By John Lee.

The Iraqi Cabinet held its regular meeting in Baghdad on Tuesday under the chairmanship of Prime Minister Adil Abd Al-Mahdi.

The Cabinet discussed and reviewed a number of infrastructure projects, and approved a scheme to develop land close to Baghdad International Airport.

(Source: Govt of Iraq)

The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) is rehabilitating 15,000 houses in West Mosul, bringing the total number of houses in its stabilization portfolio to more than 30,000 – the largest of its kind in Iraq.

The project in West Mosul covers 29 neighbourhoods that were hardest hit during the fight to liberate the city from the Islamic State, including the Old City where the militants declared their caliphate. It will enable 90,000 people to return home.

“This rehabilitation project is a critical step for families wanting to settle back into their homes in Mosul after three years of turmoil and hardship,” says Head of UNDP’s Stabilization programme, Dr. Mohammed siddig Mudawi.

“We know it works. Through our successful projects in Ramadi and Fallujah, as well as Bartella and Bashiqa in the Ninewa Plains, we’ve witnessed first-hand the transformative impact that our housing rehabilitation work has had on communities,” he adds.

Priority for housing is given to the most vulnerable – female-headed households, households run by a minor, people living with a disability, and households where the breadwinner has not had employment in the last three years.

Essential elements such as rebuilding and plastering walls, securing windows and doors, undertaking electrical work and restoring sanitation are incorporated into the rehabilitation, plus additional items for people living with a disability, such as ramps and seated toilets.

Neighbourhoods were selected in consultation with the provincial government and Mayor’s office based on numbers of returnees and level of damage sustained. All housing repairs are agreed to by the homeowner and the local Muktar prior to commencement, and work is monitored by government-appointed committees.

Rehabilitation of the first group of houses will be complete by end of March. The entire project is scheduled to be completed by November 2019.

Approximately 800 stabilization projects have been completed or are underway by UNDP in Mosul, including restoring water and electricity networks, rebuilding educational institutions and healthcare facilities, and providing employment for locals to clear rubble from streets.

Photos of the West Mosul housing project are available here to download. Contact Fay Daoud on the details below if you would like to use any photos.

(Source: UNDP)

The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) is rehabilitating 15,000 houses in West Mosul, bringing the total number of houses in its stabilization portfolio to more than 30,000 – the largest of its kind in Iraq.

The project in West Mosul covers 29 neighbourhoods that were hardest hit during the fight to liberate the city from the Islamic State, including the Old City where the militants declared their caliphate. It will enable 90,000 people to return home.

“This rehabilitation project is a critical step for families wanting to settle back into their homes in Mosul after three years of turmoil and hardship,” says Head of UNDP’s Stabilization programme, Dr. Mohammed siddig Mudawi.

“We know it works. Through our successful projects in Ramadi and Fallujah, as well as Bartella and Bashiqa in the Ninewa Plains, we’ve witnessed first-hand the transformative impact that our housing rehabilitation work has had on communities,” he adds.

Priority for housing is given to the most vulnerable – female-headed households, households run by a minor, people living with a disability, and households where the breadwinner has not had employment in the last three years.

Essential elements such as rebuilding and plastering walls, securing windows and doors, undertaking electrical work and restoring sanitation are incorporated into the rehabilitation, plus additional items for people living with a disability, such as ramps and seated toilets.

Neighbourhoods were selected in consultation with the provincial government and Mayor’s office based on numbers of returnees and level of damage sustained. All housing repairs are agreed to by the homeowner and the local Muktar prior to commencement, and work is monitored by government-appointed committees.

Rehabilitation of the first group of houses will be complete by end of March. The entire project is scheduled to be completed by November 2019.

Approximately 800 stabilization projects have been completed or are underway by UNDP in Mosul, including restoring water and electricity networks, rebuilding educational institutions and healthcare facilities, and providing employment for locals to clear rubble from streets.

Photos of the West Mosul housing project are available here to download. Contact Fay Daoud on the details below if you would like to use any photos.

(Source: UNDP)

Iraq will ask foreign oil companies operating in the country to build housing for Iraqis employed on their projects, the oil ministry in Baghdad said in a statement on January 10.

Oil Minister Jabar al-Luaibi “issued a general notice which commits contracted companies to build modern housing compounds and provide essential services to employees,” the statement said.

(Source: GardaWorld)

By Wassim Bassem for Al-Monitor. Any opinions expressed are those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Since the fall of Saddam Hussein’s regime following the US-led invasion of Iraq in 2003, there have been hundreds of failed and delayed construction and development projects in the country.

A few months after it was built, the wall of the Imam Al-Hadi elementary school in Husseiniya, in northern Baghdad, collapsed on the night of Feb. 27; in November 2014, the local government in Babil withdrew the al-Tahmaziya street pavement project in southern Hilla from the contracting firm due to delays in the project’s implementation; and the local government of Dhi Qar province, 375 kilometers (217.5 miles) south of Baghdad, took away the licenses of 50 companies to delay the implementation of projects.

Despite the state’s budgets reaching record figures, as oil prices were close to $100 a barrel, these projects were not accomplished. Minister of Oil Adel Abdul Mahdi said Aug. 17 that Iraq’s budget between 2003 and 2015 reached $850 billion.

However, today and in light of the 50% decrease in oil prices, the implementation of these projects has become difficult, if not impossible.

On the reasons behind the negligence, Kahtan al-Sultani, head of the senior engineers at the Iraqi Ministry of Municipalities and Public Works, told Al-Monitor, “The main causes of failure [to implement projects] are reflected in the poor quality of the completed projects, and noncompletion of others. This is because the projects were given to companies based on official contracts, knowing these companies are not up to the standards required and are run by contractors connected to corrupt officials and politicians.”

This article was originally published by Niqash. Any opinions expressed are those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

A Committee For Reconstruction – The Cure For Iraq’s Economic Woes?

Thanks to security problems, political bickering and a lack of vision, there are thousands of development and construction projects on hold in Iraq. Now local economists and investors are calling for the formation of an independent Committee for Reconstruction staffed by experts, to save the country.

Iraq has been suffering from unclear economic planning for over a decade now. As a result, it is only smaller, private projects that ever seem to be completed. Large, strategic, government-funded projects are either never started or never finished.

Additionally corruption, security issues and political infighting have all led to a delay in the Iraqi Parliament approving the annual federal budget. In turn this has led to delays in all of the projects that the Iraqi government would normally be funding. According to the Iraqi government figures, the 2014 budget would be coming in at around US$140 billion.

Which is why many investors, economists and business people in Iraq have come up with a new idea to kick start the Iraqi economy. Many are saying they want to see the formation of an independent Committee for Reconstruction, a body which would be tasked with creating and implementing development projects.

Part of the reason they are enthusiastic about this idea is that it has been used successfully in Iraq before. In the 1950s, when Iraq was ruled by a monarchy established by British colonisers, there was a similar committee. The Iraqi Development Board completed major projects around the country, some of which still benefit the population today.

One example is the Thar Thar reservoir which both stores water and diverts flooding from Baghdad.

Independent) of … Khalil said Heidari-Director General of the customs service in the province of Western Iran on تصدیر ایلام goods بقیمه 265 $ for the media to Iraq for the prevention and elimination of the Mehran crossing since بدایه…

Housing and industry lead the projects market in Iraqi Kurdistan In 2011, the amount of capital invested in licensed projects was $3.1bn, according to the Kurdistan Board of Investment, part of the Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG). The next year, it…

Deputy Prime Minister for Energy Affairs Hussein Al-Shahristani calls into other companies specialized in the areas of housing construction, oil and gas, electricity and industry to Iraq undefined Baghdad/Obelisk: Deputy Prime Minister for Energy Affairs Hussein Al-Shahristani, the Iraqi Government is ready to remove the obstacles facing the British companies in Iraq, calling on other […]