By Adnan Abu Zeed for Al Monitor. Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Hussein Shaalan feels nostalgic for the 1990s, when international sanctions against Iraq following the country’s annexation of Kuwait made his pottery business soar.

“The 1990s were the last years when this craft was prosperous because imports [which competed with local products] were rare,” the 60-year-old potter from Hillah city in Babil governorate told Al-Monitor.

Today, Shaalan can no longer rely on pottery to make a living as he has done the last 35 years. Industrial development and imported goods now offer people plastic and metal alternatives to the clay pots that Iraqis traditionally used as table and kitchenware.

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From AFP. Any opinions expressed are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Iraq’s ancient pottery culture in the holy city of Najaf is dying out with the increasing demand for more modern products.

Iraqis, who traditionally used clay utensils for storing food and cooking are turning to cheaper plastic products made either elsewhere in Iraq or imported.

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