By John Lee.

Germany’s Siemens and Egypt’s Orascom Construction signed an agreement with Iraq’s Ministry of Electricity to rebuild Baiji 1 and Baiji 2 power plants in northern Iraq.

The plants will have a combined generation capacity of 1.6 gigawatts (GW) when completed and are a major step in Siemens’ roadmap for rebuilding Iraq’s power sector that has already added more than 700 megawatts to Iraq’s grid.

Work at Baiji, which is about 250 km north of Baghdad, will begin once the contracts are approved by Iraq’s Council of Ministers and a financial agreement is reached with the Ministry of Finance. The projects are expected to be completed within 28 months after the financial closing.

The power plants in Baiji were severely damaged by Islamic State militants. Recovering the lost capacity from the plants will help Iraq power its biggest oil refinery located in the city, a concrete plant, and will provide electricity to thousands of homes in Salahuddin province and other areas.

Iraq’s Electricity Minister Luay al-Khateeb, Siemens AG’s Joe Kaeser (pictured) and Osama Bishai, the CEO of Orascom Construction, witnessed the signing of the agreement on the sidelines of the Iraq Energy Forum 2019 in Baghdad.

Siemens will supply four new SGT5-2000E gas turbines and will inspect and revamp six exiting ones. The company will also provide two 400kV and one 132kV substations, along with generators, auxiliaries, automation and control systems, and related electrical equipment.

Dietmar Siersdorfer, CEO Siemens Middle East and UAE, said

“Iraq’s economic transformation is picking up pace, and this project demonstrates Siemens’ commitment to help Iraq’s Ministry of Electricity provide efficient and reliable power to all its people. We are proud to begin this project to help Iraqis in liberated areas recover and prosper.”

Discussing the deal, Karim Amin, CEO of Power Generation at Siemens AG, said:

The reconstruction of Baiji 1 and 2 power plants mark the second phase of our roadmap in Iraq and will be the biggest so far in terms of power generating capacity when both plants are completed.

“The rebuilding of Baiji will secure 1.6 gigawatts and will create hundreds of jobs, which is a further demonstration of Siemens’ commitment to support knowledge transfer to the Iraqi people.”

Siemens’ footprint has been expanding in Iraq and the company is now active at over 20 locations, from Basra to Erbil. Siemens also has some recent experience in Baiji.

Earlier this month, Siemens delivered power equipment to ensure constant electricity for a clinic being built in the city and will also donate Siemens medical equipment for the facility. Al-Tawheed Center is expected to open this year and will be able to treat 10,000 patients a year.

Siemens and Iraq’s Ministry of Electricity signed an implementation agreement to kick off the execution of the roadmap for rebuilding Iraq’s power sector in April 2019. Within the implementation agreement, the two agreed on the award of contracts valued at approximately €700 million for Phase 1 of the Roadmap.

(Source: Siemens)

By John Lee.

Germany’s Siemens and Egypt’s Orascom Construction signed an agreement with Iraq’s Ministry of Electricity to rebuild Baiji 1 and Baiji 2 power plants in northern Iraq.

The plants will have a combined generation capacity of 1.6 gigawatts (GW) when completed and are a major step in Siemens’ roadmap for rebuilding Iraq’s power sector that has already added more than 700 megawatts to Iraq’s grid.

Work at Baiji, which is about 250 km north of Baghdad, will begin once the contracts are approved by Iraq’s Council of Ministers and a financial agreement is reached with the Ministry of Finance. The projects are expected to be completed within 28 months after the financial closing.

The power plants in Baiji were severely damaged by Islamic State militants. Recovering the lost capacity from the plants will help Iraq power its biggest oil refinery located in the city, a concrete plant, and will provide electricity to thousands of homes in Salahuddin province and other areas.

Iraq’s Electricity Minister Luay al-Khateeb, Siemens AG’s Joe Kaeser (pictured) and Osama Bishai, the CEO of Orascom Construction, witnessed the signing of the agreement on the sidelines of the Iraq Energy Forum 2019 in Baghdad.

Siemens will supply four new SGT5-2000E gas turbines and will inspect and revamp six exiting ones. The company will also provide two 400kV and one 132kV substations, along with generators, auxiliaries, automation and control systems, and related electrical equipment.

Dietmar Siersdorfer, CEO Siemens Middle East and UAE, said

“Iraq’s economic transformation is picking up pace, and this project demonstrates Siemens’ commitment to help Iraq’s Ministry of Electricity provide efficient and reliable power to all its people. We are proud to begin this project to help Iraqis in liberated areas recover and prosper.”

Discussing the deal, Karim Amin, CEO of Power Generation at Siemens AG, said:

The reconstruction of Baiji 1 and 2 power plants mark the second phase of our roadmap in Iraq and will be the biggest so far in terms of power generating capacity when both plants are completed.

“The rebuilding of Baiji will secure 1.6 gigawatts and will create hundreds of jobs, which is a further demonstration of Siemens’ commitment to support knowledge transfer to the Iraqi people.”

Siemens’ footprint has been expanding in Iraq and the company is now active at over 20 locations, from Basra to Erbil. Siemens also has some recent experience in Baiji.

Earlier this month, Siemens delivered power equipment to ensure constant electricity for a clinic being built in the city and will also donate Siemens medical equipment for the facility. Al-Tawheed Center is expected to open this year and will be able to treat 10,000 patients a year.

Siemens and Iraq’s Ministry of Electricity signed an implementation agreement to kick off the execution of the roadmap for rebuilding Iraq’s power sector in April 2019. Within the implementation agreement, the two agreed on the award of contracts valued at approximately €700 million for Phase 1 of the Roadmap.

(Source: Siemens)

By John Lee.

Iraq’s Oil Ministry has confirmed that the Al-Sumoud refinery in Baiji is operating at capacity, following a fire in the area.

The director general of the North Refineries Company (NRC), Qassem Abdul Rahman, said the fire was near the refinery but not in it.

He pointed out that:

“The fire that broke out in the vicinity of the Sumoud refinery in Baiji because of the fall of one of the transmission lines of electricity on abandoned agricultural land near the refinery and led to the movement of wind, set fire to dry grass … The fire was outside the refinery’s perimeter and did not affect its production.”

(Source: Ministry of Oil)

(Picture: Baiji refinery)

Siemens, the Iraqi Ministry of Health and the Directorate of Health in Salah ad-Din Province have announced the completion of building repairs and the impending installation of Siemens medical equipment at the Al-Tawheed Center.

The clinic, located in Baiji, has been fully renovated by the Ministry of Health and will be equipped with Siemens technology to provide much-needed medical care to residents of the province, approximately 200km north of Baghdad.

Siemens will donate all medical and power equipment required for the Al-Tawheed Center to the German non-governmental organization Stiftung der Deutschen Lions, enabling them to complete center’s rehabilitation.

When complete, the center will have the capacity to treat up to 10,000 patients a year. The Siemens equipment includes a digital x-ray, a dental treatment center, state-of-the-art laboratory equipment including a hematology blood analyzer, a power transformer and other technical equipment required to ensure uninterrupted power supply.

Musab Alkateeb, CEO of Siemens Iraq, said:

This health clinic is an important part of our commitment to the Iraqi people, and we are pleased to be working with the Ministry of Health and local leaders to return this important facility to the community.

“Siemens has a long relationship with the city of Baiji and its people, and we understand the importance of enabling access to high-quality, reliable healthcare as we work together to build the New Iraq.

(Source: Siemens)

UK-based Aggreko (Middle East) and Iraq’s North Refineries Company have signed a contract for rental of temporary power generators to supply 15MW of power to Baiji Refinery as a first stage.

For Aggreko, the world’s largest supplier of temporary power, which also supplies South Refineries Company with 25MW,

This contract will help broaden the partnership between Aggreko, the world’s largest supplier of temporary power, and the Ministry of Oil and its affiliate companies, and is a demonstration of the collaboration between both entities.

Aggreko also supplies South Refineries Company with 25MW of power.

(Source: Eurogulf)

By John Lee.

Oil Minister Jabar Ali al-Luaibi [Allibi, Luiebi] announced on Sunday the full rehabilitation of the Salahaddin-2 unit at Baiji oil refinery.

The refinery was shut down in 2014 due to the actions of the Islamic State group (IS, ISIS, ISIL, Daesh).

The Salahaddin-2 unit has a capacity of 70,000 barrels per day (bpd).

(Source: Ministry of Oil)

By John Lee.

Iraqi Oil Minister Jabar Ali al-Luaibi [Allibi, Luiebi] (pictured) has announced that the Kirkuk-Baiji-Baghdad pipeline is now operational.

According to a statement from the Ministry, the 16-inch crude oil pipeline was completed in record time.

Running for 180 kilometers, the pipeline will supply the refineries of Baiji and Daura, and the Quds power station in the north of Baghdad, at a rate of 40,000 barrels per day (bpd).

(Source: Ministry of Oil)

By John Lee.

Iraq’s Ministry of Oil has announced that it will start rehabilitation of the Salahuddin refineries 1 and 2 in Baiji district.

Through its North Refineries Company (NOC), it has called on local and international companies to supply the equipment outlined below:

(Source: Ministry of Oil)

By John Lee.

Iraq’s Oil Ministry has announced that it will build a new pipeline from Baiji to Fishkabur, enabling Kirkuk oil to be exported again from Turkey’s Ceyhan port (pictured).

Kirkuk’s oil was previously being exported via the Kurdistan Regional Government’s (KRG) pipeline to Ceyhan, but this has been on hold since Baghdad took control of the area.

Plans to rehabilitate Baghdad’s existing oil pipeline to Turkey, which was badly damaged by militants in 2014, have been scrapped.

(Sourced: Ministry of Oil, Rudaw)