The Iraqi dinar exchange globally on Tuesday
7/10/2018

Knozemedia – Foreign Currencies

– USD 1 USD = 1,190.0000 Iraqi Dinar

1 Iraqi Dinar = 0.0008 USD

– Euro 1 Euro = 1,397.8293 Iraqi Dinar

1 Iraqi Dinar = 0.0007 Euro

– Pound sterling = £ 1,576.7792 Iraqi dinars

1 Iraqi Dinar = 0.0006 £

– Canadian Dollar 1 Canadian Dollar = 907.2750 Iraqi Dinar

Iraqi Dinar = 0.0011 Canadian Dollars

Australian Dollar 1 Australian Dollar = 888.1127 Iraqi Dinar

1 Iraqi Dinar = 0.0011 Australian Dollars

– Japanese Yen = JPY = 10.7364 Iraqi Dinar

Iraqi Dinar =

Swiss Franc 1 Swiss Franc = 1,199.5968 Iraqi Dinars

1 Iraqi Dinar = 0.0008 Swiss Franc

Turkish Lira 1 Turkish Lira = 254.0200 Iraqi Dinar

Iraqi Dinar = 0.0039 Turkish Lira

– Chinese Yuan 1 Chinese Yuan = 179.7732 Iraqi Dinars

1 IQD = 0.0056 Chinese Yuan

– Thai Baht 1 Thai Baht = 35.9739 Iraqi Dinars

1 Iraqi Dinar = 0.0278 Thai Baht

– Ringit Malaysia 1 Ringit Malaysia = 295.3220 Iraqi Dinar

Ringtone Malaysia

– Indian Rupee 1 Indian Rupee = 17,330 Iraqi Dinars

Indian Rupee

The Iranian Rial 1 Iranian Rial = 0.0277 Iraqi Dinar

1 Iraqi dinar = 36.0716 Iranian riyal

Arab currencies

Egyptian Pound. Egyptian Pound

1 Iraqi Dinar = 0.0151 Egyptian Pounds

Saudi Riyal 1 Saudi Riyal = 316,1992 Iraqi Dinars

1 Iraqi Dinar = 0.0032 SAR

– The UAE Dirham (AED) = 323.9700 Iraqi Dinar

1 ID = 0.0031 AED

– Sudanese Pound 1 Sudanese Pound = 66.1111 Iraqi Dinars

Iraqi Dinar = 0.0151 Sudanese pounds

– The Algerian Dinar 1 Algerian Dinar = 10.1435 Iraqi Dinar

1 Iraqi Dinar = 0.0986 Algerian Dinars

– Bahraini Dinar = BD 3,134,6971

1 Iraqi Dinars = BD 0.0003

– Jordanian Dinar 1 JD = 1,676,0351 Iraqi Dinars

Iraqi Dinar = 0.0006 JD

– Kuwaiti Dinar = KD 3,934,3525

IQD = KD 0.0003

Lebanese Pound = LBP = 0.7851 Iraqi Dinar

1 Iraqi Dinar = LBP 1.2737

– Libyan Dinar 1 Libyan Dinar = 868.6131 Iraqi Dinar

1 Iraqi Dinars = 0.0012 Libyan Dinars

– Moroccan Dirham 1 Moroccan Dirham = 126.1194 Iraqi Dinars

1 Iraqi Dinar = 0.0079 Moroccan Dirham

Mauritanian Ouguiya 1 Mauritanian ouguiya = 3.3474 Iraqi Dinar

1 Iraqi Dinar = 0.2987 Mauritanian ouguiya

Syrian Pound 1 Syrian Pound = 2.3107 Iraqi Dinar

1 Iraqi Dinar = 0.4328 Syrian Pounds

Somali Shilling 1 Somali Shilling = 2.0570 Iraqi Dinar

Somali Shillings

Omani Rials Omani Rial = 3,090,6281 Iraqi Dinars

1 Iraqi Dinars = RO 0.0003

Qatari Riyal 1 Qatari Riyal = 326.8333 Iraqi Dinars

1 IQD = 0.0031 QAR

– The Tunisian Dinar 1 Tunisian Dinar = 455.3630 Iraqi Dinar

Iraqi Dinar = 0.0022 Tunisian Dinars

– Yemeni Riyal 1 Yemeni Riyal = 4.7534 Iraqi Dinars

Iraqi Dinar = 0.2104 Yemeni Riyals

– Djibouti Franc 1 Djibouti Franc = 6.6835 Iraqi Dinars

1 Iraqi Dinar = 0.1496 Djibouti Franc

http://www.knoozmedia.com/352775/%D8…-%D8%A7%D9%84/

Is the world about a war of currencies or war started ?!
7/11/2018

What was being put in narrow circles a few months ago is now a question that is expanding day after day. Is the world heading for a currency war? Or is the currency war already under way, and can the Sino-US trade conflict be a prelude to a massive economic downturn that drives both sides to take a qualitative step to win the battle by turning to currency war? And who is the biggest loser in that war if it breaks out?



Currency war is the password now in many economic corridors, and it is not a matter of examining the extent of its seriousness or economic impact, such topics have killed academic research, but that the international economy suffered catastrophic effects in some stages of development, and therefore humanity has painful experiences with That kind of war, and what is currently being seen, is limited to how the global economy can face the risks of that battle.

Can the bipolar leaders of the United States and China realize the fate of the international economy if they decide to go ahead with currency war, Which may mean that Khaya Is economic suicide the official choice?

Professor John White, former chairman of the Bank of England’s Advisory Committee, puts the question to the question: Does anyone have an interest in the value of the currency being high in the current global trade conflict? The question is answered by "no".

"It can not be said that the international economy is witnessing a war of currencies, but certainly the circumstances are more than ever prepared for that war," he says. "If you are pessimistic, I can say that we are moving in this direction.
"The big economies now have a strong currency, after the strong currency has been a sign of strong economy and improved performance, and the conviction now prevailing among many economic leaders and policymakers that a weak currency will boost economic growth gives the economy a preferential advantage On his trade rivals, the risk that if everyone joined to that conviction will be all losers. "

The US administration wants the dollar to be weak, the EU is also seeking a weak European currency, and Japan is not hiding its official policy to overcome deflation lies in weakening the yen, China wants the yuan More competitive to increase exports and reduce imports, and Britain is silent on the decline of sterling, which could contribute to increase exports at a time when the exit from the European Union many economic problems.

But what’s the problem with that? Answers d. David, the Bank of England economist, said: "There is no problem in devaluation per se if it is a result of changes in market forces, but the risk when it is deliberate or flawed is done deliberately."

He asserts to the "economic" that the US side was clear and frank in accusing China strongly and frankly, as well as Japan to a lesser degree, that they manipulate the value of their local currency, the yuan and yen to achieve preferential advantages at the expense of US exports.

He notes that US Treasury Secretary Stephen Manuchen welcomed the depreciation of the dollar while welcoming the best economic performance of the euro area in more than a decade. Not surprisingly, the euro against the dollar rose to more than $ 1.25. On the other hand, The European is very upset by the euro’s improved value, which hampers its efforts to overcome deflation and low inflation in the Eurozone countries.

"Under the circumstances, investors and hedge funds are very cautious and delay their investment decisions pending clouds, which means a drop in growth."

Concerns that a trade war could turn into a currency war are legitimate for many economists, but they believe that currency war has not yet officially broken out.

But some believe that the US economy may be better able to counter that war than others. Some even believe that Washington may have a real interest in moving the international economy toward a currency war to curb the Chinese yuan’s ambitions.


Concerns about China’s pricing of many international goods, mainly oil in yuan, concern the top White House economic officials, congressional leaders and US financial institutions. The dollar now accounts for about 85 percent of international trade transactions, and such a step could erode the currency’s centralization.

And some believe that Washington has an interest in weakening the Chinese yuan so much that it can not be priced for major commodities in international trade, and this will only happen through its defeat in a currency war, which China is seeking to avoid now .

Since 2016, there are notable Chinese steps to dismantle capital controls on the yuan, a prerequisite for making it an international currency. Although these steps contribute relatively to the promotion of international trade by promoting the use of the yuan beyond China’s economic borders, it is a future challenge for the dollar American.

"The Chinese central bank has pledged that it will not use the yuan as a means of a trade dispute with the United States, revealing China’s financial policymakers’ understanding that they will emerge losers from the battle of currency war," said Tina Brown, a banking expert. In that war, the Chinese yuan is in a vulnerable position, and Beijing will not have to repeat the experience of 2015 by injecting more cash reserves into the markets to maintain the value of its national currency from total collapse against the dollar.

This means huge erosion in its dollar reserves without a household It is to maintain the balance of the yuan. "
But if the United States can emerge victorious in that war, despite the losses, why not rush to ignite the currency war ?!

The current interplay in the global economy as a result of globalization largely hampers the ability of the United States to do so. Such a war will inevitably weaken the growth rates of the Chinese economy and weaken the import intensity of China from the United States. Means that the US economy is negatively affected by the decline of his opponent.

Investment expert Boris William said the United States would accept a relative devaluation of the yuan as a means of providing some support for the Chinese economy. But if Beijing’s financial authorities ignore US warnings that the yuan should not retreat from a certain level, the sensitive level is 6.7 yuan against the dollar The US strategy will change.

"The fear that the continued devaluation of the Chinese currency against the dollar will lead to a currency war is because each country will have a different reading of the reasons for this decline. While China will view it as a justifiable move, Given the conditions in the Chinese economy.

He explains that the other side, the administration of President Trump, will look at China’s position as a plan aimed at harming the US share of world trade. If the two sides engage in a currency war, the other economies will certainly suffer greatly.

He notes that a number of advanced industrial countries such as Japan, the European Central Bank and the Bank of England have used the logic of weakening their currency more money printing to encourage exports, so why deprive China of the practice?

https://www.albawaba.com/ar/%D8%A3%D8%B9%D9%85%D8%A7%D9%84/%D9%87%D9%84-%D8%A7%D9%84%D8%B9%D8%A7%D9%84%D9%85-%D9%86%D8%AD%D9%88-%D8%AD%D8%B1%D8%A8-%D8%B9%D9%85%D9%84%D8%A7%D8%AA-%D8%A3%D9%85-%D8%A7%D9%84%D8%AD%D8%B1%D8%A8-%D8%A8%D8%AF%D8%A3%D8%AA-1157616

Why is it difficult to replace dollar trading in any other global currency?

4/30/2018

Sabah al-Hashemi
Many citizens wonder about the possibility of replacing the dollar in monetary transactions and "Is it possible to dispense with the green card in the global monetary system?" Global reports and expert opinions indicate that it is difficult to replace the dollar in any other currency because this would create imbalances In the global currency market as well as 85 percent of world trade based on the dollar, as well as issuing 39 percent of global debt using the US currency.

For several years, the US dollar is the strongest currency in the world, and is officially approved by the central banks in their cash reserves, along with the gold metal finally denominated in dollars.

The green paper’s acquisition of that position for years without a real competitor made it difficult to have a strong alternative, although the US dollar reserves fell to a four-year low in the fourth quarter of last year.

The academic economist d. Issam Mohammed described in an earlier statement to "Sabah" linking Iraqi foreign trade to the dollar as a matter of benefit to the economy and achieve stability as it is consistent with the global trend in general.

And "the difficulty of replacing foreign trade in another currency because it will create imbalance in the global currency market in terms of increased demand for a particular currency without others."

"The dollar culture of the region in general makes it difficult to deal with the euro rather than the dollar," said Abdel-Zahra Mohammed, an economist.

"Among these reasons is that the US currency is global and long-standing and has been dealt with for a long time, which highlights the dominance of the dollar on the rest of the other currencies, such as euros, for example, although it is a recognized global currency, but it is a modern currency."

How does the dollar prevail?

The dependence on the dollar does not come as the main reserve currency in the countries of the world due to the status of the American economy of the global economy, because in this perspective the US currency will lose in competition; because since the Second World War, the US share in global GDP declined from About 30 percent to 18 percent, surpassing China’s share by only 2 percent, and the share of emerging markets in global GDP rose from 40 to 60 percent.

Despite all that, the global financial policy has not changed in line with these developments and the dollar has maintained its status because of Bretton Woods. Bretton Woods and Bretton Woods is a historic agreement on cash exchange rate management, and the name of the agreement was attributed to the place where it was held in 1944, whereby the US dollar became the currency of the world’s cash reserve and linked to the price of gold.

Under the agreement, central banks will maintain fixed exchange rates between their currencies and the dollar, while the US will replace the US dollar with gold on demand.

The system continued until August 15, 1971, when US President Richard Nixon declared a halt to the replacement of the dollar with gold, the most important element of the Bretton Woods system.

Then, in 1973, foreign governments allowed the currency to float, putting an end to the Bretton Woods system.

Until the 1970s, about two-thirds of world GDP was based on the dollar, and the rest was largely divided between the British pound and the Soviet ruble.

The reason for the dollar’s strength

Several reasons have led the dollar to remain on the list of the most powerful currency of the year, apart from the size and strength of the US economy, including that more than a third of the world’s GDP comes from countries that link their currencies to the green card.

In the foreign exchange market more than 85 percent of that trade is based on the dollar, and 39 percent of the world’s debt is issued using the US currency.

Iqbal countries to keep the dollar in their reserves and acquisition of the first place in this regard, evidence of the strength of the US currency, as well as its use in international transactions.

Most of the world commodity contracts are denominated in US dollars, especially oil and gold, which are the most important global commodities, making the transactions of these commodities using green paper.

The US currency has always been able to overcome its pitfalls during the 1970s and 1980s, and from 1991 to 1993.

Although everyone was betting on the collapse of the dollar, many governments thought to end the peg in the US currency, Stronger than the first. Are there competitors? In March 2009, China and Russia called for a new global currency that would become the currency of the world’s reserve currency, independent and non-volatile, as well as removing the shortcomings resulting from the use of national currencies linked to credit.

China has already called on the International Monetary Fund (IMF) to do so as a result of concerns that its trillions in US currency will become less valuable as a result of the US spending deficit and the issuance of US Treasury bonds to support debt.

Some countries have also tended to keep currencies other than the dollar in their cash reserves, with yen holding in state reserves rising to the highest level since 2002 at 4.89 percent in the fourth quarter of last year.

The Chinese yuan was also included in the reserve currencies of the countries in the fourth quarter of 2016, and the total holdings of countries from the Chinese currency to 1.23 percent in the fourth quarter of 2017, compared to 1.12 percent in the previous quarter.

As the yuan entered the IMF’s Special Drawing Rights (SDR) currencies, many said it could replace the dollar as the world’s top currency, but the fact that it has been less frequent in Chinese trade and rules on exchange has played down that belief.

The Central Bank of China rules to set a reference rate for the yuan daily and only allows a margin of rise or fall of 2 percent of this level.

http://www.alsabaah.iq/ArticleShow.aspx?ID=156384