Cabinet approves measures to expedite completion of investment projects

The Cabinet held its regular weekly meeting in Baghdad on Tuesday under the chairmanship of Prime Minister Adil Abd Al-Mahdi.

The Prime Minister briefed the Cabinet on national developments, and underscored that, during this period, ministries and other state institutions will continue to discharge their day-to-day duties and serve citizens.

The Cabinet:

  • discussed recommendations submitted by the Ministerial Economic Council on halting, until further notice, the imports of agricultural produce in which Iraq is self-sufficient.
  • agreed measures to expedite the completion of investment projects across Iraq, and approved a number of exemptions from applicable regulations to enable ministries, public bodies and local authorities to avoid delays to projects.
  • accepted the recommendation of the Ministerial Energy Council and authorised the Ministry of Electricity to sign an amendment to the original contract with China Machinery Engineering Company (CMEC) to complete the 2X630MW Thermal Power Plant Project in Salahuddin Province, and instructed the Ministry of Finance to support the implementation of this project.
  • issued instructions and guidance on the installation of CCTV cameras in commercial outlets, malls, shops, and other facilities.

(Source: Iraqi Govt)

By Adnan Abu Zeed for Al Monitor. Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Iraqi Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi announced Nov. 29 that he would officially submit his resignation to parliament, in the first government response to the wide public protests that have been sweeping through Iraq for two months.

Former judge and legal expert Ali al-Tamimi explained to Al-Monitor the legal and constitutional steps that will follow Abdul Mahdi’s resignation announcement.

“The president accepts the resignation under Article 18 of the Cabinet system, which considers the whole government resigned with all its ministers,” he said.

Click here to read the full article.

By Adnan Abu Zeed for Al Monitor. Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Iraqi Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi announced Nov. 29 that he would officially submit his resignation to parliament, in the first government response to the wide public protests that have been sweeping through Iraq for two months.

Former judge and legal expert Ali al-Tamimi explained to Al-Monitor the legal and constitutional steps that will follow Abdul Mahdi’s resignation announcement.

“The president accepts the resignation under Article 18 of the Cabinet system, which considers the whole government resigned with all its ministers,” he said.

Click here to read the full article.

From Al Jazeera. Any opinions expressed are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Adel Abdul Mahdi became prime minister in October 2018, at a time of unrest in the country.

His government promised to make things better, but said it needed more time but was unsuccessful.

Now, Iraqi politics moves into uncharted territory.

Al Jazeera‘s Katia Lopez-Hodoyan reports:

dBy John Lee.

Iraq’s parliament has reportedly approved the resignation of Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi.

According to BBC News, it is unclear who will take over from Mr Abdul Mahdi, as existing laws do not specify how parliament should deal with a prime minister’s resignation.

On Sunday clashes continued in cities including Baghdad and Najaf.

(Source: BBC News)

By Abbas Kadhim, for the Atlantic Council.

The challenges Iraq faces after prime minister’s resignation

The news on November 29 that Iraqi Prime Minister Adil Abdul-Mahdi will resign is unprecedented in post-2003 Iraq.

Many questions must be answered before his successor is appointed, and in the meantime, we can expect unrest to continue.

The immediate concern will be constitutional.

The Iraqi constitution addresses the replacement of a prime minister following his removal from office by a parliamentary vote of no-confidence and in the case of vacancy for any reason, but it is silent on resignation, other than a scenario related to the dissolution of parliament and the calling of a new election.

The full article can be viewed here.

(Source: Atlantic Council)

By Abbas Kadhim, for the Atlantic Council.

The challenges Iraq faces after prime minister’s resignation

The news on November 29 that Iraqi Prime Minister Adil Abdul-Mahdi will resign is unprecedented in post-2003 Iraq.

Many questions must be answered before his successor is appointed, and in the meantime, we can expect unrest to continue.

The immediate concern will be constitutional.

The Iraqi constitution addresses the replacement of a prime minister following his removal from office by a parliamentary vote of no-confidence and in the case of vacancy for any reason, but it is silent on resignation, other than a scenario related to the dissolution of parliament and the calling of a new election.

The full article can be viewed here.

(Source: Atlantic Council)

The Iraqi Prime Minister, Adel Abdul Mahdi, announced on November 29 that he is to submit his resignation to Parliament in the wake of increasing violence across the country.

The announcement was shown on state television and came one day after at least 35 protestors were killed by the security forces. Grand Ayatollah al-Sistani’s latest sermon, in which he calls on the Iraqi Parliament to remove their support for the Cabinet, will have added untold pressure on the PM.

In his statement, Abdul Mahdi states “In response to this call, and in order to facilitate it as quickly as possible, I will present to parliament a demand (to accept) my resignation from the leadership of the current government.”

It is also reported that the PM’s Chief of Staff, Abu Jihad, has also announced his decision to stand down. Whilst there was no mention of when thePM will stand down, it is likely to be in conjunction with the sitting of Parliament on Sunday, December 01, although some people –such as several MPs aligned with the Sairoun Alliance –are calling for an emergency session to be held on November 30.

(Source: GardaWorld)

The Iraqi Prime Minister, Adel Abdul Mahdi, announced on November 29 that he is to submit his resignation to Parliament in the wake of increasing violence across the country.

The announcement was shown on state television and came one day after at least 35 protestors were killed by the security forces. Grand Ayatollah al-Sistani’s latest sermon, in which he calls on the Iraqi Parliament to remove their support for the Cabinet, will have added untold pressure on the PM.

In his statement, Abdul Mahdi states “In response to this call, and in order to facilitate it as quickly as possible, I will present to parliament a demand (to accept) my resignation from the leadership of the current government.”

It is also reported that the PM’s Chief of Staff, Abu Jihad, has also announced his decision to stand down. Whilst there was no mention of when thePM will stand down, it is likely to be in conjunction with the sitting of Parliament on Sunday, December 01, although some people –such as several MPs aligned with the Sairoun Alliance –are calling for an emergency session to be held on November 30.

(Source: GardaWorld)

The Cabinet held its regular weekly meeting in Baghdad on Tuesday under the chairmanship of Prime Minister Adil Abd Al-Mahdi and with the presence of the governors.

The Cabinet decided to grant the Minister of Oil the authority to recruit graduates of the 2018-2019 oil vocational training courses to become employees of the Ministry of Oil and its public companies.

The Cabinet agreed to reduce customs fees on plastic granules for industrial projects.

The Cabinet granted the Ministry of Labor and Social Affairs the authority to contract 1,000 researchers to ensure the timely and accurate completion of the projects and reforms decided by the Cabinet.

The Cabinet granted the National Investment Commission the power to sign the United Nations Convention on International Settlement Agreements Resulting from Mediation.

The Cabinet decided to start the first phase of the “Babylon Sewerage Project” as per the recommendations made by the Governor of Babylon and the Ministry of Construction, Housing and Municipalities’ Audit and Approval Committee, and the executive commission. The project will be implemented by KAMA.

The Cabinet approved the draft law for the Iraqi Olympic Committee and referred it to the Council of Representatives.

The Cabinet also approved the recommendation made by the Ministerial Council on Energy to implement projects on government land and properties after obtaining the initial approval from the owner and the relevant authorities and following all the necessary legal requirements.

(Source: Government of Iraq)