committee of senior officials with strategic advice and assistance from UNDP Iraq developed the Road Map.

Lt. Gen. Moafaq Abdulhadi Tawfik, Deputy Minister for Police Affairs Agency said:

I extend my sincere gratitude and thanks to the Road Map Committee for their exceptional work in developing this important document that will guide the Local Police Service in Post- ISIL Iraq.

“The Road Map is timely and it complements directly to the New Government Programme’s vision to transition of internal security to Local Police. On behalf of the Police Affairs Agency and the Ministry of Interior I also extend my sincere thanks to UNDP for its advice and assistance in this important work.

UNDP Acting Country Director Gerardo Noto added:

…improving Local Police Service is an identified key priority within the Government of Iraq’s ongoing Security Sector Reform Programme under the system priority Criminal Justice and Law Enforcement that is supported by UNDP and International Partners.

“Therefore the successful implementation of the Local Police Service Road Map will be a critical milestone in restoring public security services, rule of law and sustainable peace in Iraq.  UNDP will continue to facilitate advice and assistance to the Police Affairs Agency and Ministry of Interior in this critical work in the coming months.

UNDP is grateful to Germany for its generous funding to carry out this important work in Iraq.

(Source: UNDP)

UNDP and Germany support the Reform Process on the Conduct of Criminal Investigations in Iraq

On 7 November 2018 the German Ambassador to Iraq, Dr Cyrill Nunn received in the German Embassy UNDP-Iraq Country Office representatives and Iraqi representatives of the Higher Judicial Council, the Ministry of the Interior and the Office of the National Security Advisor to discuss the state of reform of criminal investigations in Iraq.

The Iraqi representatives had returned from a study trip to Berlin to observe on site and discuss with German practitioners how criminal investigations are conducted in Germany.

The Iraqi officials are members of the Criminal Justice Working Group who have been working for over a year on reviewing how criminal investigations are conducted by the police in Iraq. To streamline the conduct of criminal investigations and to make them more effective and reliable, the Iraqi working group produced a draft on Standard Operating Procedures for Criminal Investigations.

In Berlin the Iraqi delegation held discussions with German criminal justice experts of the Ministry of Justice and Consumer Protection, police agents of the Federal Investigation Agency, prosecutors of the Berlin Prosecutor General’s Office, the station commander of a Berlin district police station, senior Berlin state police detectives and administrators of the detention on remand facility in Berlin-Moabit.

Ambassador Dr Cyrill Nunn expressed his hope that the visit to Berlin to review German investigation procedures have provided the Iraqi criminal justice working group “with ideas and the right stimulus to identify appropriate mechanisms to advance the criminal investigative process in Iraq.”

Acting UNDP-Iraq Country Director Gerardo Noto added that “UNDP will continue facilitating the working group meetings for the finalization of the procedural guidelines so that they could be adopted by the Government of Iraq, as well as supporting their implementation to strengthen the criminal justice system in Iraq.”

The development and implementation of unified Standard Operating Procedures for Criminal Investigations is an identified key priority within the Government of Iraq’s ongoing Security Sector Reform Programme under the system priority Criminal Justice and Law Enforcement that is supported by UNDP and International Partners.

(Source: UNDP)

By John Lee.

Both Germany’s Siemens and US-based GE have signed deals with the Iraqi government on Sunday to provide major additional power generating capacity to Iraq.

Following a hotly-contested competition, the two rivals are to share the work, with GE supplying 14 Gigawatts (GW), and Siemens 11 GW.

(Sources: GE, Siemens)

Siemens in landmark MoU to repower Iraq, support economic prosperity

Siemens and the Ministry of Electricity of the Republic of Iraq have entered a milestone agreement to seek the implementation of the company’s roadmap for repowering Iraq. Signed by Qasim Al-Fahdawi, Minister of Electricity, and Joe Kaeser, President and CEO of Siemens AG, the Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) will examine a series of short, medium and long-term plans to meet the reconstruction goals of Iraq and support the country’s economic development.

“Our commitment to the Iraqi people stands strong. We promised them to achieve affordable and reliable power supply, help with anti-corruption, build schools and hospitals and create thousands of jobs. Education, training and developing local skills and talent are key elements for us to contribute to building the New Iraq. Today’s agreement on the Siemens roadmap is a significant step towards fulfilling that promise,” said Joe Kaeser. “We are ready to start and look forward to working closely with the Iraqi government to immediately produce noticeable improvements for the Iraqi people.”

In September, Siemens announced the donation of a smart health clinic that would be powered by solar energy and equipped with Siemens medical devices. The clinic would have the capacity to treat up to 10,000 patients per year. This was in addition to pledging to fund the first modular “School of the Future” in Iraq, provide a USD 60 million software grant for universities in the country, and train more than 1,000 Iraqis in vocational education.

Under the “Roadmap for the Electrification of the New Iraq”, Siemens is ready to add 11 gigawatts (GW) of power generation capacity over four years to ensure 23 million Iraqis across the country have reliable and sustainable electricity 24/7. This would boost current generation capacity by almost 50 percent. The economic viability of the plan is secured by billions of US dollars in potential fuel savings and revenue generation for the electricity sector, supporting the development of the future Iraq. The company also envisions the creation of tens of thousands of jobs over the course of the projects. The roadmap emphasizes people at its core – and is the result of a 12-month study to develop a comprehensive and tailored redevelopment plan. It focuses on energy, education, compliance and financing, aiming to advance sustainable economic development, national security and quality of life for the people of Iraq.

Siemens’ Iraq Roadmap outlines eight objectives to benefit the people of Iraq, the country’s national security and its economic development. These include reducing energy losses, introducing smart grids, strengthening the transmission grid, modernizing existing power plants, adding new generation capacities in deprived areas, connecting Iraq to the Arab Gulf region, putting Iraq’s national resources to work, and investing in its people.

Modernizing the country’s energy infrastructure is intended to be completed in stages, from immediate improvement for up to 300,000 people, which can be operational within three months, to medium and long-term projects that require between 10 and 24 months’ completion time and beyond. The company will also assist Iraq’s government in securing appropriate finance packages provided by international commercial banks, Export Credit Agencies and supported by the German Government.

The roadmap lays out plans to use Iraq’s valuable natural resources more efficiently by utilizing flare gas capture and treatment technologies to deliver a domestic source of fuel to Iraq’s power generation sector, as well as create a long-term source of revenue for the government to finance power generation, transmission, and distribution projects.

As part of its commitment to driving sustainable growth, Siemens intends to support social development in Iraq with a series of training and education programs. This includes technical and vocational training as well as transparency and anti-corruption education, in order to build a pool of highly skilled, local talent with a culture of compliance. Under the patronage of the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ), Siemens aims to provide vocational training, starting with 1,000 young Iraqis.

Siemens initially presented the Roadmap to the Government of Iraq during the Iraq Reconstruction Conference in Kuwait, in February 2018. At the same time, the company signed a declaration of intent with BMZ with both parties agreeing to jointly contribute to the reconstruction and development of Iraq in areas including technical and vocational training, as well as transparency and anti-corruption.

(Source: Siemens)

By John Lee.

Germany’s Siemens may have to share a $15-billion contract to supply power-generation equipment to Iraq with US rival General Electric (GE).

The Financial Times reports that although it appeared that Siemens would win the deal, the Trump administration successfully intervened on behalf of GE.

Last month German business newspaper Handelsblatt reported that Chancellor Angela Merkel had personally intervened with Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi to persuade the Iraqi Government to award the contract to Siemens.

(Source: Financial Times)

The Federal Republic of Germany, UNDP’s Iraq Crisis Response and Resilience Programme (ICRRP), along with the administrative authorities of Halabja and Sulaimaniyah Governorates and Garmiyan and Raparin Administrations today initiated 12 projects to improve essential services for an estimated 680,000 people.

The projects target critical needs in the electricity, water, roads, and sewerage sectors and provide jobs for 819 people – including host community members, Syrian refugees and IDPs.

At the ceremony to launch the projects, the Deputy Governor of Sulaimaniyah, H.E Mr. Ahmed Ali Ahmed, said:

“Today we are signing agreements with UNDP to launch infrastructure projects with a total budget of close to US $2.5 million across Sulaimaniyah Governorate and Garmiyan and Raparin Administrations. This generous support from the Federal Republic of Germany, and collaboration with UNDP, comes as the KR-I continues to suffer from a severe economic crisis that began in 2013.

“Many challenges and increased pressure due to the large number of IDPs and refugees who are settling in the Kurdistan Region will be addressed through these fundamental basic-services projects, including improved electricity, water, roads, and sewerage systems.”

The Deputy Governor of Halabja, H.E Mr. Kawa  Ali Kareem, added:

“On behalf of the inhabitants of Halabja Governorate, including the IDPs, refugees and host communities, the office of Governor of Halabja expresses sincere gratitude and appreciation to the Federal Republic of Germany and UNDP’s Iraq Crisis Response and Resilience Programme (ICRRP) for supporting implementation of four important basic services projects that will improve internal roads and sewerage systems.

“Implementation of these infrastructure projects will benefit close to 107,000 community members and create over 255 temporary job opportunities in Halabja alone.”

The construction of effective wastewater and sewerage networks across Sulaimaniyah City, Qaladiza, Hajiawa and Khurmal Sub-Districts, and Hawari-New Neighbourhood in Kifri City, will reduce environmental pollution and the spread of diseases amongst vulnerable populations during periods of high rainfall. In Sulaimaniyah City, the construction of an electricity distribution network will provide regular electricity supply to hospitals, schools, and water supply stations – benefitting the whole community.

In 2018, with continuous funding from the Federal Republic of Germany, ICRRP and governorate authorities in the Kurdistan Region or Iraq have supported 28 projects benefiting over 1,240,121 host community members, IDPs and refugees and providing livelihood opportunities for 1,273 individuals.

UNDP’s Iraq Crisis Response and Resilience Programme (ICRRP) promotes the recovery and resilience of communities vulnerable to multi-dimensional shocks associated with large-scale returns and protracted displacement of Iraqis and Syrian refugees.  This is achieved through a medium-term, programming integrating crisis management capacity building, rehabilitating basic service infrastructure, livelihood recovery and social cohesion.

(Source: UNDP)