Saleh assures the King of Jordan the need to provide Iraq with information on money smugglers and those wanted for the judiciary

11/15/2018

The President of the Republic Barham Salih of Jordan’s King Abdullah II, on Thursday, the need to provide Iraq with information on money smugglers and wanted to the judiciary, while calling for Jordanian companies to invest in Iraq, he pointed to the importance of facilitating the procedures for granting visas to Iraqis.

The Presidency of the Republic said in a statement received by Alsumaria News a copy of that, "President Barham Salih met, on Thursday, in Amman with Jordan’s King Abdullah II."

The two sides discussed the developments in the Arab region and the necessity of working to support the unity of the Arab ranks and the convergence of views on the issues related to the security and stability of the region.

They pointed out the importance of cooperation in activating the tripartite strategic partnership (Iraq / Jordan / Egypt ) "He said.

He pointed out that "the President of the Republic discussed with the King of Jordan the return of Iraqi frozen and smuggled funds, where he stressed the need to provide Iraq with information on smugglers and wanted to justice, as well as discuss coordination and military cooperation and exchange of information between the security services in both countries."

The statement added that "On the economic side, the two sides discussed the establishment of a free industrial city at the border port in Trebil, and the project of electricity connection between Iraq and Jordan through Anbar province ."

Saleh stressed, "according to the statement," the need to strengthen relations between the two countries by opening greater horizons for cooperation in the fields of trade and economic and security coordination common, "praising" Jordan’s position on Iraq in its war against terrorism. "

"The victory of Iraq and the defeat of the terrorist organization is a victory for the region and the world. It is necessary to preserve this victory by standing up against everything that destabilizes peace and stability," he said. "He said.

He urged the President of the Republic "Jordanian companies to invest in Iraq," pointing at the same time to "the importance of facilitating the procedures for granting visas to Iraqis."

For his part, the Jordanian King "congratulations on the assumption of the President of the Republic Barham Saleh functions," stressing his country’s keenness on "security and stability of Iraq."

It is noteworthy that President Barham Salih arrived earlier in the day, Thursday, to Jordan on an official visit.

https://www.alsumaria.tv/news/252741…D8%A7%D8%AA/ar


Central Bank confirms that the process of replacing damaged funds "legal and according to the controls"
11/15/2018


revealed the Iraqi Central Bank, on Thursday, for the reasons that prompted him to replace banknotes damaged in 2013, confirming that all procedures relating to the replacement of those securities "took place in accordance with the instructions and rules of law."

"The cash exchange process is a daily function, and if we assume that the central bank did not receive the banknotes (the damaged banknotes in 2013) or the last receipt, the banknotes will cause more problems of rot," said Ihsan al-Yasiri, director general of the central bank,

And will constitute damage to the treasury of Rafidain Bank, and will pass the loss to the owner of the bank, which is the Ministry of Finance so the central bank received and conducted the process of replacement.




For his part, the Director General of the Legal Department in the bank that "Article 33 and Article 34 of the Iraqi Central Bank No. 56 of 2004 was clear on the replacement of currency and cash damaged, which is considered the core duties and functions of the Central Bank of Iraq based on the law.

He added that "this process is carried out by the mechanism and controls and instructions issued by the issuance department and the treasury in the bank, which has implemented instructions on the subject in question," noting that "all procedures related to the replacement of currency in a timely manner in 2013 took place in accordance with the law and instructions and controls."

https://www.alsumaria.tv/news/252744…D9%84%D9%81/ar

Central: Some financial and banking services companies do not have a certificate
11/15/2018

said the Iraqi Central Bank on Thursday that some companies offering financial and banking services do not enjoy Palmsadeghih.


The bank said in a statement received by Alsumaria News, a copy of it that "the banks authorized all, the scrutiny of some companies, offices and entities and offers such as financial services, banking, finance and training and other areas," noting that "some of them are not credible and may cause risks.


The bank welcomed "cooperation and advice in the investigation of those entities before entering into with them in transactions, contracts or agreements in order to protect the banking sector from fraud and fraud or waste of money and time with non-qualified."


The Central Bank of Iraq was established as an independent bank under its law of 6 March 2004 as an independent body responsible for maintaining price stability and implementing monetary policy.

It supervises 10 commercial banks, 26 private banks and 16 Islamic banks, as well as 19 foreign banks. 6 financial institutions and 31 financial transfer companies.

https://www.alsumaria.tv/news/252699…D8%AA%D9%85/ar

Aiming for more sustainable options for dealing with the huge amounts of rubble borne out of the ISIL conflict, municipalities of around half a dozen devastated cities in western Iraq explored opportunities to establish debris recycling centres to help advance recovery efforts at a two-day workshop held in Ramadi’s Anbar University on 7-8 November 2018.

Hosted by Anbar Governorate and organized in collaboration with the Iraq Ministry of Health and Environment with technical advisory support from UN Environment, the gathering brought together – for the first time – key stakeholders from local authorities, technical government departments, university academics, demining experts, as well as UN agencies to discuss more sustainable options for dealing with the huge amounts of rubble created by the ISIL conflict.

“Over two years since retaking most of Anbar’s shattered cities from the grips of ISIL terrorists in 2016, rubble continues to be a major obstacle for tens of thousands of displaced persons to regain their homes, and restart their lives and businesses,” said Mr. Mustapha Arsan, deputy governor of Anbar Governorate.

Municipal representatives from the most damaged cities of Ramadi, Haditha, Hit, Qaim and Kubaisa, in Iraq’s upper Euphrates region, underscored the major problems they continue to face in removing colossal volumes of rubble. Lack of debris removal equipment and inadequate operational budgets were highlighted as major constraints. While most of the rubble in the streets has been removed, much of the remaining debris will be generated from building demolition.

The Qaim Maqam (head of district) of Ramadi, Mr. Ibrahim Al-Awsaj, stated that around 80 percent of Ramadi – capital of Anbar governorate with a population of over 570,000 people before the conflict – lay in ruins. Preliminary estimates by Ramadi municipality indicate that around three of the seven million tonnes of debris have so far been removed with extensive support from the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)’s Funding Facility for Immediate Stabilization.

Furthermore, debris removal is significantly complicated by exceptionally high levels of contamination with unexploded ordnance and booby traps. “Over 20,000 explosive devices have so far been from Ramadi city alone,” said Mr. Al-Awsaj. Training and establishing clear procedures for dealing with explosives in the debris is a critical prerequisite for clearing-up the rubble.

“Debris continues to be scooped and dumped in an uncontrolled manner creating serious health and environmental risks and burdensome economic liabilities for the future,” decried Mr. Qais Abd, head of the Anbar Environment Directorate. Mr. Abd added that “future campaigns to remove debris haphazardly dumped all over the place may be needed,” engendering additional costs for the financially strapped local authorities.

Emphasizing that many other post-conflict cities faced similar challenges, UN Environment expert Martin Bjerregaard affirmed that considerable experience exists from elsewhere that can help inform Anbar’s debris management efforts. “We are not starting from scratch here,” said Mr. Bjerregaard, who went on to share lessons from neighbouring Mosul as well as Syria, Lebanon, Philippines, and going to back the Balkans conflict in the late 1990s.

The workshop also highlighted ongoing work by UNDP’s Funding Facility for Immediate Stabilization and the International Organization Migration to establish debris recycling centres in Mosul with technical advice from UN Environment. This initiative will help create much needed jobs through cash-for-work programmes.

Original research by Anbar University engineer Mr. Salah Thameel found that crushed debris from Ramadi were of high quality and complied with Iraqi engineering standards for use in civil works, including as underlying subbase for roads.

“The cost of crushing the debris is about one third of buying fresh quarry materials and, if transportation costs are added, it would account for only 10 percent,” explained Mr. Thameel. Furthermore, “by reusing the crushed debris, we would significantly reduce negative environmental impacts of quarrying and polluting emissions from trucking gravel from quarry sites,” he asserted.

Crushing debris would not only significantly facilitate rubble removal operations by reducing the volumes handled, but would also result in important cost savings. “We are eager to start with recycling and welcome support from the friends of Iraq to help us in rebuilding our damaged cities,” stated Ms. Asmaa Osama, President of the Committee of Health and Environment and member of Anbar Provincial Council.

Workshop participants further recommended that an Anbar-wide debris management action plan led by the Governorate is developed to help coordinate debris recycling efforts across its damaged cities. Key actions including identification of potential sites for setting-up debris recycling centres were also discussed with a specific focus on Ramadi city as a demonstration pilot.

(Source: UN)

By Omar al-Jaffal for Al Monitor. Any views expressed here are those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News. 

Iraq’s Governorates Reject 2019 Draft Budget

Anger is escalating in Basra over the new government’s stance toward this strategic city and the demands of its people. The continued marginalization of this oil-rich city could spell a new round of unrest.

Voices have been calling for new protests and sit-ins in Basra in light of what activists describe as neglect of the province by the Iraqi central and local governments.

As part of their efforts to organize protests, Basra activists launched the Arabic hashtag that translates into “We are coming back for you.”

They called on Basra’s residents to stage mass protests in front of the South Oil Company (SOC) on Nov. 4 and to prevent its employees from entering its premises.

Click here to read the full story.

By Ahmed Twaij, for Foreign Policy.

Recent violent protests in the southern Iraqi city of Basra have brought to light years of suffering by Iraqis in what is known as the economic capital of Iraq due to its vast oil reserves and deep-sea port access connecting the country to the international market.

Basra, a predominantly Shiite city, also has a significant minority population, including black Iraqis and Christians. It is Iraq’s second-largest city and has developed a reputation for fostering some of Iraq’s greatest artists.

During the first Gulf War, the Iraqi military used Basra as a route for the Kuwait invasion; ironically, a decade later, U.S.-led forces used it as a path toward Baghdad during the 2003 invasion.

Click here to read the full story.

By Hamdi Malik for Al Monitor. Any views expressed here are those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News. 

As protests continue, residents of Iraq’s Basra call for autonomy

Anger is escalating in Basra over the new government’s stance toward this strategic city and the demands of its people. The continued marginalization of this oil-rich city could spell a new round of unrest.

Voices have been calling for new protests and sit-ins in Basra in light of what activists describe as neglect of the province by the Iraqi central and local governments.

As part of their efforts to organize protests, Basra activists launched the Arabic hashtag that translates into “We are coming back for you.”

They called on Basra’s residents to stage mass protests in front of the South Oil Company (SOC) on Nov. 4 and to prevent its employees from entering its premises.

Click here to read the full story.

(Picture credit: Ahmed Mahmoud)