By Adam Lucente for Al Monitor. Any opinions expressed are those of the author(s), and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Iraqis face record-breaking heat, electricity cuts

Iraqis are contending with record-breaking temperatures and a poorly functioning electricity system as a heat wave sweeps across the country.

On Tuesday, the Iraqi capital, Baghdad, recorded an all-time high temperature of 125 degrees Fahrenheit (51.7 Celsius), according to the weather forecasting service AccuWeather.

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By Hassan Ali Ahmed for Al Monitor. Any opinions expressed here are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Mosul sowing seeds post-Islamic State

The Mosul local government in cooperation with civil society is undertaking a project to plant a million trees in Mosul.

Click here to read the full article.

By Hassan Ali Ahmed for Al Monitor. Any opinions expressed here are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Mosul sowing seeds post-Islamic State

The Mosul local government in cooperation with civil society is undertaking a project to plant a million trees in Mosul.

Click here to read the full article.

By Hassan Ali Ahmed for Al Monitor. Any opinions expressed here are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Mosul sowing seeds post-Islamic State

The Mosul local government in cooperation with civil society is undertaking a project to plant a million trees in Mosul.

Click here to read the full article.

By Mustafa Saadoun for Al Monitor. Any opinions expressed here are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Closing borders due to COVID-19 revives Iraqi agriculture

Iraq’s agriculture sector has been revived in the past few months, after the government closed its borders and banned the import of agricultural produce as a preventive measure against the coronavirus outbreak.

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New Report and Webtool Provide Insight into Iraq’s Looming Water Crisis: IOM and Deltares

Iraq faces a complex water crisis that is expected to persist and might have implications at the humanitarian, socioeconomic, security and social levels, including population movements. In July 2019, the International Organization of Migration (IOM) in Iraq identified 21,314 internally displaced persons (IDPs) from the central and southern governorates who were displaced due to the lack of water associated with high salinity content or waterborne disease outbreaks.

Intake from the Tigris and the Euphrates rivers – Iraq’s primary sources of water – is decreasing at an unprecedented rate. Concurrently, climate change is leading to increasing average temperatures and decreasing annual rainfall, causing further challenges throughout the region. The risk of water shortage-induced displacement of populations in Iraq remains high due to degradation of the quantity and quality of available water.

IOM Iraq and Deltares, an independent institute for applied research in the field of water and subsurface, have published a new report – Water Quantity and Water Quality in Central and South Iraq: A Preliminary Assessment in the Context of Displacement Risk – focused on understanding variations in water quantity and water quality in central and southern governorates over the last two decades.

“Water scarcity is one of the main threats to agricultural communities. Environmental factors are among the drivers of displacement and have witnessed this in governorates like Thi-Qar, Basra, Najaf and Kerbala,” said IOM Iraq Chief of Mission Gerard Waite. “The evidence presented in this report can inform future actions to mitigate a looming water crisis, that would leave vulnerable communities more at risk.”

The report provides insight for the coming years, and key recommendations to mitigate the water crisis, based on an exploratory model-based analysis.

“As a member of the Water, Peace and Security Partnership, Deltares aims to improve the availability of water data and information to help prevent water crises,” said Karen Meijer, Senior Researcher at Deltares. “Working with IOM has given us the opportunity to tailor our analysis to information needs for preventing and responding to water-related displacement and improve decision support in this area.”

IOM Iraq and Deltares have also launched the Iraq Water Risk Webtool, an interactive webtool that provides insight into variations in water quantity and water quality over time in the central and southern governorates in Iraq. Using data from past years, it explores the impact of different scenarios of water management, climate change, and effectiveness of measures to mitigate these changes. The tool presents Baseline, Water Management, and Climate Change scenarios, each showcasing two series of interactive maps on past and future water availability and water quality.

This study was carried out as part of IOM’s efforts to better understand forced migration as a result of environmental factors, and craft more effective responses. In Iraq, this project is a first step towards better preparedness and response measures – designed by and for vulnerable populations that may be faced with the difficult prospect of climate migration.

The study was funded by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration. Deltares’ work under the Water, Peace and Security partnership was funded by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Kingdom of the Netherlands.

For more information please contact IOM Iraq’s Public Information Unit, Tel: +964 751 402 2811, Email: iraqpublicinfo@iom.int

(Source: UN)

(Picture credit: Aziz1005)

From Al Jazeera. Any opinions expressed are those of the author(s), and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

With a fall in oil prices, countries like Iraq are looking to diversify their economy.

But corruption is making that difficult.

Al Jazeera‘s Simona Foltyn has this exclusive report on the challenges facing Iraq’s agriculture sector:

By Al-Monitor staff. Any opinions expressed are those of the author(s), and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Islamic State believed behind crop fires in Iraq’s disputed territories

Crops are burning in northern Iraq’s disputed territories again and locals are mobilizing to fight the suspected culprit, the Islamic State.

Click here to read the full story.

Iraq has experienced a massive wave of displacement over the last four years that has caused an intricate housing, land and property situation.

During the recent conflict, many Iraqi citizens have had their property rights violated, such as having lost possession of their property or have had their property damaged or destroyed by different actors.

Approximately 5.8 million Iraqis were forced to abandon their homes and leave their areas of origin as a consequence of fear of violence, lack of freedom of movement, lack of access to basic services. In conflict affected areas, unlawful seizure, sale, systematic looting, and destruction of properties were highly common, and are consequently unable to return to their area of origin, are not able to re-establish their lives, or do not have the financial resources to rebuild their homes.

Enjoying tenure security and access to housing is a human right and humanitarian and governmental actors have a responsibility in ensuring that the rights of people are restored and respected.

PURPOSE OF THE COMPENSATION GUIDELINES

These guidelines have been drafted by HLP Sub-cluster Iraq to advise humanitarian actors who are working on compensation and HLP related issues.

The guidelines set out the scheme as set out in Iraq’s Law 20 of 2009,3 Law 574 of 2015 and Law 2 of 20205 which govern the compensation of all Iraqi citizens affected by damage or destruction of their properties caused by war operations, military errors and terrorist actions in Iraq.

It should be noted that the below guidelines will focus on compensation for housing, land and property only and not any of the other categories eligible for compensation foreseen by above mentioned laws.

Click here to download the full report.

(Source: OCHA)

By Dr Renad Mansour and Glada Lahn, for the Royal Institute for International Affairs (Chatham House). Any opinions expressed are those of the author(s), and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Same Old Politics Will Not Solve Iraq Water Crisis

Addressing Iraq’s water crisis should be a priority for any incoming prime minister as it is damaging the country’s attempts to rebuild.

But successive governments have allowed the problem to fester.

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