By John Lee.

Talks are reported to be continuing between Germany’s Siemens and the Iraqi Ministry of Electricity regarding a major investment in the country’s electricity infrastructure.

Lisa Davis (pictured), CEO of the Siemens Gas and Power Operating Company, and member of the corporation’s managing board, told The National last week that “discussions are ongoing”, adding, “we’re working on their timeline and within their structure to getting there as effectively as they can to bringing the projects to reality as they need.

Following a hotly-contested competition last year, it was agreed that Siemens and GE would share the work to upgrade they system, with GE supplying 14 gigawatts (GW), and Siemens 11 GW.

(Source: The National)

MAN Energy Solutions has successfully commissioned six MAN 18V32/40 engines in a cement factory in Samawa, Iraq, and delivered five more engines of the same type to a freshwater-treatment plant in Basra.

“The country’s infrastructure has suffered greatly from armed conflict in the past and the re-electrification of Iraq is pivotal for further growth and new prosperity. We are very happy that our engines will bring such tangible, positive benefits to the Iraqi people,” said Waldemar Wiesner, Head of Region MEA (Middle-East Africa), Power Plant Sales, MAN Energy Solutions.

Defying the desert

The six engines in Samawa form the backbone of a power plant that will generate around 54 MW of electrical energy for a new cement plant owned by Iraqi producer, Kairat Al Abar Iraqi Co. (KAAI).

Samawa has a population of around 150,000 and is located on the River Euphrates, half way between Baghdad and the Persian Gulf. Conditions locally are testing with a rainfall of just 100 mm over the course of a year, while temperatures peak at over 40°C from June to September. “The heat and dry desert climate create demanding conditions for industrial processes,” said Wiesner. “However, our MAN 32/40 engines are particularly robust and well capale of delivering a reliable power supply under such extreme climatic conditions.”

Fresh water in Basra

Five MAN 18V32/40 engines with a total capacity of 45 MW will guarantee the energy supply of a freshwater-treatment plant in Basra, a city with 2.5 million people located on the Persian Gulf. Normally, the plant operates with electricity from the public grid. However, since Iraq’s energy supply still fluctuates strongly, the MAN engines will serve as an important backup to ensure the reliable operation of the plant.

“In Iraq, more than five million people have only limited access to drinking water or sanitary facilities. With this new freshwater plant, the quality of life for the people of Basra will increase significantly,” said Wiesner. “In the event of power failures, which unfortunately still occur frequently, our engines will ensure a stable energy supply so that Basra’s population has access to fresh water at all times.”

(Source: MAN Energy Solutions)

From The Economist.

America is trying to get more out of its relationship with Iraq

US President Donald Trump thinks America is being ripped off. “We have spent $7trn—trillion with a T—$7trn in the Middle East,” he told a crowd last year, exaggerating slightly. “You know what we have for it? Nothing. Nothing.”

To right this perceived wrong, Mr Trump has long favoured seizing Iraq’s oil. But after he hinted at the idea with the Iraqi prime minister (who demurred), his aides admonished him. “We can’t do this and you shouldn’t talk about it,” said H.R. McMaster, the national security adviser at the time, according to reports. Still, Mr Trump may be getting what he wants from Iraq in other ways.

When America reimposed sanctions on Iran last year it gave some countries extra time to stop buying Iranian oil before they would lose access to the American market. Most were given 90-day exemptions. In November Iraq, which shares a long border with Iran, was given half that time to cut off electricity and gas imports.

As it negotiated for extensions, American companies made a push for Iraqi contracts. In December, Rick Perry, the energy secretary, led America’s largest trade delegation to Iraq in over a decade. “It was a quid pro quo,” says an oilman. “You give us priority and we’ll give you an exemption.”

Read the full article here (subscription needed).

By John Lee.

Gas exports from Iran to Iraq have reportedly been interrupted as authorities in Iran repair pipeline damage caused during a recent earthquake.

The gas is used for electricity generation, with the cut reducing available power by 2,500 megawatts (MW).

Supplies are expected to be restored over the coming days.

(Sources: Iraq Oil Report, Reuters)

(Picture: Iran-Iraq gas pipeline during construction. Picture credit: Shana)

By John Lee.

General Electric (GE), Standard Chartered Bank and the state-run Trade Bank of Iraq (TBI) are reported to have jointly closed a $600-million financing agreement to fund the ambitious electricity project ‘Power Up Plan’ in Iraq.

According to Trade Arabia, the project will be implemented in two phases, providing more than 2 gigawatts (GW) of new power, and ensuring continuity of supply of up to 6.7 GW to Iraq’s grid.

The financing arrangement is said to be the largest bespoke Letter of Credit (LC) confirmation and discounting transaction of its kind in the region.

(Source: Trade Arabia)

By John Lee.

ABB is reportedly targeting 2024 for the completion of energy projects in Iraq.

Its managing director for the Middle East, Mostafa Al Guezeri, told The National that the Swiss-Swedish company is in the planning stage for its $1.2-billion work in the country.

He added that the company was committed to spending more on Iraq by helping the country access finance, saying “Iraq is one of the most important countries for us.

(Source: The National)

By John Lee.

South Korea’s STX Marine Service has reportedly won a contract to restore and operate diesel-fueled electric power plants in Iraq.

According to Yonhap, the company said the US$500-million deal will see it four 900-megawatt electricity generation units over five years.

It calls for 100 South Korean engineers to be dispatched by STX, along with the hiring of 500 local workers.

The company said work started on 1st July.

(Source: Yonhap)

By John Lee.

South Korea’s STX Marine Service has reportedly won a contract to restore and operate diesel-fueled electric power plants in Iraq.

According to Yonhap, the company said the US$500-million deal will see it four 900-megawatt electricity generation units over five years.

It calls for 100 South Korean engineers to be dispatched by STX, along with the hiring of 500 local workers.

The company said work started on 1st July.

(Source: Yonhap)

By John Lee.

Both Germany’s Siemens and US-based GE have signed deals with the Iraqi government on Sunday to provide major additional power generating capacity to Iraq.

Following a hotly-contested competition, the two rivals are to share the work, with GE supplying 14 Gigawatts (GW), and Siemens 11 GW.

(Sources: GE, Siemens)

GE (NYSE: GE) signed Principles of Cooperation (POC) with the Iraqi Ministry of Electricity to develop the country’s power sector.

The plan is expected to generate up to 14 gigawatts (GW) of power, create up to 65,000 direct and indirect jobs, support the government to realize savings and recoverable losses of up to $3 billion per year, establish a local technology center and support water and healthcare access.

The POC was signed by Minister Qasim Al Fahdawi, Iraq’s Minister of Electricity, and Joseph Anis, President & CEO of GE’s Power Services in Africa, South Asia and the Middle East. The comprehensive plan builds on GE’s legacy of continuous presence and commitment to bring progress to the people of Iraq over the past 50 years, and is comprised of the following key tenets:

  1. Supporting the path to energy security with 14 GW. As an immediate priority, GE will deploy proven fast power technologies and undertake upgrades at existing power plant sites to bring approximately 1.5 GW of additional power online by 2019 – the equivalent electricity needed to supply up to 1.5 million Iraqi homes, as well as undertake maintenance and rehabilitation services to secure the availability of another 7 GW that are currently operating. In addition, the agreement includes upgrades and services for existing power plants; the conversion of simple cycle power plants to combined cycle, which can help bring new power online without consuming additional fuel or releasing further emissions; as well as the establishment of new power plants with efficient, reliable power generation technology. Furthermore, GE will develop substations and overhead lines across the country, and a centralized energy management system covering generation, transmission and distribution. These initiatives will add up to 14 GW of power and strengthen grid connectivity.
  2. Realizing $3 billion in savings and recoverable losses annually. Overall, GE’s activities will help the Government realize savings and recover losses of up to $3 billion per year. Repairs, maintenance, upgrades and other services will help to reduce the operating costs of existing power plants. To further improve the transmission and distribution of power, GE will undertake comprehensive decongestion network studies, as well as advisory services to reduce collection recoverable losses. In addition, GE is offering its unique solution for integrating the capture of flared gas and power generation using GE’s advanced Gas to Power technologies. In July, Baker Hughes, a GE company signed a contract with the Iraqi Ministry  of Oil for a modular natural gas plant solution for flared gas recovery in the Nassiriya and Al Gharraf oilfields.

GE will assist the Government of Iraq to unlock financing for these projects through its extensive relationships with Global Export Credit Agencies and financial institutions.

As part of the proposals included in the POC, as well as GE’s commitment to a shared future and the progress of the Iraqi people, the company also expects to:

  1. Build local capabilities. GE plans to establish a local Technology Center comprising of a Repairs Center, a Monitoring & Diagnostics Center and a Training Center.
  2. Contribute towards providing critical services to local communities. GE intends to supply three trailer-mounted mobile water treatment units to help deliver drinking water to contribute to the everyday needs of the people of Basra. The company also plans to provide neonatal intensive care equipment and advanced medical care training for nursing staff at a neonatal intensive care center to meet the need for specialized healthcare services.

Mussab Almudaris, official spokesperson of the Iraqi Ministry of Electricity, said, “Our focus is on rebuilding Iraq to provide stable, sustainable development for our people, and developing the electricity sector is a critical component of these efforts. GE’s action plan is an ideal fit for our needs, offering a holistic package that brings industry-leading technologies, financing and social services to meet our most critical immediate and long-term needs.”

Russell Stokes, President & CEO of GE Power said, “Our presence in Iraq is based on a history of trust, partnership and success that spans over 50 years. We are honored to support the government’s focus on rebuilding Iraq, and we are proud of our legacy of delivering power where needed in the country. We understand how important it is to deliver power immediately and our holistic action plan brings together advanced solutions, financing, local investments, trainings and social services that are expected to benefit families, businesses and industries across Iraq.”

GE employs up to 300 people in Iraq and has three offices in the country – in Baghdad, Basra and Erbil. Today, GE and its partner CFMI power more than 90 percent of the aircrafts operated by Iraqi Airways, the company’s technologies contribute up to 55 percent of the current electricity production in Iraq and nearly 4,000 GE Healthcare products are deployed in hospitals and clinics across the country.

(Source: GE)