By Adnan Abu Zeed for Al Monitor. Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Iraqi Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi announced Nov. 29 that he would officially submit his resignation to parliament, in the first government response to the wide public protests that have been sweeping through Iraq for two months.

Former judge and legal expert Ali al-Tamimi explained to Al-Monitor the legal and constitutional steps that will follow Abdul Mahdi’s resignation announcement.

“The president accepts the resignation under Article 18 of the Cabinet system, which considers the whole government resigned with all its ministers,” he said.

Click here to read the full article.

By Adnan Abu Zeed for Al Monitor. Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Iraqi Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi announced Nov. 29 that he would officially submit his resignation to parliament, in the first government response to the wide public protests that have been sweeping through Iraq for two months.

Former judge and legal expert Ali al-Tamimi explained to Al-Monitor the legal and constitutional steps that will follow Abdul Mahdi’s resignation announcement.

“The president accepts the resignation under Article 18 of the Cabinet system, which considers the whole government resigned with all its ministers,” he said.

Click here to read the full article.

From Al Jazeera. Any opinions expressed are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Adel Abdul Mahdi became prime minister in October 2018, at a time of unrest in the country.

His government promised to make things better, but said it needed more time but was unsuccessful.

Now, Iraqi politics moves into uncharted territory.

Al Jazeera‘s Katia Lopez-Hodoyan reports:

dBy John Lee.

Iraq’s parliament has reportedly approved the resignation of Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi.

According to BBC News, it is unclear who will take over from Mr Abdul Mahdi, as existing laws do not specify how parliament should deal with a prime minister’s resignation.

On Sunday clashes continued in cities including Baghdad and Najaf.

(Source: BBC News)

By Abbas Kadhim, for the Atlantic Council.

The challenges Iraq faces after prime minister’s resignation

The news on November 29 that Iraqi Prime Minister Adil Abdul-Mahdi will resign is unprecedented in post-2003 Iraq.

Many questions must be answered before his successor is appointed, and in the meantime, we can expect unrest to continue.

The immediate concern will be constitutional.

The Iraqi constitution addresses the replacement of a prime minister following his removal from office by a parliamentary vote of no-confidence and in the case of vacancy for any reason, but it is silent on resignation, other than a scenario related to the dissolution of parliament and the calling of a new election.

The full article can be viewed here.

(Source: Atlantic Council)

By Abbas Kadhim, for the Atlantic Council.

The challenges Iraq faces after prime minister’s resignation

The news on November 29 that Iraqi Prime Minister Adil Abdul-Mahdi will resign is unprecedented in post-2003 Iraq.

Many questions must be answered before his successor is appointed, and in the meantime, we can expect unrest to continue.

The immediate concern will be constitutional.

The Iraqi constitution addresses the replacement of a prime minister following his removal from office by a parliamentary vote of no-confidence and in the case of vacancy for any reason, but it is silent on resignation, other than a scenario related to the dissolution of parliament and the calling of a new election.

The full article can be viewed here.

(Source: Atlantic Council)

The Iraqi Prime Minister, Adel Abdul Mahdi, announced on November 29 that he is to submit his resignation to Parliament in the wake of increasing violence across the country.

The announcement was shown on state television and came one day after at least 35 protestors were killed by the security forces. Grand Ayatollah al-Sistani’s latest sermon, in which he calls on the Iraqi Parliament to remove their support for the Cabinet, will have added untold pressure on the PM.

In his statement, Abdul Mahdi states “In response to this call, and in order to facilitate it as quickly as possible, I will present to parliament a demand (to accept) my resignation from the leadership of the current government.”

It is also reported that the PM’s Chief of Staff, Abu Jihad, has also announced his decision to stand down. Whilst there was no mention of when thePM will stand down, it is likely to be in conjunction with the sitting of Parliament on Sunday, December 01, although some people –such as several MPs aligned with the Sairoun Alliance –are calling for an emergency session to be held on November 30.

(Source: GardaWorld)

The Iraqi Prime Minister, Adel Abdul Mahdi, announced on November 29 that he is to submit his resignation to Parliament in the wake of increasing violence across the country.

The announcement was shown on state television and came one day after at least 35 protestors were killed by the security forces. Grand Ayatollah al-Sistani’s latest sermon, in which he calls on the Iraqi Parliament to remove their support for the Cabinet, will have added untold pressure on the PM.

In his statement, Abdul Mahdi states “In response to this call, and in order to facilitate it as quickly as possible, I will present to parliament a demand (to accept) my resignation from the leadership of the current government.”

It is also reported that the PM’s Chief of Staff, Abu Jihad, has also announced his decision to stand down. Whilst there was no mention of when thePM will stand down, it is likely to be in conjunction with the sitting of Parliament on Sunday, December 01, although some people –such as several MPs aligned with the Sairoun Alliance –are calling for an emergency session to be held on November 30.

(Source: GardaWorld)

The following is attributable to US State Department Spokesperson Morgan Ortagus:

Secretary of State Michael R. Pompeo spoke [on Tuesday] with Iraqi Prime Minister Adil Abd al-Mahdi.

Secretary Pompeo emphasized that peaceful public demonstrations are a fundamental element of all democracies. The Secretary deplored the death toll among the protesters as a result of the Government of Iraq’s crackdown and use of lethal force, as well as the reports of kidnapped protesters.

Secretary Pompeo urged Prime Minister Abd al-Mahdi to take immediate steps to address the protesters’ legitimate grievances by enacting reforms and tackling corruption. He reaffirmed the United States’ enduring commitment to a strong, sovereign, and prosperous Iraq, as outlined in our bilateral Strategic Framework Agreement.

Secretary Pompeo pledged to continue to support the Iraqi Security Forces in fighting ISIS.

(Source: US State Department)

By Ali Mamouri for Al-Monitor. Any opinions expressed are those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Despite several proposals to solve the crises in Iraq and in spite of using different tactics such as promises and threats, the Iraqi government is unable to stop the protests and is unable to convince protesters to go home.

Special Representative for Iraq and head of the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq Jeanine Hennis-Plasschaert met with Iraq’s top Shiite authority, Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, in Najaf on Nov. 11 to discuss political solutions to the ongoing protests.

Following the meeting, Hennis-Plasschaert noted that “the religious authority is concerned about the lack of seriousness among the political forces to undertake reforms.”

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