By John Lee.

SOS International (SOSi) of Reston, Virginia, has been awarded a $40-million (46.6 billion Iraqi dinars) contract for base life support at the Besmaya Compound in Iraq.

The estimated completion date is 1st January, 2017.

One bid was solicited with one received.

SOSi recently won a similarly-sized contract for base life support at Camp Taji.

(Source: US Dept of Defense)

(Picture: Julian Setian, CEO of SOS International)

By John Lee.

SOS International (SOSi) of Reston, Virginia, has been awarded a $40-million (46.6 billion Iraqi dinars) contract for base life support at the Besmaya Compound in Iraq.

The estimated completion date is 1st January, 2017.

One bid was solicited with one received.

SOSi recently won a similarly-sized contract for base life support at Camp Taji.

(Source: US Dept of Defense)

(Picture: Julian Setian, CEO of SOS International)

By John Lee.

Reuters reports that exports from Iraq’s southern terminals have averaged 3.00 million barrels per day in the first 15 days of June, up from 2.69 million bpd in the month of May.

The increase is due in part to the splitting of Basra crude into two grades, Basra Heavy and Basra Light.

But exports via Ceyhan in Turkey have averaged 200,000 bpd so far in June, less than half of May’s level of 451,000 bpd.

Taken together, Iraq’s oil exports have averaged 3.20 million bpd in the first half of June, putting Iraq on course for a record high.

(Source: Reuters)

By John Lee.

Reuters reports that exports from Iraq’s southern terminals have averaged 3.00 million barrels per day in the first 15 days of June, up from 2.69 million bpd in the month of May.

The increase is due in part to the splitting of Basra crude into two grades, Basra Heavy and Basra Light.

But exports via Ceyhan in Turkey have averaged 200,000 bpd so far in June, less than half of May’s level of 451,000 bpd.

Taken together, Iraq’s oil exports have averaged 3.20 million bpd in the first half of June, putting Iraq on course for a record high.

(Source: Reuters)

U.S. and coalition military forces have continued to attack Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant terrorists in Syria and Iraq, Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve officials reported.

Officials reported details of the latest strikes, which took place between 8 a.m. Wednesday and 8 a.m. Thursday, local time, noting that assessments of results are based on initial reports.

Airstrikes in Syria

Bomber, attack, fighter and remotely piloted aircraft conducted six airstrikes in Syria:

  • Near Hasakah, an airstrike destroyed two ISIL tunnel systems.
  • Near Dayr Az Zawr, an airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit, destroying an ISIL vehicle.
  • Near Tal Abyad, four airstrikes struck one large and two small ISIL tactical units, destroying two ISIL fighting positions, two ISIL vehicles and an ISIL excavator.

Airstrikes in Iraq

Attack, fighter, bomber and remotely piloted aircraft conducted 16 airstrikes in Iraq, approved by the Iraqi Ministry of Defense:

  • Near Baghdadi, an airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit, destroying an ISIL vehicle.
  • Near Huwayjah, an airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit, destroying an ISIL vehicle.
  • Near Beiji, an airstrike destroyed an ISIL pontoon bridge.
  • Near Fallujah, two airstrikes struck an ISIL tactical unit, destroying two ISIL rocket rails and an ISIL bunker.
  • Near Ramadi, four airstrikes struck multiple defensive obstacles and fighting positions.
  • Near Sinjar, two airstrikes struck an ISIL tactical unit, destroying two ISIL heavy machine guns, two ISIL buildings and an ISIL excavator.
  • Near Tal Afar, five airstrikes struck an ISIL tactical unit, an ISIL fighting position and an ISIL bunker. Two ISIL buildings, two ISIL heavy machine guns and an ISIL vehicle bomb were destroyed, and land features were struck to deny ISIL a tactical advantage.

Part of Operation Inherent Resolve

The strikes were conducted as part of Operation Inherent Resolve, the operation to eliminate the ISIL terrorist group and the threat they pose to Iraq, Syria, the region, and the wider international community.

The destruction of ISIL targets in Syria and Iraq further limits the terrorist group’s ability to project terror and conduct operations, officials said.

Coalition nations conducting airstrikes in Iraq include the United States, Australia, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, France, Jordan, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom.

Coalition nations conducting airstrikes in Syria include the United States, Bahrain, Canada, Jordan, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates.

(Source: US Dept of Defense)

U.S. and coalition military forces have continued to attack Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant terrorists in Syria and Iraq, Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve officials reported.

Officials reported details of the latest strikes, which took place between 8 a.m. Wednesday and 8 a.m. Thursday, local time, noting that assessments of results are based on initial reports.

Airstrikes in Syria

Bomber, attack, fighter and remotely piloted aircraft conducted six airstrikes in Syria:

  • Near Hasakah, an airstrike destroyed two ISIL tunnel systems.
  • Near Dayr Az Zawr, an airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit, destroying an ISIL vehicle.
  • Near Tal Abyad, four airstrikes struck one large and two small ISIL tactical units, destroying two ISIL fighting positions, two ISIL vehicles and an ISIL excavator.

Airstrikes in Iraq

Attack, fighter, bomber and remotely piloted aircraft conducted 16 airstrikes in Iraq, approved by the Iraqi Ministry of Defense:

  • Near Baghdadi, an airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit, destroying an ISIL vehicle.
  • Near Huwayjah, an airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit, destroying an ISIL vehicle.
  • Near Beiji, an airstrike destroyed an ISIL pontoon bridge.
  • Near Fallujah, two airstrikes struck an ISIL tactical unit, destroying two ISIL rocket rails and an ISIL bunker.
  • Near Ramadi, four airstrikes struck multiple defensive obstacles and fighting positions.
  • Near Sinjar, two airstrikes struck an ISIL tactical unit, destroying two ISIL heavy machine guns, two ISIL buildings and an ISIL excavator.
  • Near Tal Afar, five airstrikes struck an ISIL tactical unit, an ISIL fighting position and an ISIL bunker. Two ISIL buildings, two ISIL heavy machine guns and an ISIL vehicle bomb were destroyed, and land features were struck to deny ISIL a tactical advantage.

Part of Operation Inherent Resolve

The strikes were conducted as part of Operation Inherent Resolve, the operation to eliminate the ISIL terrorist group and the threat they pose to Iraq, Syria, the region, and the wider international community.

The destruction of ISIL targets in Syria and Iraq further limits the terrorist group’s ability to project terror and conduct operations, officials said.

Coalition nations conducting airstrikes in Iraq include the United States, Australia, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, France, Jordan, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom.

Coalition nations conducting airstrikes in Syria include the United States, Bahrain, Canada, Jordan, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates.

(Source: US Dept of Defense)

This article was originally published by Niqash. Any opinions expressed are those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Attitude Adjustment: Are the US and Iran-Backed Militias Getting Friendlier?

Last week Captain Amir al-Saadi, whose unit is based in the Habbaniyah camp in the Anbar province, received a phone call that made him very happy.

Finally his troops, who were fighting the extremist group known as the Islamic State in the province, were going to get the weapons he had asked for months ago.

“It’s a miracle,” al-Saadi said. “Finally we’ve been able to get anti-tank weapons that are capable of destroying armoured vehicles. The Islamic State group has been using them against us by filling them with explosives and we haven’t been able to stop the vehicles because we didn’t have heavy enough weaponry. The government doesn’t have these kinds of weapons,” al-Saadi said. “But we heard that the US would supply us with them.”

Al-Saadi believes that his unit is finally getting the heavy weapons they wanted for so long because of “an agreement between the Shiite factions and the US that was brokered by the federal Iraqi government.” Previously, al-Saadi thinks, the US wouldn’t even send light weapons to the Iraqi army because they were so worried about these falling into the hands of Shiite militias. All this now seems to have changed, al-Saadi says.

In Iraq, criticism of the US’ role in the fight against the Islamic State, or IS, group had been going on for weeks, even months. Leading members of the Shiite Muslim militias involved had been critical of the US’ role in Iraq’s security crisis. They had even accused the US of aiding the Islamic State, or IS, group.

But over the past few days there seems to have been a serious attitude adjustment. The Shiite Muslim militias, which are mostly made up of volunteers and not part of the official Iraqi army but play an extremely important role in combatting the IS group anyway, have stopped criticising the US’ role through their various media outlets. Rumours spread by leaders of the militias, where they accused the US of dropping supplies to the IS group and thereby assumed they were allied with them, have not been repeated again.

This article was originally published by Niqash. Any opinions expressed are those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Attitude Adjustment: Are the US and Iran-Backed Militias Getting Friendlier?

Last week Captain Amir al-Saadi, whose unit is based in the Habbaniyah camp in the Anbar province, received a phone call that made him very happy.

Finally his troops, who were fighting the extremist group known as the Islamic State in the province, were going to get the weapons he had asked for months ago.

“It’s a miracle,” al-Saadi said. “Finally we’ve been able to get anti-tank weapons that are capable of destroying armoured vehicles. The Islamic State group has been using them against us by filling them with explosives and we haven’t been able to stop the vehicles because we didn’t have heavy enough weaponry. The government doesn’t have these kinds of weapons,” al-Saadi said. “But we heard that the US would supply us with them.”

Al-Saadi believes that his unit is finally getting the heavy weapons they wanted for so long because of “an agreement between the Shiite factions and the US that was brokered by the federal Iraqi government.” Previously, al-Saadi thinks, the US wouldn’t even send light weapons to the Iraqi army because they were so worried about these falling into the hands of Shiite militias. All this now seems to have changed, al-Saadi says.

In Iraq, criticism of the US’ role in the fight against the Islamic State, or IS, group had been going on for weeks, even months. Leading members of the Shiite Muslim militias involved had been critical of the US’ role in Iraq’s security crisis. They had even accused the US of aiding the Islamic State, or IS, group.

But over the past few days there seems to have been a serious attitude adjustment. The Shiite Muslim militias, which are mostly made up of volunteers and not part of the official Iraqi army but play an extremely important role in combatting the IS group anyway, have stopped criticising the US’ role through their various media outlets. Rumours spread by leaders of the militias, where they accused the US of dropping supplies to the IS group and thereby assumed they were allied with them, have not been repeated again.

The KRG’s Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR) notes the decision by the Seoul Western District Court in Korea to grant an application from the Korean National Oil Company (KNOC) ordering the Korea Times newspaper to delete all published articles relating to allegations by a Korean MP of a misuse of funds by the KRG and the Minister of Natural Resources, and to not post or distribute any similar articles in the future. All the articles have now been removed by the Korea Times.

In March, 2015, the Korean Times published a series of false and malicious claims by MP Chun Soon-ok of the main opposition party in Korea about legitimate contractual payments made in 2008 by KNOC as part of its production sharing contract to explore for oil in the Kurdistan Region.

The claims in the offending Korea Times articles were unfortunately spread by a number of politicians and news outlets in Kurdistan without checking the facts.

In its 8th June ruling on the suit brought by KNOC (referred to in the Court ruling as the “Creditor”) against the Korea Times (referred to as the “Debtor”), the Seoul Western District Court decided that the MP’s allegations were “not true.”

The Court declared: “There is no reason for this Court to make a conclusion that the money paid to the KRG by the Creditor is either bribery or was distributed to the close associates of [former President] Lee Myung-Bak.”

The Court further decided that a “capacity building bonus” paid by KNOC to KRG “is paid under the Contracts and the ground for payment is clear.”

The Court declared that the Debtor “had not been able to furnish any credible material supporting its allegation that the payment of bonuses under the contract is a bribery” or was given to “Mr Myung-Bak’s associates.”

The Court continued: “This Court finds that the Debtor’s posting of the articles… constitutes an act damaging to the reputation of the Creditor and as an infringement on personal rights of the creditor by stating false fact…”

The Court rejected the counter arguments by the Korea Times “because there is no sound ground for them.”

MNR is satisfied that the issue has now been clarified and ruled upon in the Korean courts.

(Source: KRG)

(Court image via Shutterstock)

U.S. and coalition military forces have continued to attack Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant terrorists in Syria and Iraq, Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve officials reported.

Officials reported details of the latest strikes, which took place between 8 a.m. Tuesday and 8 a.m. Wednesday, local time, noting that assessments of results are based on initial reports.

Airstrikes in Syria

Fighter and remotely piloted aircraft conducted four airstrikes in Syria:

  • Near Hasakah, two airstrikes struck an ISIL tactical unit, destroying two ISIL antenna arrays and an ISIL vehicle.
  • Near Aleppo, one airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit.
  • Near Kobani, one airstrike struck an ISIL large tactical unit.

Airstrikes in Iraq

Attack, bomber, fighter and remotely piloted aircraft conducted seven airstrikes in Iraq, approved by the Iraqi Ministry of Defense:

  • Near Baghdadi, one airstrike destroyed an ISIL resupply vehicle and an ISIL weapons cache.
  • Near Huwayjah, one airstrike struck an ISIL staging area.
  • Near Beiji, one airstrike destroyed two ISIL armored vehicles.
  • Near Mosul, one airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit and an ISIL mortar firing positon, destroying an ISIL structure.
  • Near Sinjar, three airstrikes struck an ISIL tactical unit, destroying three ISIL heavy machine guns, three ISIL fighting positons, three ISIL tunnel entrances, an ISIL structure and an ISIL rocket propelled grenade.

Part of Operation Inherent Resolve

The strikes were conducted as part of Operation Inherent Resolve, the operation to eliminate the ISIL terrorist group and the threat they pose to Iraq, Syria, the region, and the wider international community.

The destruction of ISIL targets in Syria and Iraq further limits the terrorist group’s ability to project terror and conduct operations, officials said.

Coalition nations conducting airstrikes in Iraq include the United States, Australia, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, France, Jordan, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom.

Coalition nations conducting airstrikes in Syria include the United States, Bahrain, Canada, Jordan, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates.

(Source: US Dept of Defense)