In connection with the UK Serious Fraud Office (SFO)’s ongoing investigation into Petrofac Limited and its subsidiaries (“Petrofac”), on 6 February 2019 David Lufkin, 51, a British national, and previously Global Head of Sales for Petrofac International Limited, pleaded guilty at Westminster Magistrates’ Court to eleven counts of bribery, contrary to sections 1(1) and 1(2) of the Bribery Act 2010.

These offences relate to the making of corrupt offers to influence the award of contracts to Petrofac worth in excess of USD $730 million in Iraq and in excess of USD $3.5 billion in Saudi Arabia.

The charges included the following:

Payments of approximately USD $2.2 million were ultimately made by Petrofac to two agents in respect of a USD $329.7 million Engineering, Procurement and Construction (“EPC”) contract on the Badra oilfield in Iraq (the “Badra Phase One EPC contract”) awarded to Petrofac in February 2012.

Corrupt offers of payments were also made to an agent to influence the award of contract variations to the Badra Phase One EPC contract, and for the extension of the Badra Operations and Maintenance (“O&M”) contract.  Petrofac was unsuccessful in obtaining these contracts and no payments were made to the agent.

  • Fao [Faw] Terminal, Iraq

Payments of approximately USD $4 million were ultimately made by Petrofac to an agent in respect of an O&M contract on the Fao Terminal project in Iraq (the “Fao Terminal O&M contract”).  The Fao Terminal O&M contract, awarded to Petrofac in August 2012, together with yearly extensions awarded in 2013, 2014 and 2015, was worth approximately USD $400 million to Petrofac.

  • Saudi Arabia

Payments of approximately USD $45 million were made by Petrofac to its agent in respect of the following contracts awarded to Petrofac in Saudi Arabia, between July 2012 and November 2015:

  • Payments of approximately USD $5.8 million were ultimately made by Petrofac to its agent in respect of EPC contracts for the Petro Rabigh Phase II Petrochemical Expansion Project awarded in July 2012 and worth approximately USD $463 million;
  • Payments of approximately USD $21.4 million were ultimately made by Petrofac to its agent in respect of EPC contracts for Jazan Refinery and Terminal Project awarded in December 2012 and worth approximately USD $1.7 billion; and
  • Payments of approximately USD $19.5 million were ultimately made by Petrofac to its agent in respect of the EPC contract for a sulphur recovery plant as part of the Fadhili Gas Plant Project awarded in November 2015 and worth approximately USD $1.56 billion.

Corrupt offers of payments were also made to its agent for the award of other contracts at the time. Petrofac was unsuccessful in obtaining these contracts and no payments were made to its agent.

David Lufkin will be sentenced at a later date.

The SFO’s investigation into Petrofac’s use of agents in multiple jurisdictions, including Iraq and Saudi Arabia, is ongoing.

Individuals with information potentially relevant to this investigation are encouraged to contact the SFO through our secure and confidential reporting channelWhen providing information please quote ‘Petrofac Investigation’.  Please note that it would be of particular assistance if you could provide your contact details for any further queries or questions that we may have.

(Source: UK SFO)

In connection with the UK Serious Fraud Office (SFO)’s ongoing investigation into Petrofac Limited and its subsidiaries (“Petrofac”), on 6 February 2019 David Lufkin, 51, a British national, and previously Global Head of Sales for Petrofac International Limited, pleaded guilty at Westminster Magistrates’ Court to eleven counts of bribery, contrary to sections 1(1) and 1(2) of the Bribery Act 2010.

These offences relate to the making of corrupt offers to influence the award of contracts to Petrofac worth in excess of USD $730 million in Iraq and in excess of USD $3.5 billion in Saudi Arabia.

The charges included the following:

Payments of approximately USD $2.2 million were ultimately made by Petrofac to two agents in respect of a USD $329.7 million Engineering, Procurement and Construction (“EPC”) contract on the Badra oilfield in Iraq (the “Badra Phase One EPC contract”) awarded to Petrofac in February 2012.

Corrupt offers of payments were also made to an agent to influence the award of contract variations to the Badra Phase One EPC contract, and for the extension of the Badra Operations and Maintenance (“O&M”) contract.  Petrofac was unsuccessful in obtaining these contracts and no payments were made to the agent.

  • Fao [Faw] Terminal, Iraq

Payments of approximately USD $4 million were ultimately made by Petrofac to an agent in respect of an O&M contract on the Fao Terminal project in Iraq (the “Fao Terminal O&M contract”).  The Fao Terminal O&M contract, awarded to Petrofac in August 2012, together with yearly extensions awarded in 2013, 2014 and 2015, was worth approximately USD $400 million to Petrofac.

  • Saudi Arabia

Payments of approximately USD $45 million were made by Petrofac to its agent in respect of the following contracts awarded to Petrofac in Saudi Arabia, between July 2012 and November 2015:

  • Payments of approximately USD $5.8 million were ultimately made by Petrofac to its agent in respect of EPC contracts for the Petro Rabigh Phase II Petrochemical Expansion Project awarded in July 2012 and worth approximately USD $463 million;
  • Payments of approximately USD $21.4 million were ultimately made by Petrofac to its agent in respect of EPC contracts for Jazan Refinery and Terminal Project awarded in December 2012 and worth approximately USD $1.7 billion; and
  • Payments of approximately USD $19.5 million were ultimately made by Petrofac to its agent in respect of the EPC contract for a sulphur recovery plant as part of the Fadhili Gas Plant Project awarded in November 2015 and worth approximately USD $1.56 billion.

Corrupt offers of payments were also made to its agent for the award of other contracts at the time. Petrofac was unsuccessful in obtaining these contracts and no payments were made to its agent.

David Lufkin will be sentenced at a later date.

The SFO’s investigation into Petrofac’s use of agents in multiple jurisdictions, including Iraq and Saudi Arabia, is ongoing.

Individuals with information potentially relevant to this investigation are encouraged to contact the SFO through our secure and confidential reporting channelWhen providing information please quote ‘Petrofac Investigation’.  Please note that it would be of particular assistance if you could provide your contact details for any further queries or questions that we may have.

(Source: UK SFO)

By John Lee.

Iraq’s Ministry of Oil has signed a contract with the China National Offshore Oil Corporation (CNOOC) to carry out seismic surveys of two oil exploration blocks.

One of the fields is in the territorial waters of Iraq in the Gulf, while the second in the city of Faw (Fao).

(Source: Ministry of Oil)

From Al Jazeera. Any opinions expressed are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Environmentalists say Iraq’s once fertile Faw Peninsula is facing catastrophe.

The region has seen a major collapse in its fishing and farming industries due to drought and decades of wars.

Al Jazeera‘s Imran Khan reports from Baghdad:

By John Lee.

Iraq’s National Investment Commission (NIC) has included the “Grand Port of Al Faw” in its list of major strategic projects to be presented during the Kuwait International Conference for Iraq Reconstruction, to be held in Kuwait from 12th to 14th February:

Project cost: $6 billion

Location: Basra

Design capacity:

  • Phase one 2018: containers: 24 million ton/year, unpacked materials/ 24million ton/year
  • Phase two 2028: containers: 40 million ton/year, unpacked materials/ 32 million ton/year
  • Phase three 2038: containers: 70 million ton/year, unpacked materials/ 44 million ton/year

The project includes:

  • Eastern breakwater 8km
  • Western breakwater 15km
  • Two lines for containers berth 3.5km each 12 berth to each line total 24 containers berth and area for containers storage.
  • 13 Berths for unpacked materials (grains, cement..etc.) 3.5km with conveyor belts
  • Berths for Oil products export and import (outside the port basin)
  • Roads and railways
  • Area for buildings and trucks (around 4km²)
  • Navigational channel 30km length, 17m depth.
  • Berths for various goods 4.5km (22berths)
  • industrial zone (approximately 8.5km²)
  • depth in the port basin is 15-17 m

The full 46-page document can be downloaded here.

(Source: NIC)

By John Lee.

Iraq’s Ministry of Oil has awarded the Al Faw [Al Fao] refinery and petrochemicals project to two Chinese companies.

In a statement, the ministy named the companies as Power China and “Nerco Chinese Companies“.

Mr. Assim Jihad, the spokesman of the Ministry,  said the refinery will have a capacity is 300,000 barrels/day.

He added that the project contains an integrated complex for petrochemicals, in addition to another facilities near the export port in Faw.

The ministry is planning to become self-sufficient in oil products by investing in the refining sector, and to become an exporting country.

Invitations will soon be issued to investment companies to participate in the Anbar refinery (150,000 bpd), Qayara refinery (10,000 bpd), and Thi-Qar [Dhi Qar] refinery (150,000 bpd), in addition to other projects to be announced soon.

(Source: Ministry of Oil)

Petrofac’s Engineering & Production Services (EPS) division has secured an award worth US$160 million from Basra Oil Company (BOC), previously known as South Oil Company (SOC), for its Iraq Crude Oil Export Expansion Project (ICOEEP).

The new two-year extension reflects Petrofac’s continued delivery focus and five-year track record as the incumbent operations and maintenance service provider.

The facility, which is responsible for a significant proportion of Iraq’s oil export, is located 60 kilometres (km) offshore the Al Fao Peninsula in Southern Iraq. It comprises a central metering and manifold platform and four Single Point Moorings (SPMs) which facilitate oil export onto awaiting crude carrier tankers.

In addition, Petrofac is responsible for almost 300 km of subsea pipelines,1800 metres of subsea hose infrastructure and a marine spread comprising 14 vessels.

Mani Rajapathy, Managing Director, Engineering & Production Services East, said:

“We are delighted to continue with our role in support of this key crude export facility. Since the start of our involvement in 2012, we have exported more than 2.2 billion barrels of oil while retaining an impeccable safety record. We have also remained focused on adding value for our client through the deployment of innovative and differentiated solutions.”

Ihsan Ismaael, Director General, Basra Oil Company, said:

“Petrofac is a key partner for BOC. The team has supported us over the last five years to significantly increase export from the ICOEEP facility and we look forward to continuing our relationship into 2019.”

(Source: Petrofac)

By John Lee.

The Ministry of Oil has given more information on the new investment opportunity to build a new 300,000-bpd refinery in Basra’s Faw (Fao).

The refinery is capable of being extended by adding new units for the petrochemicals industries. The execution is according to the methods of BOT or BOO according to the investment law of the refineries No.64 for 2007 and its amendments.

  • The products of the refinery must be environment friendly according to the international standards EURO-5.
  • The tax breaks must be according to the investment law No.13 for 2006.
  • According to the second amendment of the investment law No.64 for 2007. The discount on the crude oil price in the shipping port over the ship (FOB) subtract (8%) from the global price of the crude oil “the subtraction must be more than 5$ and less than 10$”.

The studies, planning and follow-up directorate in the ministry of oil will prepare the information bag of the refinery and the price of the bag will be (30) thousand dollars “nonrefundable”.

The information bag will include the following chapters:

  • The source and features of the crude oil.
  • The source and features of the water which will be supplied to the refineries.
  • The type of soil and the climate of the zone.
  • The environmental specifications.
  • The coordinates & dimensions of the refinery land … Etc.

The receipt of the bag and the presentation by the companies whom would like to invest in the mentioned refinery must be to the   studies, planning and follow-up directorate via the E-Mails (studies@oil.gov.iq) & (studies.oil@gmail.com).

(Source: Iraqi Ministry of Oil)

By Sara al-Qaher for Al Monitor. Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Controversial canal again sparks dispute in Iraq

Iraq is fighting a tide of dissent as its lawmakers accuse the government of handing over the Khor Abdullah border canal to Kuwait in an agreement concluded by the countries’ joint committees.

The Cabinet’s decision sparked outrage Jan. 26, with some parliament members and Cabinet sources claiming the move was part of a secret deal by which Iraq handed over Khor Abdullah as a gift to Kuwait, resulting in a crisis that government clarifications have failed to end.

An estuary, Khor Abdullah is at the northern end of the Persian Gulf off the shores of the Kuwaiti islands of Bubiyan and Warbah and the Iraqi Al-Faw peninsula, extending to Khor al-Zubair in Umm Qasr port.

Disagreement over the rights to Bubiyan were a major reason Iraq invaded Kuwait.

Following Iraqi President Saddam Hussein’s invasion of Kuwait in 1990, the UN Security Council in May 1993 adopted Resolution 833, demarcating the Iraq-Kuwait borders. A committee was formed of experts from 16 countries, including some former Soviet republics, the United States, the United Kingdom, Spain, Venezuela, Pakistan and Morocco. The committee was charged with technical implementation of border demarcation between Iraq and Kuwait.

According to UN documents, that committee concluded that Khor Abdullah was a vital canal for both countries. Then a joint committee was formed to draft a bilateral agreement on the organization of navigation, and in 2013 the Iraqi Cabinet ratified the agreement and delivered it to the UN.

Over the past few years, Iraqi parliamentarians have strongly contested the Baghdad government’s approval of the agreement, which officially recognizes Kuwait’s right to establish Mubarak Al Kabeer port within the area shared by both nations, thus narrowing the ports on the Iraqi side.

“There’s a secret deal between the Iraqi and Kuwaiti governments concerning Khor Abdullah. The clarifications offered by the Iraqi government in this regard are not persuasive,” parliament member Aaliyah Nasif of the State of Law Coalition told Al-Monitor. She maintains Khor Abdullah was not included in Resolution 833, in legal or geographic terms.